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mfowler12
Jun 18th 2008, 03:30 PM
I've been wanting to get opinions on a good study bible.

I've done daily bible readings with the NIV (on my second year) and plan on doing the NLT next year, but I also want to get some recommendations for an actual study bible that has plenty of information about the Word.

Would you be so kind to help?

Roelof
Jun 18th 2008, 03:35 PM
KJV Bible Commentary

John Wesley's Notes on E-sword

FoG
Jun 18th 2008, 03:39 PM
NKJV Study Bible (Nelson) and the Life Application Bible in your favorite version are good ones IMO. Life Application comes in KJV, NKJV, NLT, NIV, and NASB. I can't remember it in other versions, but they may be out there. These are the two study bibles I reach for when I am ready to dig in. ;)

IBWatching
Jun 18th 2008, 03:52 PM
(English Translations listed by Translation Availability/Title/Publisher)



Orthodox/Evangelical Protestant?:

NIV - NIV Study Bible by Zondervan
NASB - NASB Study Bible by Zondervan
NKJV - Open Bible (Nelson)
NIV/NAS/NKJV/KJV - Thompson Chain Reference Study Bible (Kirkbride)

Evangelical/Dispensational?:

KJV - Scofield Reference Edition Study Bible (Oxford)
KJV/NKJV/NIV/NASB - New Scofield Reference Edition Study Bible (Oxford)
ESV - New Scofield Study Bible III (Oxford)
NKJV - New NKJV Study Bible (Nelson - Edited by Earl Radmacher)
NASB - Ryrie Study Bible (Moody Press)

I either own/or have owned many of these. All have extensive study helps and footnotes. Hard Covers cost around $40, Leather Bound start around $60

:)

mfowler12
Jun 18th 2008, 04:03 PM
Orthodox/Evangelical Protestant?:
Evangelical/Dispensational?:

What's the difference?

Liv
Jun 18th 2008, 06:39 PM
I use the New Living Translation Life Application Study Bible. It's very easy to read so that the meaning of the verses is always crystal clear, and it has excellent commentary, charts, character profiles, etc.

GraftedIn
Jun 18th 2008, 07:00 PM
For the longest, I used a Thompson Chain KJV...very good bible, and a Hebrew Greek Key Word Study bible.

I just found a KJV Open Bible and I LOVE IT!!!:pp This study bible has been on the market so long I can't imagine how I missed it all of these years. It has a sweet cyclopedic index at the front, thorough outlines and introductions that are WAY more helpful than my Thompson's and it still manages not to be to loaded with commentary. The commentary at the bottom of a few of the pages are more geared toward new believers rather than swaying you to believe a specific doctrine. It comes in NASB and NKJV. It's hard to find a regular size KJV, but the large print one is easy to spot.

Let me know what you think!

FoG
Jun 18th 2008, 08:05 PM
For the longest, I used a Thompson Chain KJV...very good bible, and a Hebrew Greek Key Word Study bible.

I just found a KJV Open Bible and I LOVE IT!!!:pp This study bible has been on the market so long I can't imagine how I missed it all of these years. It has a sweet cyclopedic index at the front, thorough outlines and introductions that are WAY more helpful than my Thompson's and it still manages not to be to loaded with commentary. The commentary at the bottom of a few of the pages are more geared toward new believers rather than swaying you to believe a specific doctrine. It comes in NASB and NKJV. It's hard to find a regular size KJV, but the large print one is easy to spot.

Let me know what you think!




My daddy gave me his KJV Open study bible at least 20 years ago. I agree it is a good one.

GraftedIn
Jun 19th 2008, 02:33 AM
My daddy gave me his KJV Open study bible at least 20 years ago. I agree it is a good one.


Your dad is a GREAT man and deserves many -->:hug:s. I wish someone would have taken me under the wing...would have saved me thousands of dollars. I spent so much money on study bibles, only to settle down with parallel bibles and study bibles with VERY limited commentary. I wish someone had bought me an Open Bible and a set of commentaries long ago.:spin:

FoG
Jun 19th 2008, 03:44 AM
Your dad is a GREAT man and deserves many -->:hug:s. I wish someone would have taken me under the wing...would have saved me thousands of dollars. I spent so much money on study bibles, only to settle down with parallel bibles and study bibles with VERY limited commentary. I wish someone had bought me an Open Bible and a set of commentaries long ago.:spin:


Yes he is, and the Bibles he has given me are so precious to me! Now some of them look like they are about to fall all to pieces, but that makes them even better. :)

My heart's Desire
Jun 19th 2008, 06:37 AM
the NASB of course in your favorite flavor! The open Bibles are good too!

DadBurnett
Jun 19th 2008, 07:00 AM
Good study Bible? It looks like your rec’d several good recommendations. My counsel would be, don’t limit yourself to only a couple of translations, comparison is good (even necessary). There are several parallel Bibles available that make comparisons easier. I’ve used many different translations to nourish my spirit and am now exploring “The Message.” I’m not sure how well it is received by others, but it is thought provoking. You might ask, Why compare? The simple truth is that each translation was done for a purpose by people who felt that existing translations were perhaps “not quite right” in some way or another, that they, following their inspiration could clarify things a little bit better, could somehow better explain or say “it” better in the current vernacular. One last thought … I think that any translation, prayerfully read with a mind open to Spirit’s guidance can and will reveal the Lord and draw us into a deeper relationship with the Lord of our salvation. The Spirit, not the book itself, will teach us.

9Marksfan
Jun 19th 2008, 09:19 AM
Although it's not out till later this year, the ESV Study Bible looks like becoming one of the best ever. I also recommend the MacArthur Study Bible (NKJV or NASB, depending on your preference).

9Marksfan
Jun 19th 2008, 09:24 AM
What's the difference?

The second has a strong Dispensationalist emphasis ie it will stress a pre-tribulational rapture and will have a very particular slant on prophetic passages that many evangelical Protestants disagree with - I would stick with the Orthodox/Evangelical Protestant if I were you.

obeytheword
Jun 19th 2008, 01:29 PM
I've been wanting to get opinions on a good study bible.

I've done daily bible readings with the NIV (on my second year) and plan on doing the NLT next year, but I also want to get some recommendations for an actual study bible that has plenty of information about the Word.

Would you be so kind to help?

I believe a few have mentioned the NKJV Nelson. This is a good one - and the one I use the most these days.

I used to have a Life application NIV - and I found it to have rather watered down commentary to be honest. Also, was rather slanted, and interpretive, rather than informative if that makes sense. It was ok for me for a bit when I was a new believer, but over time, I got to where I wanted to dig in a bit more, and I switched.

Though I certainly do not limit myself - I have several other study bibles in the house, and also PC Study bible by biblesoft is good for some more detailed study - preparing for sermon, etc.

Be Blessed!

mfowler12
Jun 19th 2008, 01:39 PM
What is so special about an open bible?

How different is the NKJV and the KJV? I'm not big on the style of language so I prefer to have something in today's terms. I'd hate to ask which version I should read since that appears to be a big dispute among everybody. So, my question, is the NKJV language better?

9Marksfan
Jun 19th 2008, 01:55 PM
What is so special about an open bible?

How different is the NKJV and the KJV? I'm not big on the style of language so I prefer to have something in today's terms. I'd hate to ask which version I should read since that appears to be a big dispute among everybody. So, my question, is the NKJV language better?

It's much more contemporary, while retaining the accuracy of the KJV - it's really an updated KJV (which was written in a language that is almost 400 years out of date! I really don't think anyone can understand all the words in the KJV unless they've been brought up on it and had the archaic words explained Sunday by Sunday - or if they've done an English Language degree!).

obeytheword
Jun 19th 2008, 03:10 PM
What is so special about an open bible?

How different is the NKJV and the KJV? I'm not big on the style of language so I prefer to have something in today's terms. I'd hate to ask which version I should read since that appears to be a big dispute among everybody. So, my question, is the NKJV language better?

That is honestly the beauty of the NKJV in my personal opinion. It DOES retain a rather poetic element that some of the more modern translations lack (NASB being one that comes to mind especially)

It is essentially a modernized KJV. They mainly used the same sources, etc.

It is obviously disputed - but some of the main translations I have heard are something like this.

The reading levels

Message - 4th grade
NLT - 5th grade
NIV 6th - 7th grade
NKJV - 7th grade
NASB - 10th
KJV - 12th

The grade level being the level at which someone can REALLY GET IT - and not be tripped up and easily misunderstand things gramatically at least.

The NASB for example is GREAT for word study in all honesty - but I do not prefer it for reading - as the translation style makes many of the sentences when translated word for word into english rather clunky.

The NLT is a very easy read, but a rather large amount of interpretation is put in there by the translators who are trying to make it easier to read and understand.

I personally believe the NKJV is one of the best mixes - it is still a word for word translation - and very accurate - but it flows much more nicely than most translations.

Be Blessed!

mfowler12
Jun 19th 2008, 05:14 PM
I believe a few have mentioned the NKJV Nelson. This is a good one - and the one I use the most these days.

I used to have a Life application NIV - and I found it to have rather watered down commentary to be honest. Also, was rather slanted, and interpretive, rather than informative if that makes sense. It was ok for me for a bit when I was a new believer, but over time, I got to where I wanted to dig in a bit more, and I switched.

Though I certainly do not limit myself - I have several other study bibles in the house, and also PC Study bible by biblesoft is good for some more detailed study - preparing for sermon, etc.

Be Blessed!
I'm looking at Biblesoft.com and comparing their latest Version 5 with all of their flavors and really all that I would want to spend on that is the cheapest one. Would you recommend that route or prefer an actual bible? I have to admit that having everything in one spot is a lot easier for me because I'm not much for physical research (reading through books multiple times). Are there any other programs out there that may do this same thing?

What exactly is word study?

Should I stay away from commentaries? If no, what type of commentaries should I look at or will most study bibles already have that information included?

obeytheword
Jun 19th 2008, 06:48 PM
I'm looking at Biblesoft.com and comparing their latest Version 5 with all of their flavors and really all that I would want to spend on that is the cheapest one. Would you recommend that route or prefer an actual bible? I have to admit that having everything in one spot is a lot easier for me because I'm not much for physical research (reading through books multiple times). Are there any other programs out there that may do this same thing?

What exactly is word study?

Should I stay away from commentaries? If no, what type of commentaries should I look at or will most study bibles already have that information included?

Lots of good questions here!

I would say if you are a bit strapped for cash, you will be far better to get a solid study bible - and use online resources for any more detailed research. http://www.biblegateway.com (http://www.biblegateway.com/) This site will let you look at most of the versions out there for free online. For starters, it might not be a bad place to read some passages in different translations, to get a feel for them. Just keep in mind that in some that look "easier" to read - the translaters take some liberty and they put opinions in there.

There are a lot of other great online resources to do detailed study - just have to be careful, because every crazy person who owns a bible can set up a website, and put all kinds of junk in there that could easily lead you astray.

Having everything together - lots of nifty links, all kinds of greek/hebrew stuff, multiple commentaries is real nice, but the smaller libraries are honestly not worth it in my personal opinion.

There are a few other options like QuickVerse that may be priced better, but have not used them. Also is it e-sword that is the free one many people like? Have not used it, but I think many people like it.

A word study is where you will try and pin down the exact meaning of a word. For example where an english bible will use the word "love" - in the greek language there are 3 (or maybe 4, cannot remember the 4th if there is one) different words that can be translated as love.

One being a "pure" love - i.e. of the mind/will (Agape)

One being an erotic or fleshly love (eros)

One being a brotherly love (phileo)

Knowing which one is being used can GREATLY change the meaning of a verse.

If you read John 21:15-17. In your bible it will read that Jesus asked peter three times "do you love me" - and the first 2 times Peter said "yes, I love you" - the final time he got his feelings hurt...

What is says in greek is.

Jesus: Do you Agape me?
Peter: Yes I Phileo you

Jesus: Do you Agape me?
Peter: Yes I Phileo you

Jesus: Do you Phileo me?

Do you see how that radically changes how one could interpret that passage? It adds several layers of meaning. Having a fairly literal or at least a word by word translation leads itself to being able to more easily do a word study. A paraphrase bible is much harder to pin down exact meanings of words.


Commentaries - Honestly, I very seldom use them more than in passing. Many Many commentaries are good - don't get me wrong, but I have found most rely far too much on "head knowledge". I attempt to stay connected to the Holy Spirit, and let him do the interpretation of difficult passages. Others may tell you different - but my opinion is NEVER read a commentary about a passage before you have read through it several times yourself, and through prayer and meditation gained some insight directly from God.

Feel free to send me a PM any time - I would be happy to help you get going on some serious study!!

Be Blessed!

Reynolds357
Jun 19th 2008, 07:26 PM
Although it's not out till later this year, the ESV Study Bible looks like becoming one of the best ever. I also recommend the MacArthur Study Bible (NKJV or NASB, depending on your preference).
Unfortunately, MacArthur leans heavily anti-pentecostal.

mfowler12
Jun 19th 2008, 07:55 PM
I would say if you are a bit strapped for cash, you will be far better to get a solid study bible - and use online resources for any more detailed research.

Strapped for cash isn't an issue, but paying almost $100 is not something I look forward to unless it is a high quality product.

However, since you've used the program, what do you think about the "Discovery" option? Would you recommend the next option up even though it is more expensive?


I think I like the idea of having a computer program that contains a lot of this stuff. I also like having multiple versions available so that I can check with the others.

Does anybody have an experience with eSword, Biblesoft, QuickVerse, etc.? Any recommendations?

IBWatching
Jun 19th 2008, 08:30 PM
What's the difference?

The Evangelical/Dispensational versions will contain pre-millennial thought in their footnotes and comments. Some Orthodox Evangelicals might prefer versions with no eschatological bias in them.


Does anybody have an experience with eSword, Biblesoft, QuickVerse, etc.? Any recommendations?

I use eSword. It is free (except for some version add-ons) and offers some classical works to go along with the Bible versions. I agree with obeytheword above. You are better off getting a hard copy version then using online helps such as eSword to assist when the going gets tough.

obeytheword
Jun 19th 2008, 09:17 PM
Strapped for cash isn't an issue, but paying almost $100 is not something I look forward to unless it is a high quality product.

However, since you've used the program, what do you think about the "Discovery" option? Would you recommend the next option up even though it is more expensive?


I think I like the idea of having a computer program that contains a lot of this stuff. I also like having multiple versions available so that I can check with the others.

Does anybody have an experience with eSword, Biblesoft, QuickVerse, etc.? Any recommendations?

Understand about not wanting to pay more. I got my copy via a gift for Christmas - my parents and my wife went together and got it for me. I love the program, and it is invaluable - but not sure I would have forked out that much myself. (one of the things that made it a great gift :pp

I would say each jump is "worth" it only if you want (and will use) the stuff. I think at the end of the day it will boil down to personal preference.

I would say rather than getting the 2 smallest libraries - I would try out something like e-sword, and some online resources - and get a good hard copy study bible.

In my opinion, PC Study bible does not shine until you get toward the larger libraries - because there are free or cheaper resources that have what the smaller libraries have (like e-sword).

Don't get me wrong, it is a great product - I just think it does not get "worth it" until you get into the bigger libraries.

The only way I would consider the $100 version is if you have a laptop, and take it around with you all the time - but again, back to personal preference really. I would try e-sword before I did anything and see how you like it - I have heard from a few people who really like it.

Be Blessed!

mfowler12
Jun 19th 2008, 09:38 PM
I use eSword. It is free (except for some version add-ons) and offers some classical works to go along with the Bible versions. I agree with obeytheword above. You are better off getting a hard copy version then using online helps such as eSword to assist when the going gets tough.

What would you recommend for the extras? I figure NKJV, NIV, and NLT for the bibles unless I have forgotten anything.

What's the difference between the NKJV Nelson Classic and the this one? http://search.barnesandnoble.com/NKJV-The-Open-Bible/Nelson-Bible/e/9780718018108

DadBurnett, thanks for the advice. I'm going to assume that by comparing translations, you mean when I am studying a paticular verse or chapter? Or, do you mean to read over a couple different translations and then study from there having each version on my mind?

My heart's Desire
Jun 19th 2008, 09:59 PM
I'd still say NASB all the way. But, I agree the NKJV is AOK too
Do get a good Concordance. Exhaustive one. You might remember how you want to know where the verse is and all you can think of is one or 2 words of it? That's where a concordance comes in at. I love my bible but the concordance in it is lacking to me so I got the Strongs!

mfowler12
Aug 7th 2008, 08:03 PM
I just got the Nelson NKJV study bible and I am disappointed there wasn't a one year timeline showing a way to read this bible in one year (or other time frames). Would anybody have an idea on how to split this paticular book apart?

scourge39
Aug 7th 2008, 08:13 PM
Save your money and get the ESV Study Bible when it comes out in November. It features Smith sewn binding, which means the pages won't fall out, all full-color maps, single-column ESV translation of Scripture and EXHAUSTIVE study notes from Evangelical scholars of various traditions (some of whom I know personally and studied under in seminary). I've seen sample pages. It's definitely the cadillac of Study Bibles. The other forthcoming publishers have their work cut out for them if they plan on surpassing it. This will put the NIV Study Bible to shame. I promise. The ESV is an Evangelical revision of the Revised Standard Version (RSV) and is quickly surpassing the NASB as the translation of choice among scholars, and rightly so. It's a much smoother read than the NASB as well as the only translation that serves both as a good Study Bible and a good preaching Bible. My Greek Prof., William Mounce, served on the ESV Translation Oversight Committee.

http://www.esvstudybible.org/

godsgirl
Aug 7th 2008, 09:07 PM
I absolutly love my "Life in the Spirit" study Bible-I would have preferred NKJV over the KJV I bought-but the comentary is very good.

Lo-Lo
Aug 8th 2008, 02:08 AM
My husband bought me the John MacArthur NKJV Study Bible for my birthday last year because he wanted one. Turns out I love the Bible :pp ! I just wish he had bought it in leather bound instead of the hard cover. I really loved it so much, I bought him a leather bound NASB for Father's Day. Yes, he is gloating.............. :rofl:

9Marksfan
Aug 14th 2008, 09:42 PM
Unfortunately, MacArthur leans heavily anti-pentecostal.

He's still one of the best bible teachers around today - OK, so he's a bit anti-charismatic - but he's happy to share a platform with CJ Mahaney - it's really WoF that he's against - and what's wrong with being against that?!? ;)

scourge39
Aug 14th 2008, 09:55 PM
Although it's not out till later this year, the ESV Study Bible looks like becoming one of the best ever.

I second that observation! Here's more info:

http://www.esvstudybible.org/

poochie
Aug 14th 2008, 10:03 PM
I have heard that MacArthur's study bibles are the best. However I have never used them. I'd reccommend the Zondervan NIV study Bible as its the bst I've ever used.


I've been wanting to get opinions on a good study bible.

I've done daily bible readings with the NIV (on my second year) and plan on doing the NLT next year, but I also want to get some recommendations for an actual study bible that has plenty of information about the Word.

Would you be so kind to help?

poochie
Aug 14th 2008, 10:04 PM
MacArthur is against Charismatics also. But many are WOF.


He's still one of the best bible teachers around today - OK, so he's a bit anti-charismatic - but he's happy to share a platform with CJ Mahaney - it's really WoF that he's against - and what's wrong with being against that?!? ;)

9Marksfan
Aug 14th 2008, 10:29 PM
MacArthur is against Charismatics also. But many are WOF.

He can't be completely against them - CJ Mahaney is VERY charismatic! Don't throw out the baby with the bathwater - I totally disagree with his dispensationalism - but he's so good on everything else, so I just filter out the eschatology - you can filter ourt the anti-charismatic stuff too! :D