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ZAB
May 6th 2009, 06:47 PM
Hello friends,

I am curious of what you all think of the tabernacle of David and it's relevance to us today. In a nutshell, this tabernacle replaced that of Moses and speaks of the New Covenant economy. There was no veil in this tabernacle; it was prophetic of our coming access (Jew and Gentile) into the holiest by the blood of Jesus (Heb 9:8; 6:19-20; Acts 15:14-16). This tabernacle instituted worship 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Amos 9:11-12 reads, "In that day will I raise up the tabernacle of David that is fallen, and close up the breaches thereof; and I will raise up his ruins, and I will build it as in the days of old: That they may possess the remnant of Edom, and of all the heathen, which are called by my name, saith the LORD that doeth this."

There are basically 2 opposing viewpoints on this matter (there may be more):

(1) The tabernacle of David is to be lived out spiritually speaking in the lives of every believer. We are to "walk in the spirit" 24/7 and fulfil not the lusts of the flesh (Gal 5:16, 25; etc), and press into the New Covenant realities that have been provided to us.
(2) The tabernacle of David is a natural and physical thing that is to be restructured in the last days and physically lived out, i.e. literal 24/7 prayer and worship. There are "houses of prayer" after this model all over the world right now, a very significant one being in Kansas City, MO.

Thoughts?

John146
May 6th 2009, 07:01 PM
Hello friends,

I am curious of what you all think of the tabernacle of David and it's relevance to us today. In a nutshell, this tabernacle replaced that of Moses and speaks of the New Covenant economy. There was no veil in this tabernacle; it was prophetic of our coming access (Jew and Gentile) into the holiest by the blood of Jesus (Heb 9:8; 6:19-20; Acts 15:15-16). This tabernacle instituted worship 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Amos 9:11-12 reads, "In that day will I raise up the tabernacle of David that is fallen, and close up the breaches thereof; and I will raise up his ruins, and I will build it as in the days of old: That they may possess the remnant of Edom, and of all the heathen, which are called by my name, saith the LORD that doeth this."

There are basically 2 opposing viewpoints on this matter (there may be more):

(1) The tabernacle of David is to be lived out spiritually speaking in the lives of every believer. We are to "walk in the spirit" 24/7 and fulfil not the lusts of the flesh (Gal 5:16, 25; etc), and press into the New Covenant realities that have been provided to us.
(2) The tabernacle of David is a natural and physical thing that is to be restructured in the last days and physically lived out, i.e. literal 24/7 prayer and worship. There are "houses of prayer" after this model all over the world right now, a very significant one being in Kansas City, MO.

Thoughts?I agree with viewpoint #1 because that is the context in which the passage from Amos 9:11-12 is discussed within Acts 15.

markedward
May 6th 2009, 07:04 PM
There are "houses of prayer" after this model all over the world right now, a very significant one being in Kansas City, MO.This has my "warning light" going off.

What is so "very significant" about some "house of prayer" (a church building?) in Kansas City, and why is it better (by the mere fact that you mentioned it) than other ones?

Sojourner
May 6th 2009, 07:38 PM
The tabernacle of David is his flesh and blood body.

"What? know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own?" I Cor. 6:19

"Jesus answered and said unto them, Destroy this temple (Jesus' body) , and in three days I will raise it up." John 2:19

IMHO

ZAB
May 6th 2009, 07:46 PM
This has my "warning light" going off.

What is so "very significant" about some "house of prayer" (a church building?) in Kansas City, and why is it better (by the mere fact that you mentioned it) than other ones?

Well, it's quite simple. By "houses of prayer", I am not referring to a church. I am referring to a building, where they have instituted prayer/worship around the clock, 24/7. Believers from several church backgrounds tend to be a part, not a single church.

"Very significant" does not mean "better". You seem somewhat defensive, and I'm not sure why? The "house of prayer" in Kansas City is significant because (1) I believe they were the first in the USA to do the 24/7 model, and (2) they are attatched to a Bible school, which raises up and sends out "intercessory missionaries" to other parts of the country and world to institute other "houses of prayer". There is one in my city (although it isnt very successful), that was begun by the one in Kansas.

ZAB
May 6th 2009, 07:57 PM
Proponents of this idea use the Scripture in Amos 9 (found in the above post) to explain the prophetic significance. Obviously, they interpret it literally.

Another Scripture used to sway Christians toward this Davidic model is found in Luke 2:36-37. It speaks of a widow named Anna, who departed not from the temple of God, but served God with fastings and prayers day and night.
They also use Revelation 8:1-5 to say that perpetual prayer/worship in this Davidic model will fascilitate worldwide revival. This, I am sure, is true, however, if we adhere to viewpoint #1, are we to dedicate such time and energy to something that exists outside of Biblical context? One place doing this, I heard pays $100k a month in electricity bills! WHOA! That's alot of watts :o. Is this fruitless? It's prayer and worship; It certainly couldn't hurt! What do you all think?

ZAB
May 9th 2009, 01:00 PM
What do you guys think? Is this outside of Biblical context?
Have you ever heard of the International House of Prayer (IHOP)? They have a website, www.ihop.org (http://www.ihop.org). Check it out and let us know what you think of the whole thing.

Blessings.

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