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Fsbirdhouse
Apr 24th 2009, 04:04 AM
Perhaps one of the most bizzare stories in the bible is that of the Tower of Babel.
Always wondered why God bothered to mix the languages of the human race. The fracturing of humanity certainly let to a great deal more violence on the earth and I would think history bears this out.
Now Genesis 11: 9 leaves us with the thought that the Lord WANTED us to scatter over the face of the earth, and this event was acted out for THAT pupose. That was indeed the end result. But was it His purpose?
Rather than mix the languages of humanity, why didn't He just wait?
God knows the end from begining and always has.
History has shown us that men are eventually forced to migrate away from overcrowding and tyranny, and both would have taken place in short order, and God knew it.
Read the story in genesis 11:1-9
Being scattered is a concern of the men at Babel, and they say so.
Scattering the men at Babel is nowhere mentioned as God declares His concern, and HIS intention.
6And the Lord said, ‘Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
Come, let us go down, and confuse their language there, so that they will not understand one another’s speech.’
It was the ability they had to communicate with one another that He is addressing.
What threat did this pose?
"nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
That was a VERY REAL THREAT, one that the Lord posponed for nearly 5,000 years.
Two hundred years ago the British empire began to colonize nearly every continent on earth, and to that purpose she naturally spread the English language as she did so. That language has, as a result, undone the work that was done by the Lord at Babel. It has now become the language of the human race for all practical purposes.
The very real 'threat' that it would have posed at Babel is now realised in our modern world.
Two hundred years ago the human race possessed only 5 major technologies that were used by all as a general rule.
1) Fire
2) The Wheel
3) The Sail
4) Guns
5) Gunpowder
We did not yet know how to harness steam to do work.
Steam was the foundation of heavy industry and the first step to all that has come since.
Where have we come since communications have been restored to humanity?
The airplane. Nuclear power and weapons, Computors, etc. and by far the gravest threat we have ever faced, Genetic engineering.
I classify genetic engineering as our most lethal threat because it is one humanity seems willing to embrace with open arms.
All other threats are recognized as danger. Genetic engineering is desired as a supposed benefit.
The next time you consider the Tower of Babel, count the 5,000 years from then until now now as a blessing.
If not for that act, you would never have been born.
Praise God!

BroRog
Apr 24th 2009, 04:51 AM
Perhaps one of the most bizzare stories in the bible is that of the Tower of Babel.
Always wondered why God bothered to mix the languages of the human race. The fracturing of humanity certainly let to a great deal more violence on the earth and I would think history bears this out.
Now Genesis 11: 9 leaves us with the thought that the Lord WANTED us to scatter over the face of the earth, and this event was acted out for THAT pupose. That was indeed the end result. But was it His purpose?
Rather than mix the languages of humanity, why didn't He just wait?
God knows the end from begining and always has.
History has shown us that men are eventually forced to migrate away from overcrowding and tyranny, and both would have taken place in short order, and God knew it.
Read the story in genesis 11:1-9
Being scattered is a concern of the men at Babel, and they say so.
Scattering the men at Babel is nowhere mentioned as God declares His concern, and HIS intention.
6And the Lord said, ‘Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
Come, let us go down, and confuse their language there, so that they will not understand one another’s speech.’
It was the ability they had to communicate with one another that He is addressing.
What threat did this pose?
"nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
That was a VERY REAL THREAT, one that the Lord posponed for nearly 5,000 years.
Two hundred years ago the British empire began to colonize nearly every continent on earth, and to that purpose she naturally spread the English language as she did so. That language has, as a result, undone the work that was done by the Lord at Babel. It has now become the language of the human race for all practical purposes.
The very real 'threat' that it would have posed at Babel is now realised in our modern world.
Two hundred years ago the human race possessed only 5 major technologies that were used by all as a general rule.
1) Fire
2) The Wheel
3) The Sail
4) Guns
5) Gunpowder
We did not yet know how to harness steam to do work.
Steam was the foundation of heavy industry and the first step to all that has come since.
Where have we come since communications have been restored to humanity?
The airplane. Nuclear power and weapons, Computors, etc. and by far the gravest threat we have ever faced, Genetic engineering.
I classify genetic engineering as our most lethal threat because it is one humanity seems willing to embrace with open arms.
All other threats are recognized as danger. Genetic engineering is desired as a supposed benefit.
The next time you consider the Tower of Babel, count the 5,000 years from then until now now as a blessing.
If not for that act, you would never have been born.
Praise God!

Why the tower? What did they hope to accomplish?

Sojourner
Apr 24th 2009, 08:51 AM
Perhaps one of the most bizzare stories in the bible is that of the Tower of Babel.
Always wondered why God bothered to mix the languages of the human race. The fracturing of humanity certainly let to a great deal more violence on the earth and I would think history bears this out.
Now Genesis 11: 9 leaves us with the thought that the Lord WANTED us to scatter over the face of the earth, and this event was acted out for THAT pupose. That was indeed the end result. But was it His purpose?
Rather than mix the languages of humanity, why didn't He just wait?
God knows the end from begining and always has.
History has shown us that men are eventually forced to migrate away from overcrowding and tyranny, and both would have taken place in short order, and God knew it.
Read the story in genesis 11:1-9
Being scattered is a concern of the men at Babel, and they say so.
Scattering the men at Babel is nowhere mentioned as God declares His concern, and HIS intention.
6And the Lord said, ‘Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
Come, let us go down, and confuse their language there, so that they will not understand one another’s speech.’
It was the ability they had to communicate with one another that He is addressing.
What threat did this pose?
"nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
That was a VERY REAL THREAT, one that the Lord posponed for nearly 5,000 years.
Two hundred years ago the British empire began to colonize nearly every continent on earth, and to that purpose she naturally spread the English language as she did so. That language has, as a result, undone the work that was done by the Lord at Babel. It has now become the language of the human race for all practical purposes.
The very real 'threat' that it would have posed at Babel is now realised in our modern world.
Two hundred years ago the human race possessed only 5 major technologies that were used by all as a general rule.
1) Fire
2) The Wheel
3) The Sail
4) Guns
5) Gunpowder
We did not yet know how to harness steam to do work.
Steam was the foundation of heavy industry and the first step to all that has come since.
Where have we come since communications have been restored to humanity?
The airplane. Nuclear power and weapons, Computors, etc. and by far the gravest threat we have ever faced, Genetic engineering.
I classify genetic engineering as our most lethal threat because it is one humanity seems willing to embrace with open arms.
All other threats are recognized as danger. Genetic engineering is desired as a supposed benefit.
The next time you consider the Tower of Babel, count the 5,000 years from then until now now as a blessing.
If not for that act, you would never have been born.
Praise God!I don't know, but we know that God is omniscience (all knowing) and all wise. He did the right thing, that you can be assured.

Meraai vannie baai
Apr 24th 2009, 09:50 AM
©


en
so
is
daar
geskryf:
Genesis
11: 1-9
Een
volk
een
taal
saam
'n toring
begin bou
lymgrond
vir klei
en bakstene
vir bonsteen
'n Laagte
in die land
van Sínear
Mensekinders
smag na roem
reik na die sterre
Die Heer verwar taal
en het hul so verstrooi
........ Nimrod - Babilon .......
Wie sal die stad weer herbou?

Vhayes
Apr 24th 2009, 12:57 PM
Why the tower? What did they hope to accomplish?
I had always thought they were trying to reach God thereby making the tower the first "religion" if you will. Religion is always about trying to reach God; Christianity is about God reaching down to us.

RabbiKnife
Apr 24th 2009, 01:03 PM
Someone had to lay the foundation for "Stairway to Heaven."

-SEEKING-
Apr 24th 2009, 01:07 PM
Always wondered why God bothered to mix the languages of the human race. The fracturing of humanity certainly let to a great deal more violence on the earth and I would think history bears this out.

Praise God!

Hmm. Well Cain and Abel were brothers AND spoke the only language and they were already subject to quite a bit of knowledge.

NotMyOwn
Apr 24th 2009, 02:58 PM
I think the main concern of God was that mankind would become more prideful in what they accomplished and thereby would have no need for God in their lives.

Also the violence in the world would have come about regardless of the languages people spoke, because the lust for power would still exist because of mans sinfulness.

BrckBrln
Apr 24th 2009, 03:48 PM
I had always thought they were trying to reach God thereby making the tower the first "religion" if you will.

That's what I always assumed too, but it says that nowhere in the text. The Tower of Babel was most likely a Ziggurat, which was built so the gods could come down to earth, not man up to heaven.

Sojourner
Apr 24th 2009, 07:24 PM
Why the Tower?

I think that Nimrod was trying to invade the third heaven to overthrow God. I don't know.

BroRog
Apr 24th 2009, 07:38 PM
Perhaps one of the most bizzare stories in the bible is that of the Tower of Babel.
Always wondered why God bothered to mix the languages of the human race. The fracturing of humanity certainly let to a great deal more violence on the earth and I would think history bears this out.
Now Genesis 11: 9 leaves us with the thought that the Lord WANTED us to scatter over the face of the earth, and this event was acted out for THAT pupose. That was indeed the end result. But was it His purpose?
Rather than mix the languages of humanity, why didn't He just wait?
God knows the end from begining and always has.
History has shown us that men are eventually forced to migrate away from overcrowding and tyranny, and both would have taken place in short order, and God knew it.
Read the story in genesis 11:1-9
Being scattered is a concern of the men at Babel, and they say so.
Scattering the men at Babel is nowhere mentioned as God declares His concern, and HIS intention.
6And the Lord said, ‘Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
Come, let us go down, and confuse their language there, so that they will not understand one another’s speech.’
It was the ability they had to communicate with one another that He is addressing.
What threat did this pose?
"nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
That was a VERY REAL THREAT, one that the Lord posponed for nearly 5,000 years.
Two hundred years ago the British empire began to colonize nearly every continent on earth, and to that purpose she naturally spread the English language as she did so. That language has, as a result, undone the work that was done by the Lord at Babel. It has now become the language of the human race for all practical purposes.
The very real 'threat' that it would have posed at Babel is now realised in our modern world.
Two hundred years ago the human race possessed only 5 major technologies that were used by all as a general rule.
1) Fire
2) The Wheel
3) The Sail
4) Guns
5) Gunpowder
We did not yet know how to harness steam to do work.
Steam was the foundation of heavy industry and the first step to all that has come since.
Where have we come since communications have been restored to humanity?
The airplane. Nuclear power and weapons, Computors, etc. and by far the gravest threat we have ever faced, Genetic engineering.
I classify genetic engineering as our most lethal threat because it is one humanity seems willing to embrace with open arms.
All other threats are recognized as danger. Genetic engineering is desired as a supposed benefit.
The next time you consider the Tower of Babel, count the 5,000 years from then until now now as a blessing.
If not for that act, you would never have been born.
Praise God!

I think this post is insightful. If I understand you correctly, for some reason God was displeased with the idea that mankind, working together, would be unstoppable. And you are proposing that communication is a key function of a coordinated project of large proportions. Which explains why God made communication difficult.

Did I understand correctly?

BroRog
Apr 24th 2009, 07:40 PM
Hmm. Well Cain and Abel were brothers AND spoke the only language and they were already subject to quite a bit of knowledge.

How much could I learn if I lived 500 - 700 years?! :)

BroRog
Apr 24th 2009, 07:44 PM
I had always thought they were trying to reach God thereby making the tower the first "religion" if you will. Religion is always about trying to reach God; Christianity is about God reaching down to us.

Good point.

I know my idea isn't actually in the text, though I see hints of this, but I have often wondered if they weren't acting out of fear of another flood? Maybe they were trying to built something that would rise above the flood waters?

The stated reason for the tower was so that these men might make a name for themselves. But sometimes we find the truth when we read between the lines.

I don't know. Just speculating.

Fsbirdhouse
Apr 25th 2009, 01:02 AM
BroRog,
You are right in how you understand my post.
I wasn't so concerned about man's reason for building the tower, and I can't say I understand it entirely myself. Surely he must have known it wouldn't save him by any stretch.
But, and not to limit God's reasons for mixing the languages, I think we do not yet know all the things He accomplished by it, but in His quoted verse He makes no mention of doing it to scatter them, only that having a single language would enable them to do anything they chose.
By this I think He's saying it would pose a significant danger to themselves, else why such a profound interference in humanities situation?
Maybe the world we live in today is all the farther we have to look for the answer.

Fsbirdhouse
Apr 25th 2009, 01:12 AM
Seeking,
I guess you're right about violence coming in at the very begining, and the Lord speaks of violence in the earth just before the flood, as one reason for the flood itself.
The only thing history really bears out in the end is that we are certainly prone to violence, and lots of it.
A single language comes into its own by how we use worldwide communications, and by its seeming affect on exchanging ideas that lead to invention and technolgy.

NotMyOwn
Apr 25th 2009, 02:15 AM
I think this post is insightful. If I understand you correctly, for some reason God was displeased with the idea that mankind, working together, would be unstoppable. And you are proposing that communication is a key function of a coordinated project of large proportions. Which explains why God made communication difficult.

Did I understand correctly?

I wonder why God would be worried about man being able to anything, unless it pertains to mans worship of God himself.

THOM
Apr 25th 2009, 04:44 AM
Perhaps one of the most bizzare stories in the bible is that of the Tower of Babel.
Always wondered why God bothered to mix the languages of the human race. The fracturing of humanity certainly let to a great deal more violence on the earth and I would think history bears this out.
Now Genesis 11: 9 leaves us with the thought that the Lord WANTED us to scatter over the face of the earth, and this event was acted out for THAT pupose. That was indeed the end result. But was it His purpose?
Rather than mix the languages of humanity, why didn't He just wait?
God knows the end from begining and always has.
History has shown us that men are eventually forced to migrate away from overcrowding and tyranny, and both would have taken place in short order, and God knew it.
Read the story in genesis 11:1-9
Being scattered is a concern of the men at Babel, and they say so.
Scattering the men at Babel is nowhere mentioned as God declares His concern, and HIS intention.
6And the Lord said, ‘Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
Come, let us go down, and confuse their language there, so that they will not understand one another’s speech.’
It was the ability they had to communicate with one another that He is addressing.
What threat did this pose?
"nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.
That was a VERY REAL THREAT, one that the Lord posponed for nearly 5,000 years.
Two hundred years ago the British empire began to colonize nearly every continent on earth, and to that purpose she naturally spread the English language as she did so. That language has, as a result, undone the work that was done by the Lord at Babel. It has now become the language of the human race for all practical purposes.
The very real 'threat' that it would have posed at Babel is now realised in our modern world.
Two hundred years ago the human race possessed only 5 major technologies that were used by all as a general rule.
1) Fire
2) The Wheel
3) The Sail
4) Guns
5) Gunpowder
We did not yet know how to harness steam to do work.
Steam was the foundation of heavy industry and the first step to all that has come since.
Where have we come since communications have been restored to humanity?
The airplane. Nuclear power and weapons, Computors, etc. and by far the gravest threat we have ever faced, Genetic engineering.
I classify genetic engineering as our most lethal threat because it is one humanity seems willing to embrace with open arms.
All other threats are recognized as danger. Genetic engineering is desired as a supposed benefit.
The next time you consider the Tower of Babel, count the 5,000 years from then until now now as a blessing.
If not for that act, you would never have been born.
Praise God!

This is fantastic. I can see every bit of what you've so sincerely expressed here.

The only thing that I can think of now, is that GOD did what HE did, because of, first and foremost, their motivation for doing it, ". . .let us build us a city and a tower, whose top [may reach] unto heaven; and let us make us a name..."; I think they may have wanted to make the wrong "name". . .and they would have killed themselves in the process. . .after all, wherever "slime" is found, is not oil there?

Veretax
Apr 28th 2009, 12:19 PM
I've kind of studied this recently in my daily bible reading and reviewing 1 corinthians, and I see the babling at babel as a judgment from God. For what? Pride, for one. Did God maybe want them to scatter to the ends of the earth too? sure I think he did, but I think that it was the sin in their hearts that brought the judgement of God upon him.

daughter
Apr 28th 2009, 01:26 PM
©




en
so
is
daar
geskryf:
Genesis
11: 1-9
Een
volk
een
taal
saam
'n toring
begin bou
lymgrond
vir klei
en bakstene
vir bonsteen
'n Laagte
in die land
van Sínear
Mensekinders
smag na roem
reik na die sterre
Die Heer verwar taal
en het hul so verstrooi
........ Nimrod - Babilon .......
Wie sal die stad weer herbou?

Is hierdie jou gedig? Kan Ek vertaal dit binne-in engels? Ek hou van dit!

BroRog
Apr 28th 2009, 02:47 PM
I wonder why God would be worried about man being able to anything, unless it pertains to mans worship of God himself.

In my opinion, I think God is teaching mankind to accept and acknowledge his limits and finiteness. As humans, our natural tendency is toward becoming like God, who is limitless, unbounded, eternal and ineffable. And in our frustration we attempt to live above and beyond our capabilities as individual human beings to compensate for our individual lack of infinitude, by extending our influence collectively. If we work together, we say to ourselves, we can thwart the ravages of time and ruin, which plague finite creatures like ourselves. Working together we can transcend our humanity and alleviate the frustrations of living as limited creatures in a dying world.

Solomon says that we have "the eternal" in our hearts. And we seek to become eternal in the things we do. Those who can afford it, want to leave a legacy of themselves behind after they die. Even our desire for children can be an effort to extend our influence beyond our own, limited, lifetime.

God is offering the gift of eternal life to whomever wants it, but on his terms not ours. He wants us to learn that he is the source of life and he is the one who preserves people and things for eternity. Working together, we human beings want to circumvent that process and tell God where he can put his offer.

Scruffy Kid
Apr 28th 2009, 02:57 PM
The story of the tower of Babel, I think, recapitulates the story of the fall in Genesis 3.

In Genesis 3, the man and woman are forbidden to "eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil" warned that doing so will lead to their destruction. They disobey this command, motivated by the serpent's tempting claim that if they eat of the tree they will "be like God, knowing good and evil" and will "be wise". The result of their disobedience, though, is not wisdom, but total confusion. They are alienated, and unable to communicate constructively with each other, God, or the creation of which they were, previously, the masters, namers, tamers, and lords. Their attempt to take into their own hands the power to define what is right and wrong, and thus to take the place in God, results not in their exultation, but in their fall and humiliation; not in the knowledgableness they thought they would gain, but rather in confusion and inability to be clear about themselves, or to communicate effectively. The result, in the next generation (Abel and Cain) results in a deeper level of alienation from the creation, human nature, and the land: Cain is a wanderer, in the land of wandering (Nod), a fugitive on the face of the earth, and tries, instead to found a city, named after his son.

In Genesis 11, we see the outworkings of this kind of self-exaltation, and attempt to understand and define reality apart from God.

Central to the Babel account, IMO, is the fact that the men of Babel want "to make a name for themselves." The importance and centrality of this intention on their part is emphasized by the construction of the passage in its whole context. The Babel story is bracketed by two genealogies.
(1) Genesis 10 gives the genealogies of Noah's sons, Ham, Japheth, and Shem, ending with the genealogy of Shem. These are branching (fissiparous) genealogies: they give all Japheth's sons, then the sons of each of them, and so on. This ends with a branching genealogy of Noah's son Shem.
(2) Then comes the Tower of Babel.
(3) After the Babel account, Genesis 11 again gives a genealogy for Shem, Shem alone, but this is a linear genealogy, not a branching one: it gives only those descendants who constitute the Abrahamic line, the line from Noah to Abraham, and none of the side branches.
(4) Finally in Genesis 12, we have the call of Abraham, which is the start of salvation-history proper, the beginning of God establishing a people for Himself, out of whom will come the Messiah, Christ, the Savior of the world. God says to Abram, in fact "I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing ... and by you all the families of the earth will bless themselves." Finally, in order to see the centrality of "make a name for ourselves" we need to realize that the name of Noah's son Shem is itself the Hebrew word for "name": "ha Shem" means "the Name." Thus the line of descendants that leads from Noah to Abraham, the line of Shem, is the line of "the Name": Abraham is the father of faith, through whom all the families of the earth will be blessed, the people of God to whom God's name is to be revealed, and from whom will come Jesus whose name is above every name.

Clearly, an account of the men of Babel seeking to "make a name for themselves" flanked by two geneologies of "the name" which finally leads to the start of salvation history in which God tells his chosen man Abram (renamed by God as Abraham) that He will make his name great, and a blessing, clearly such an account is fundamentally revolving round the concept of the name and naming.

The men of Babel are -- in several ways -- usurping God's prerogatives. First they are making a tower which reaches to heaven; that is, they are seeking, on their own, to ascend to God's place, they are in effect taking heaven by storm, or seeking to put themselves where God is, to usurp his power and authority. Second, they are seeking to become the masters of their own identity: rather than receiving God's definition of who they are, rather than receiving a name and identity from God, they are seeking to define themselves, and define themselves as glorious: seeking to make a name for themselves.

all the families of the earth, all the nations of the earth, may be blessed. God, "the father from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named" (Eph. 3), rather than acquiescing to the exalted identity that the men of Babel wish to make for themselves, gives Abraham, who will live as a lowly wanderer without a home throughout this life, a name which God exalts, and through which all the families of the earth will bless themselves.]

What the men of Babel do recapitulates the Fall, on a collective and social level. In seeking to take and to "eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil" the first human beings are, in effect (I think) seeking to take into their own hands the power to define right and wrong. Both in what they do, disobeying God, and in the image of taking and eating of the tree of knowledge of good and evil, they are exalting themselves to God's place, rebelling against God, denying God's wisdom. Adam and Eve are seeking to define themselves, independently of God, just as the men of Babel seek to "make a name for themselves." They do this tempted by the evil one, the serpent, who denies what God said, and specifically tells them that in eating they will "be like God" so that the woman desires to eat of the tree to make herself "wise". The power that comes from knowledge, and the self-exaltation and power to define oneself, are motives for the first human pair, as for the men of Babel.

And the results are similar. Where Adam and Eve seek wisdom, they instead reap confusion, and disunity. They hide. They blame. Their unity with one another and God is broken. They are alienated from one another and God, and "scattered": driven from the garden, with Cain then -- by the violence of his alienation from and disunity with his brother Abel -- making himself a wanderer on the face of the earth. In just the same way, the men of Babel disunify themselves where they sought to find unity in their exalted collective identity, confuse themselves and their ability to be with one another, and abase, rather than exalt, themselves in the process.

These stories also look forward to God's remedy and contrast human fallenness with God's goodness. The results of the confusion of language in Genesis 11 finds its healing and reversal in the coming of the spirit in Acts 2, in which the believers are united in heart and mind, and yet are given words with which to speak to people of every tongue and language and nation, so that each may hear in their own language the marvelous works of God.

And the destructive, separating, alienating proud actions of the first human beings, and of the men of Babel, find their antithesis in Christ Jesus, who being God, humbles himself, empties himself, to be born in a manger as "God with us", and to die in our place upon the cross (Phil. 2). It is through all this that God highly exalts him, and gives him "the name which is above every name", through which all the nations and families of the earth may be blessed, as in Christ's name and by his resurrection power all learn, likewise, to live in humility, to bow, to count others better than themselves, and to glorify God the Father.

RabbiKnife
Apr 28th 2009, 04:52 PM
The problem with Babel was that it was contradictory to what God told man to do.

God told man to be fruitful and fill the earth. At Babel, they decided to stop filling, stay put, and do man's thing.

God has a way of fixing that.

Lefty
May 8th 2009, 06:59 AM
The problem with Babel was that it was contradictory to what God told man to do.

God told man to be fruitful and fill the earth. At Babel, they decided to stop filling, stay put, and do man's thing.

God has a way of fixing that.

I agree this is the right answer.

God to Noah; "Be fruitful and increase in number and fill the Earth." Gen. 9:1 and repeated in 9:7.

"Now the whole world had one language and a common speech. As men moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there." Gen 11:1-2

"Then they said "Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves and not be scattered over the face of the whole Earth." Gen 11:4

That was the problem, they just weren't moving. I think it was God's plan that Noah's descendents migrate outwards in separate groups, both to enjoy the creation he provided for them, and also to form diversity among the human race. All his creation is diverse, why not man too?

The tower reaching to the "heavens" was no threat to God;), and noticed he didn't destroy it or punish anyone for building it. What he did was give them new languages; a brilliant solution. A gentle and loving reminder of what he'd told Noah should be done.

Now the whole Earth is filled. The age of exploration is past. This should be some indication of how we sit in the timeline of human history. We're getting close. There's much diversity too, and I think it's the church's job to try to bring unity from that diversity. Unity in Christ.

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