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NOVA2
Apr 17th 2009, 02:27 AM
I've read about people who get angry at God when they deal with rough times and trials, especially on such things as long illnesses and deaths. I wonder if this is just a symptom of grief or a sign of spiritual rebellion. True character is never revealed until it's tested, so how does a person know if their anger or questions in hard times is just a normal process or a spiritual problem? Could it be a combination of both?

NotMyOwn
Apr 17th 2009, 02:31 AM
I think it could be a little of both. But I think even the best Christian people can get angry under certain circumstances. The question is, what do they do afterwards, do they either repent of their anger or do they continue in rebellion.

bagofseed
Apr 17th 2009, 03:18 AM
I've read about people who get angry at God when they deal with rough times and trials, especially on such things as long illnesses and deaths. I wonder if this is just a symptom of grief or a sign of spiritual rebellion. True character is never revealed until it's tested, so how does a person know if their anger or questions in hard times is just a normal process or a spiritual problem? Could it be a combination of both?
Trails expose us, that's the benefit.
Mostly we are blind naked and poor and don't know it.
God show us who we are and who He is, again and again.
God can handle our frustration, disappointment and anger.
How can we confess our sin if we are blind to it?

Pray, God expose who I really am, let me see myself as you do.
Amen.

cajunman4life
Apr 17th 2009, 04:31 AM
I'm reminded of the story of Lazarus in the gospel of St. John.

Martha, a sister of Lazarus, met Jesus on the road when she heard he was coming. Now the Bible doesn't say this, but I believe it was in a form of "grieving anger" that she confronted Jesus and said "Lord, if thou hadst been here, my brother had not died." Her sister Mary has a similar confrontation. And then we get to what is the shortest verse in the Bible (or one of the shortest if not the shortest)... John 11:35 "Jesus wept."

The sisters were angry, but in grief, not in rebellion. They weren't really blaming Jesus. It's similar to how a grieving family member might say "If only I had done something different" about their departed.

But Jesus shows compassion, and in a big way. Jesus wept. This, to me, indicates that God understands our anger is in grief, and we are not really angry with Him. And yet, while we believe we are angry, God shows compassion to us.

I think that if the person in question is a true believer, then they may be angry with God due to grief rather than rebellion, much the same way that Martha and Mary were (Martha affirmed her belief in Jesus after their exchange - John 11:27).

Conversely, I believe that if a non-believer is angry at God, it can't be in rebellion (after all, they were a non-believer... what were they rebelling against?).

Just my take on this.

crossnote
Apr 17th 2009, 06:32 AM
I've read about people who get angry at God when they deal with rough times and trials, especially on such things as long illnesses and deaths. I wonder if this is just a symptom of grief or a sign of spiritual rebellion. True character is never revealed until it's tested, so how does a person know if their anger or questions in hard times is just a normal process or a spiritual problem? Could it be a combination of both?

Our hearts easily deceive us into thinking we are something we aren't. But God who is greater than our hearts has His ways and means to show us what we are really made of...hence we repent truly. This is beautifully illustrated in Peter's denial of Christ and his restoration.

Chaplain
Apr 17th 2009, 07:11 AM
Hi--- It is a spiritual problem. Nothing happens unless God allows it. God never allows anything to happen that is not for our own good. Death, for instance. We have no idea what might have happened in the persons life if they had lived. There are many things worse than death. That is if the person is saved. The bible teaches that we are to never question God. Isa 64:8, But now, O LORD, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand.

In Christ,
Chaplain

SweetSomber
Apr 17th 2009, 07:31 AM
People who get angry at God should go and talk to Him, and become reconciled. We all feel angry at some point, but we are to resolve that anger. David asked God "why have you forsaken me?" when we know, of course, that God did not truly forsake him - David was hurting, and wanted answers from God, but in his psalms comes around at the end to praising God.

David was a man after God's own heart. But if we prayed stuff like the psalms in church, many would complain that we are not being reverent enough. Maybe the christian church doesn't understand that God's fine with us being upset and coming to him for answers - cus He always has the answers, and the comfort that we are deep down looking for!

But if we continue in anger, judging God for his allowing stuff, then we are in rebellion.

The Bible DOES NOT teach that we should never question God, but teaches that we should trust Him - for we know that He is all loving, and all wise. There is no problem with us questioning what He does, and grow to understand more and more about Him and who He is and what He likes and how He thinks. God even says in Isaiah, "Come, let us reason together." Abraham even bartered with God! Jacob wrestled with God. God didn't mind. :)

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