PDA

View Full Version : What does it mean to share in the sufferings of Christ?



bagofseed
Apr 7th 2009, 07:00 AM
What does it mean to share in the sufferings of Christ?

Teke
Apr 7th 2009, 12:34 PM
It means to hold fast to God while suffering in this world.

Mat 10:38 And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me.

There are many symbols of crosses which hold meaning. One of which is that the cross is a key to forgiveness.

Rom 8:18 For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time [are] not worthy [to be compared] with the glory which shall be revealed in us.

In Romans 8 we read of a contrast between suffering and glory. As Christians, we have God's glory in us and we experience "the firstfruits" (8:23) though His glory is not yet fully revealed (see Col. 3:3,4).
In my church we depict this in the placement of icons. On one side of the altar is a icon of the Incarnation of the Son (left side), on the other side (right side) is an icon of Christ as Ruler on the throne in glory. This reminds us that we are in a tension between our present and future experience of the Kingdom, as we live between Christ's first and second coming.

billy-brown 2
Apr 7th 2009, 06:09 PM
It means to hold fast to God while suffering in this world.

Mat 10:38 And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me.

There are many symbols of crosses which hold meaning. One of which is that the cross is a key to forgiveness.

Rom 8:18 For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time [are] not worthy [to be compared] with the glory which shall be revealed in us.

In Romans 8 we read of a contrast between suffering and glory. As Christians, we have God's glory in us and we experience "the firstfruits" (8:23) though His glory is not yet fully revealed (see Col. 3:3,4).
In my church we depict this in the placement of icons. On one side of the altar is a icon of the Incarnation of the Son (left side), on the other side (right side) is an icon of Christ as Ruler on the throne in glory. This reminds us that we are in a tension between our present and future experience of the Kingdom, as we live between Christ's first and second coming.

Yep . . . ^^^^

Apparently, His suffering was not complete after his death:

Col. 1:24
24 (http://bible.cc/colossians/1-24.htm) Now I (the Apostle Paul) rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I do my share on behalf of His body, which is the church, in filling up what is lacking in Christís afflictions.

And, of course, John the Revelator had his activities in tribulation also:

Rev. 1:9
9 (http://bible.cc/revelation/1-9.htm) I, John, your brother and fellow partaker in the tribulation and kingdom and perseverance which are in Jesus, was on the island called Patmos because of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus.

tt1106
Apr 7th 2009, 06:16 PM
The Disciples modeled this for us. We share in the sufferings of Christ,
We are Life to the Living and Death to the Dead. Who among us is sufficient for this. None. But with Christ all things are possible.

Christ not only suffered physically, he had the weight of those who would not accept him on him too. I sometimes think of how God feels knowing he has the cure for our illness, yet so many people choose to die.

Lars777
Apr 7th 2009, 06:32 PM
"This is the gospel that you heard and that has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven, and of which I, Paul, have become a servant. Now I rejoice in what was suffered for you, and I fill up in my flesh what is still lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church. I have become its servant by the commission God gave me to present to you the word of God in its fullness..." (Colossians 1:23-25)




One of the remarkable things that Christians learn is that others have had a part in bringing the gospel to them.

Oftentimes that part was played long before we ever came to Christ, but when we learn of it we are greatly moved.

I will never forget the Methodist evangelist who preached to me when I was a boy. I remember to this day the text he preached from because when I heard the gospel from him I came to Christ.

I do not know where that man is or what has happened to him, but his name and the memory of that occasion are still fresh in my mind.


Paul says such service involves much pain and sacrifice: "I fill up in my flesh what is still lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church."

What does he mean, that something is lacking in the afflictions of Christ? Clearly, he does not mean that something was lacking in the atoning work of Jesus; that the suffering of the cross was not sufficient to settle the question of sin.

The fact is, the word "afflictions" is never used in the scriptures to describe the death of Jesus. Afflictions are what Jesus went through before the cross from the opposition of the enemy, the devil, and from our Lord's willingness to make himself a servant to others and to minister to human needs.

That was when he endured "afflictions."

But there is nothing lacking in what he did on the cross. Scripture says, "He is able to save to the uttermost all those who come unto God through him." John adds, "He is the propitiation for our sin, and not for ours only but for the sins of the whole world."

There is nothing lacking there! But when we are engaged in fighting against the opposition of the devil and his angels, when we are opposed by the lusts of the flesh and face the subtle lies and deceptions of the world around us, then we find we are engaged in a combat, and combat is always costly!

Someone must pay a price in order that others might come to Christ.

Have you ever asked yourself, how many prayers and tears, how much heartache and disappointment has someone gone through for you in order that you might come to Christ?

I never read the Scriptures without a momentary thought, at least, of what it cost others for me to have this Bible in my hand: the blood of martyrs, the fears and tears of persecuted people throughout centuries, the sweat and labor of translators, and the effort of teachers to make it plain and clear.

We should never read the Scriptures without remembering that someone has died to make it possible.

When we come to Christ we are to take up this battle and suffer on behalf of others. It not only benefits others but it benefits us as well. That is why Paul says, "I rejoice in my sufferings on your behalf."

"It does something for me," he says. "It keeps me usable. I am reminded constantly that it is out of weakness that I am made strong." That is what suffering for others will do for us: it will keep us humble and useful.

But it also has great effect upon others: it shows them that we are deeply concerned. We pray for them, we long for them, we grieve over them, we hurt when they hurt.

That is the process by which others come to Christ.

billy-brown 2
Apr 7th 2009, 10:47 PM
"This is the gospel that you heard and that has been proclaimed to every creature under heaven, and of which I, Paul, have become a servant. Now I rejoice in what was suffered for you, and I fill up in my flesh what is still lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church. I have become its servant by the commission God gave me to present to you the word of God in its fullness..." (Colossians 1:23-25)




One of the remarkable things that Christians learn is that others have had a part in bringing the gospel to them.

Oftentimes that part was played long before we ever came to Christ, but when we learn of it we are greatly moved.

I will never forget the Methodist evangelist who preached to me when I was a boy. I remember to this day the text he preached from because when I heard the gospel from him I came to Christ.

I do not know where that man is or what has happened to him, but his name and the memory of that occasion are still fresh in my mind.


Paul says such service involves much pain and sacrifice: "I fill up in my flesh what is still lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church."

What does he mean, that something is lacking in the afflictions of Christ? Clearly, he does not mean that something was lacking in the atoning work of Jesus; that the suffering of the cross was not sufficient to settle the question of sin.

The fact is, the word "afflictions" is never used in the scriptures to describe the death of Jesus. Afflictions are what Jesus went through before the cross from the opposition of the enemy, the devil, and from our Lord's willingness to make himself a servant to others and to minister to human needs.

That was when he endured "afflictions."

But there is nothing lacking in what he did on the cross. Scripture says, "He is able to save to the uttermost all those who come unto God through him." John adds, "He is the propitiation for our sin, and not for ours only but for the sins of the whole world."

There is nothing lacking there! But when we are engaged in fighting against the opposition of the devil and his angels, when we are opposed by the lusts of the flesh and face the subtle lies and deceptions of the world around us, then we find we are engaged in a combat, and combat is always costly!

Someone must pay a price in order that others might come to Christ.

Have you ever asked yourself, how many prayers and tears, how much heartache and disappointment has someone gone through for you in order that you might come to Christ?

I never read the Scriptures without a momentary thought, at least, of what it cost others for me to have this Bible in my hand: the blood of martyrs, the fears and tears of persecuted people throughout centuries, the sweat and labor of translators, and the effort of teachers to make it plain and clear.

We should never read the Scriptures without remembering that someone has died to make it possible.

When we come to Christ we are to take up this battle and suffer on behalf of others. It not only benefits others but it benefits us as well. That is why Paul says, "I rejoice in my sufferings on your behalf."

"It does something for me," he says. "It keeps me usable. I am reminded constantly that it is out of weakness that I am made strong." That is what suffering for others will do for us: it will keep us humble and useful.

But it also has great effect upon others: it shows them that we are deeply concerned. We pray for them, we long for them, we grieve over them, we hurt when they hurt.

That is the process by which others come to Christ.


Yep . . .that . . .^^^^^^^^^^^

We all experience suffering, indeed--it's part of the package as we give to others the life of the Gospel:

2 Cor. 4-7-12:
7 (http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-7.htm) But we (Paul and his team) have this treasure (of the glorious Gospel) in earthen vessels, so that the surpassing greatness of the power will be of God and not from ourselves; 8 (http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-8.htm) we are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not despairing; 9 (http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-9.htm) persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; 10 (http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-10.htm) always carrying about in the body the dying of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body. 11 (http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-11.htm) For we who live are constantly being delivered over to death for Jesusí sake, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh. 12 (http://bible.cc/2_corinthians/4-12.htm) So death works in us, but life in you.

bagofseed
Apr 8th 2009, 03:11 AM
"

That is the process by which others come to Christ.
Sounds to me like you just described love.

The more we love as we should, the more we will suffer, because in a sinful and broken world that is what love does, it suffers for doing what is love, what is right.

crossnote
Apr 8th 2009, 06:04 AM
But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us. We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair; Persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed; Always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body. For we which live are alway delivered unto death for Jesus' sake, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our mortal flesh.
(2Co 4:7-11)

But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth the dead:
(2Co 1:9)

Tomlane
Apr 8th 2009, 10:42 PM
Suffering for Christ today is walking outside of man's religion and that means living our life outside the box and living by God's word and not putting our faith in man's institutions but in God's word only then walking in that only.

Tomlane

Your Advert here


Hosted by Webnet77