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View Full Version : Discussion Unsanctified Mercy?



mikebr
Jun 25th 2008, 05:43 PM
Anyone heard of this term? If I understand it correctly it means that we shouldn't show mercy only to those who deserve it?

"Unsanctified mercy is having mercy on what God is not having mercy on."

Pleroo
Jun 25th 2008, 06:26 PM
Anyone heard of this term? If I understand it correctly it means that we shouldn't show mercy only to those who deserve it?

"Unsanctified mercy is having mercy on what God is not having mercy on."

If mercy was only for those who "deserved" it, why would they need it? :)

No, I'm afraid I've not heard that term before.

mikebr
Jun 25th 2008, 06:33 PM
If mercy was only for those who "deserved" it, why would they need it? :)

No, I'm afraid I've not heard that term before.


I googled it an am amazed what people are saying. I agree with you wholeheartedly Pleroo.

markedward
Jun 25th 2008, 06:40 PM
Doesn't that completely go against "Love your enemy, pray for those who persecute you"?

mikebr
Jun 26th 2008, 03:30 AM
Doesn't that completely go against "Love your enemy, pray for those who persecute you"?

yep, nut its out there.

downpouredlife
Jul 1st 2008, 08:22 PM
Anyone heard of this term? If I understand it correctly it means that we shouldn't show mercy only to those who deserve it?

"Unsanctified mercy is having mercy on what God is not having mercy on."

The way I understand it, 'unsanctified mercy' refers to dealing out 'mercy' when discipline or judgement is required by God.

For example, in 1 Samuel 15, King Saul is commanded by God to attack the Amalekites and completely destroy them, sparing no one, man or beast (v.3). God says to do it because he is going to 'punish them for what they to Israel when they waylaid them as they were coming up from Egypt' (v3)

However, Saul spares the king, Agag, and the best of his cattle - the unsanctified mercy. For his sin, God rejects Saul as King of Israel. Saul confesses his sin, and then carries out the Lord's judgement on Agag.

So 'undeserved' has nothing to do with it - no one deserves mercy. It is when an unrepentant individual who has willfully sinned is shown mercy when God has said that they must be disciplined.

So say Hitler was pardoned for his war crimes, even though he was given many chances to back down. That would be unsanctified mercy. Or say a brother in the church willfully continues in an adulterous relationship and refuses to repent. Biblically, he should be asked to leave the church. Unsanctified mercy would be to pardon him, though he does not repent.

Friend of I AM
Aug 8th 2008, 03:24 PM
Downpoured's point is a good one. I think one can also look at "unsanctified mercy" though from a perspective of how they should go about demonstrating mercy to people who commit many offenses to us within our walks. There's an old saying that actually has a lot of truth to it, that being "fool me once, shame on you. fool me twice, shame on me." We need to be careful and use wisdom when discerning who we should be graceful/merciful with at times. Sometimes one can get so caught up with emotions and the moment, that they can be easily taken advantage of by an individual that doesn't have their best interests at heart when demonstrating grace, compassion, mercy upon them.