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bagofseed
Apr 27th 2009, 03:13 AM
What does it mean to be a law unto your self?

Sojourner
Apr 27th 2009, 08:27 AM
"For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves:Which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and [their] thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another" Romans 2:14&15

Just suppling the text

A820djd
Apr 27th 2009, 04:11 PM
Anyone want to explain what it means please?

-SEEKING-
Apr 27th 2009, 04:18 PM
Read "Mere Christianity" by C.S. Lewis to get a really good idea.

Basically God's laws are in our hearts. So even if we aren't following a law per se, like the Hebrews, or following Jesus, our conciences will let us know if our actions are right or wrong.

keck553
Apr 27th 2009, 04:19 PM
And now we know why folks, there are 30,000 sects of Christianity. Each following their own image of the Holy Spirit.

Bandit
Apr 27th 2009, 04:32 PM
What does it mean to be a law unto your self?


"For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves:Which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and [their] thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another" Romans 2:14&15

Just suppling the text


Anyone want to explain what it means please?


Well, the interpretation would be based upon the context. For starters, who do you think the "gentiles" are in this context? Are they saved, Christian gentiles, or are they unsaved gentiles? Your ultimate interpretation will depend upon who you think Paul is talking about when he says, "gentiles". Personally, I believe Paul is speaking of unsaved gentiles, so that leads me to a certain interpretation for the text. Others, who understand the implication of having this verse address unsaved gentiles (and who's theology may not allow such an implication), say Christian gentiles are in view. Romans 2 (as much of Romans as a whole) is the subject of much debate.

bagofseed
Apr 28th 2009, 01:00 AM
To become a law unto your self is the work of salvation.

To do by nature (naturally) the things contained in the law

Law for the saints is about keeping Love from a pure heart a sincere faith and a good conscience towards God.

Jesus is our way!
Jesus is our truth!
Jesus is our life!

How great a treasure in earthen vessels!
Through Jesus Holy Spirit we can become partakers of the divine nature of God!

bagofseed
Apr 28th 2009, 01:02 AM
And now we know why folks, there are 30,000 sects of Christianity. Each following their own image of the Holy Spirit.
Yes, God thought it best to let the tares grow in amongst the wheat.

BroRog
Apr 28th 2009, 05:11 AM
"For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves:Which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and [their] thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another" Romans 2:14&15

Just suppling the text

We need to widen the context to get the point.

This verse falls in a section in which Paul puts the Mosaic Law in perspective as it pertains to what he just said.

In the previous section Paul declared that God was going to reward those who are in pursuit of the good and punish those who are in pursuit of evil, judging us based on our deeds. Whether we are Jew or Gentile, tribulation and distress will come to those who pursue evil; glory, honor, and immortality to those who pursue the good. He tops off his point by saying that God will be impartial when he judges.

The question which follows is this. What about the law? It would appear as if God was showing partiality when he gave his law to the Jews but not to everyone else. If we are going to be judge according to our deeds, and if God is going to be impartial when he judges, don't the Jews have an advantage when it comes to knowing the good? If God is going to judge in favor of those who pursue the good, and if God has given the Jews his oracles defining his idea of what good is, doesn't this give the Jews a decided, definite advantage over other people?

He answers,

First point: doers not hearers

For there is no partiality with God. For all who have sinned without the Law will also perish without the Law, and all who have sinned under the Law will be judged by the Law; for it is not the hearers of the Law who are just before God, but the doers of the Law will be justified.



In Paul's day, the world was divided up into two groups: those who have never heard or read God's law; and those who went to synagogue every Sabbath and heard it. The assumption is that since those who attend synagogue every Sabbath are privileged to hear the law, they might have some kind of advantage over those who didn't. But the reality of the situation was much different, seeing that both groups perish; those without the law perish, as we might expect, but those with the law are perishing too due to the fact that, while hearing the law each week might be an advantage, it doesn't do them any good if they don't also obey it.



Second point: Though the Gentiles are uneducated with respect to the law of Moses, they are not without a law of their own, which is similar enough to convict one of sin.



For when Gentiles who do not have the Law do instinctively the things of the Law, these, not having the Law, are a law to themselves, in that they show the work of the Law written in their hearts, their conscience bearing witness and their thoughts alternately accusing or else defending them, on the day when, according to my gospel, God will judge the secrets of men through Christ Jesus.



Granting for the sake of his discourse that Gentiles do not have the Law of Moses, he posits that Gentiles instinctively, (i.e. without formal training) already know right from wrong. They have a conscience, which accuses and/or defends them by the same moral standards that the Jews recognize by formal training. And so they too must face the choice whether to merely hear the law or also hear and obey.


When he says that the Gentiles are a law unto themselves, he is using the term "law" in an unusual sense to indicate those who, though they don't have formal training in God's commands, actually obey some of the moral imparitives of the Law instinctively. And so, having the Mosaic Law isn't much of an advantage to our seeking the good as we might, at first, suspect. Some Jews hear the law but don't do it; while some Gentiles never hear the law, but do it anyway instinctively.

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