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mikebr
Jun 28th 2008, 01:14 PM
Why didn't Jesus condemn the woman caught in adultery when the law obviously did?

Kahtar
Jun 28th 2008, 01:16 PM
According to the law, there must be at least two witnesses to the event. Jesus was not a witness, thus according to the law, He could not bring a charge against her.Those that supposedly witnessed it left without bringing the charge.

Rullion Green
Jun 28th 2008, 01:21 PM
For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. John 3:17.

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost. Luke 19:10

The Son of God had a mission as stated in luke 19:10 and John 3:17 this was more important than condeming every sinner that came his way as his intention and greater purpose was to save them from their sin and reconcile them to God.

mikebr
Jun 28th 2008, 01:27 PM
According to the law, there must be at least two witnesses to the event. Jesus was not a witness, thus according to the law, He could not bring a charge against her.Those that supposedly witnessed it left without bringing the charge.

Are you saying that He could/would have had he been a witness to the crime?

9Marksfan
Jun 28th 2008, 01:32 PM
Regardless of whether he was a witness or not, he know that she was an adulteress and, as God, was the only one entitled to condemn her. So why didn't he? Because he was ignoring God's law? Absolutely not! But he was about to die for this woman's sin - and so, because of the certainty of that, on the BASIS of that atoning sacrifice, he forgives her - and commands her to sin no more. We often forget that. She WAS guilty and Jesus either HAD to condemn her if He were not to break the law (since He was God in the flesh) - or take the punishment she deserved in her place - and we all know that He did the latter when He went to the cross! :pp

mikebr
Jun 28th 2008, 01:42 PM
The forfeit of condemnation came before He told her to go and send no more. Are we to believe that she never sinned again? I think it would be dishonest to assume that she never sinned again. I do however believe that Jesus freed her from a life of adultery. It is only after we understand that we are completely forgiven for past and future sins that those sins lose their control over us. You are not condemned by God. Don't let sin control you life.

theBelovedDisciple
Jun 28th 2008, 01:49 PM
For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. John 3:17.

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost. Luke 19:10

The Son of God had a mission as stated in luke 19:10 and John 3:17 this was more important than condeming every sinner that came his way as his intention and greater purpose was to save them from their sin and reconcile them to God.
---------------------------------------------------------

Very well put.... you can also relate this to the time when James and John wanted to call down fire upon a town that did not recieve them.... He rebukes and states that His mission was to save men's lives not destroy them.. as with the harlot caught in adultery. The Pharisees were always trying to trap Jesus in His words and actions.. this was another attempt to do it.. He pretty much put them in their place by asking

he/she who is without sin cast the first stone... they all dropped their stones and walked away..

His Words and actions toward the condemned was one of Mercy and Grace.. and it was Goodness... It was His Glory.. for His Goodness is His Glory.

His Words made those who were ready to stone think and look inward... for if anyone there thought they were without sin they would of cast the stone.. but NONE did..

They were all expecting to see Jesus usher her away to be stoned because thats what the Law said had to be done....

But what is the HEART of the Law... Mercy, Judgement Good Faith...

This is what He demonstrated.

God commands us to look inward and examine ourselves... instead of going around and pointing the finger and accusing everything that someobody does wrong..

God's desire is not sacrafice but Mercy.... Jesus was demonstrating this by not letting her accusers stone her.. Then He tells her to go and sin no more.. Leave that lifestyle for good..

jayne
Jun 28th 2008, 02:45 PM
Just before the encounter with the adulterous woman, Jesus had really caused a stir in the temple. He had shaken people's belief systems to the core. The bible says that there was a division among the people and that the chief priests were looking to lay hands on Jesus.

The next day or so, Jesus was teaching in the temple again.

Those men who humiliatingly dragged her before Jesus weren't interested in the sanctity of marriage. They were scribes and Pharisees who interrupted his teachings to the people and demanded that Jesus publicly state what to do with her.

The bible says that they were using her to trap Jesus into saying something that they could use to brings charges against him.

They had no compassion for her. They didn't really care that the crime of adultery had been committed. They didn't really care that they only brought one of the two partners involved before Jesus.

This case had nothing to do punishing with the sin of adultery, but with seeking to destroy the credibility of Jesus Christ.

Jesus knew that. He knew that she was a pawn in their wicked game. He also knew that He had come to fulfill the Law. That is....to complete it. Yes, adultery is a sin. Yes, sin had to be paid for.

He was about to do that. And he delivered her from her sin of adulterous affair(s).

TRL1957
Jun 28th 2008, 05:22 PM
Jesus didn't condemn the women at the well, because he is merciful, unlike the law. His main concern was her soul, not the act that brought her there.

Scubadude
Jun 28th 2008, 05:31 PM
Regardless of whether he was a witness or not, he know that she was an adulteress and, as God, was the only one entitled to condemn her. So why didn't he? Because he was ignoring God's law? Absolutely not! But he was about to die for this woman's sin - and so, because of the certainty of that, on the BASIS of that atoning sacrifice, he forgives her - and commands her to sin no more. We often forget that. She WAS guilty and Jesus either HAD to condemn her if He were not to break the law (since He was God in the flesh) - or take the punishment she deserved in her place - and we all know that He did the latter when He went to the cross! :pp

Excellent post! :agree:

Frances
Jun 28th 2008, 05:38 PM
Why didn't Jesus condemn the woman caught in adultery when the law obviously did?

Presumably because Jesus knew she was being used by the Pharisees trying to trap Him, and that she probably had been deliberately led astray by the man the Pharisees had allowed to escape, with no interest in how the woman would suffer because of their ruthlessness.

Kahtar
Jun 28th 2008, 08:11 PM
Are you saying that He could/would have had he been a witness to the crime?

Uh, no..............

danield
Jun 28th 2008, 08:43 PM
I think Christ did condemn her by telling her to go and sin no more. We got to remember the reality of those men holding stones ready to kill her. She knew this and was extremely scared and repented in her heart of what she had done. It is like the mouse that was caught in a trap, she did not want the cheese she just wanted out of the trap. And Jesus freed her not only of her sin but of the condemnation of the men holding those stones. The condemnation is there but it is so overshadowed by the glory of Christ’s mercy. Christ did not over look the wages of sin because they are right in front of us in this story. Life filled with sin will lead to eternal death with out Christ. I feel certain this woman did not return to her adulteress affair.

Scubadude
Jun 28th 2008, 11:54 PM
Presumably because Jesus knew she was being used by the Pharisees trying to trap Him, and that she probably had been deliberately led astray by the man the Pharisees had allowed to escape, with no interest in how the woman would suffer because of their ruthlessness.

I appreciate everyone's thoughts.

God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble. May we all find ourselves in the adulteress' situation, so that we may receive grace.

mikebr
Jun 29th 2008, 01:41 AM
I think Christ did condemn her by telling her to go and sin no more. We got to remember the reality of those men holding stones ready to kill her. She knew this and was extremely scared and repented in her heart of what she had done. It is like the mouse that was caught in a trap, she did not want the cheese she just wanted out of the trap. And Jesus freed her not only of her sin but of the condemnation of the men holding those stones. The condemnation is there but it is so overshadowed by the glory of Christís mercy. Christ did not over look the wages of sin because they are right in front of us in this story. Life filled with sin will lead to eternal death with out Christ. I feel certain this woman did not return to her adulteress affair.


He said neither do I condemn you..................?:hmm:

davidandme
Jun 29th 2008, 03:02 AM
Why didn't Jesus condemn the woman caught in adultery when the law obviously did?

Because Jesus is bigger than the law of Moses and the theocracy laws of Israel. Jesus knew this woman's heart.

Saved7
Jun 29th 2008, 03:38 AM
Why didn't Jesus condemn the woman caught in adultery when the law obviously did?


Because nobody else was able to condemn her, cause they had all sinned. If just one human had not sinned, then Jesus wouldn't have had to pay for our sins. The lack of sin in just one person, apart from Christ Himself, would have been proof of our ability not to sin.

9Marksfan
Jun 29th 2008, 08:52 AM
Presumably because Jesus knew she was being used by the Pharisees trying to trap Him, and that she probably had been deliberately led astray by the man the Pharisees had allowed to escape, with no interest in how the woman would suffer because of their ruthlessness.

So are you saying he excused her sin?

9Marksfan
Jun 29th 2008, 09:14 AM
Because Jesus is bigger than the law of Moses and the theocracy laws of Israel.

But they came from God - and HE's God! Are the Father and Son in disagreement?!? The law is a reflection of God's holy character and Christ upheld the law to perfection -he also said he did not come to abolish the law but to fulfil it - not to ignore or overlook it.


Jesus knew this woman's heart.

For sure - but is that why He didn't condemn her? Is our sorrowing heart the BASIS for forgiveness? If so, Christ didn't need to go to the cross - a repentant heart would have sufficed. Think about it.....

Duane Morse
Jun 29th 2008, 09:17 AM
Personally, I think it was because Jesus was demonstrating the Grace of God - vs. the Wrath of God - for all those that would repent from their sins.

9Marksfan
Jun 29th 2008, 12:37 PM
Personally, I think it was because Jesus was demonstrating the Grace of God - vs. the Wrath of God - for all those that would repent from their sins.

Amen - but how was Christ able to deal with the wrath of God against her sin?

tango
Jun 29th 2008, 12:43 PM
For sure - but is that why He didn't condemn her? Is our sorrowing heart the BASIS for forgiveness? If so, Christ didn't need to go to the cross - a repentant heart would have sufficed. Think about it.....

Christ's sacrifice is what gives us the chance to receive forgiveness, but the sorrowing heart is needed to seek forgiveness.

9Marksfan
Jun 29th 2008, 01:08 PM
Christ's sacrifice is what gives us the chance to receive forgiveness, but the sorrowing heart is needed to seek forgiveness.

I'll agree with the second part - there can be no forgiveness without repentance - but ought we to see Christ's sacrifice as purely a "chance to receive forgiveness"? Paul says that believers were ACTUALLY RECONCILED by Christ's death (Rom 5:10, Col 2:21) - so was salvation ACCOMPLISHED on the cross or simply made POSSIBLE? Think carefully about your answer, bearing in mind Jesus's cry: "It is FINISHED!".

Brother Mark
Jun 29th 2008, 01:26 PM
I'll agree with the second part - there can be no forgiveness without repentance - but ought we to see Christ's sacrifice as purely a "chance to receive forgiveness"? Paul says that believers were ACTUALLY RECONCILED by Christ's death (Rom 5:10, Col 2:21) - so was salvation ACCOMPLISHED on the cross or simply made POSSIBLE? Think carefully about your answer, bearing in mind Jesus's cry: "It is FINISHED!".

Titus 2:11-14
11 For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all men, 12 instructing us to deny ungodliness and worldly desires and to live sensibly, righteously and godly in the present age, 13 looking for the blessed hope and the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Christ Jesus; 14 who gave Himself for us, that He might redeem us from every lawless deed and purify for Himself a people for His own possession, zealous for good deeds.
NASB

Though we see this scripture differently, I think God brought salvation to all men. Sadly, not all men receive it.

tango
Jun 29th 2008, 01:49 PM
I'll agree with the second part - there can be no forgiveness without repentance - but ought we to see Christ's sacrifice as purely a "chance to receive forgiveness"? Paul says that believers were ACTUALLY RECONCILED by Christ's death (Rom 5:10, Col 2:21) - so was salvation ACCOMPLISHED on the cross or simply made POSSIBLE? Think carefully about your answer, bearing in mind Jesus's cry: "It is FINISHED!".

Jesus' death opened the door to God to us - the curtain torn in two meant that the "ordinary people" could approach God instead of it being restricted to the High Priest.

Jesus' death gave us the right to approach God, but we still have to accept him in order to receive the gift (the emphasis below is mine)

Joh 1:10 He was in the world, and the world was made through Him, and the world did not know Him.
Joh 1:11 He came to His own, and His own did not receive Him.
Joh 1:12 But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, to those who believe in His name:


Joh 3:16 For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.


We may be arguing semantics rather than theology here, it seems to me that salvation is open to all but we still have to do something to receive it. In the context we are discussing, we have to repent to receive forgiveness.

1Jn 1:8 If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.
1Jn 1:9 If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.
1Jn 1:10 If we say that we have not sinned, we make Him a liar, and His word is not in us.

To repent is to acknowledge that we have sinned and to turn away from our sin. If we do not repent we are implying that we have not sinned. How can we receive forgiveness for our sins unless we take the step of acknowledging that we have sinned?

(Update: I fear this might sidetrack from the OP's question, it might be worth starting another thread to continue the discussion?)

davidandme
Jun 29th 2008, 04:21 PM
But they came from God - and HE's God! Are the Father and Son in disagreement?!? The law is a reflection of God's holy character and Christ upheld the law to perfection -he also said he did not come to abolish the law but to fulfil it - not to ignore or overlook it.



For sure - but is that why He didn't condemn her? Is our sorrowing heart the BASIS for forgiveness? If so, Christ didn't need to go to the cross - a repentant heart would have sufficed. Think about it.....
You bring interesting points. I might be wrong but I think Jesus was trying to teach the pharissees a lesson. I don't think that Jesus agree with their interpretation of the law of Moses. Everybody there was a sinner, yet they wanted to stone this poor women because she had sin. Notice how Jesus started writting everybodies sins on the sand. Why was He doing this? What Jesus was really saing is: If you all are sinners why are you stoning this women?

9Marksfan
Jun 30th 2008, 01:21 PM
You bring interesting points. I might be wrong but I think Jesus was trying to teach the pharissees a lesson. I don't think that Jesus agree with their interpretation of the law of Moses. Everybody there was a sinner, yet they wanted to stone this poor women because she had sin. Notice how Jesus started writting everybodies sins on the sand. Why was He doing this? What Jesus was really saing is: If you all are sinners why are you stoning this women?

These points are all good too - while we're not told what Jesus was writing in the sand, I think it's likely that it was their own sins.

Scubadude
Jun 30th 2008, 06:12 PM
You bring interesting points. I might be wrong but I think Jesus was trying to teach the pharissees a lesson. I don't think that Jesus agree with their interpretation of the law of Moses. Everybody there was a sinner, yet they wanted to stone this poor women because she had sin. Notice how Jesus started writting everybodies sins on the sand. Why was He doing this? What Jesus was really saing is: If you all are sinners why are you stoning this women?

I like where you are going with this. We are all sinners, no different than the adulterous woman. Haven't we been called an adulterous people? By using this woman (on many levels) to get at God, they made themselves twice the adulterous than the woman. Writing in the sand, I thing Jesus was listing the ways they had prostituted themselves.

Teke
Jun 30th 2008, 07:05 PM
I like where you are going with this. We are all sinners, no different than the adulterous woman. Haven't we been called an adulterous people? By using this woman (on many levels) to get at God, they made themselves twice the adulterous than the woman. Writing in the sand, I thing Jesus was listing the ways they had prostituted themselves.

Good point. There is more than one way of looking at "adultery". :)

Scubadude
Jun 30th 2008, 08:52 PM
To repent is to acknowledge that we have sinned and to turn away from our sin. If we do not repent we are implying that we have not sinned. How can we receive forgiveness for our sins unless we take the step of acknowledging that we have sinned?

(Update: I fear this might sidetrack from the OP's question, it might be worth starting another thread to continue the discussion?)

Do you think the men in this story were acknowledging their sin by leaving, the oldest first to recognize the truth in Jesus' question? The story doesn't say so, but by their actions, I think there may have been some 'confession' to their guilt by leaving.

tango
Jun 30th 2008, 09:01 PM
I would imagine so. If Jesus said "let him who is without sin..." and one by one they all left I figure they all accepted that they weren't so righteous after all.

keck553
Jun 30th 2008, 09:26 PM
All true about the witnesses, etc. Another example of Jesus putting God's law above the traditions of men...but there's more!!

I just LOVE this story. I just want to share a study I did regarding Jesus writing in the dust with His finger. It fulfills prophecy.

First, a little background on the culture. When children were taught, a layer of sand was spread on a board and the lesson written in the sand. When the lesson was over, the sand was wiped off the board (note key word: wiped off)

Jer 17:13 Hope of Isra'el, Adonai! All who abandon you will be ashamed, those who leave you will be inscribed in the dust, because they have abandoned Adonai, the source of living water.

If so, I wouldn't want to be the one Jesus was writing in the dust.....

Scubadude
Jul 1st 2008, 09:21 AM
I would imagine so. If Jesus said "let him who is without sin..." and one by one they all left I figure they all accepted that they weren't so righteous after all.

I haven't thought about this before. Usually, my response towards the men in this story is one of indignation. They conspired to trap Jesus in the most ugly way by degrading this woman (and themselves). But after reading through this thread, I'm starting to think there may have been some hope for these guys after all. In fact, I think Jesus turned an ugly situation into something beautiful by exposing everyones need for a savior and repentance. The woman and the men.

Thaddaeus
Jul 1st 2008, 09:39 AM
Why didn't Jesus condemn the woman caught in adultery when the law obviously did?

:hmm:
A greater question than this would be why didn't Jesus condemn me, but for you to find the true answer to your question mikebr is to find the answer to this question: why didn't Jesus condemn mikebr For we also know that the law says

Ro 3:23 For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;

Ro 6:23 For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.

9Marksfan
Jul 1st 2008, 10:05 AM
I would imagine so. If Jesus said "let him who is without sin..." and one by one they all left I figure they all accepted that they weren't so righteous after all.

But note that NONE of them went to Christ for forgiveness - this is something I've never noticed before - although the woman was clearly penitent for her sin, she didn't turn away from Christ and leave like the others - she was drawn by His grace to stay and listen! Had never noticed this until now.

The scribes and Pharisees were convicted - but remained in their sins - they turned away from Jesus, even though they knew they were guilty - I've seen this happen so often - people being convicted without being converted.......

But this woman stayed and stood before Him - like she believed He had the right to condemn her (which He did) - yet she was forgiven by Jesus and commanded to sin no more - there's SO MUCH in this wonderful passage!

Brother Mark
Jul 1st 2008, 01:24 PM
But note that NONE of them went to Christ for forgiveness - this is something I've never noticed before - although the woman was clearly penitent for her sin, she didn't turn away from Christ and leave like the others - she was drawn by His grace to stay and listen! Had never noticed this until now.

The scribes and Pharisees were convicted - but remained in their sins - they turned away from Jesus, even though they knew they were guilty - I've seen this happen so often - people being convicted without being converted.......

But this woman stayed and stood before Him - like she believed He had the right to condemn her (which He did) - yet she was forgiven by Jesus and commanded to sin no more - there's SO MUCH in this wonderful passage!

The law, used properly, should lead us to Christ. Though the way the Pharisees used it and the way others use it, it often leads to death and condemnation. Many teach that Judas didn't repent. But he did. He repented of what he had done. He just did not repent unto Christ. He repented from his sin but not to his Lord. And therein lies the rub for many folks. Even the heathen will sometimes repent of their sin because of what it is costing them. But sadly, they will not repent unto their Lord. As you have pointed out, we see that in this passage with the Pharisees.

Jesusinmyheart
Jul 9th 2008, 07:44 PM
To answer your question:

Why didn't Jesus condemn the woman caught in adultery when the law obviously did?
THe Law didn't actually condemn her at this point, because the Law also prescribed a certain way to go about making the right judgment concerning these things. If the prescribed course of finding fault with someone could not be followed then the whole case fell apart.

Deu 19:18 And the judges shall make diligent inquisition: and, behold, if the witness be a false witness, and hath testified falsely against his brother;

Were the Pharisees without sin? Were they witnesses with integrity? This sort of scheme is still used today in the court to cast doubt upon the credibility of any witness against the accused.

Deu 17:6 On the evidence of two witnesses or of three witnesses the one who is to die shall be put to death; a person shall not be put to death on the evidence of one witness.

Were all the Pharisees witnesses to this crime? Even if, were they credible?

Lev 20:10 And the man that committeth adultery with another man's wife, even he that committeth adultery with his neighbour's wife, the adulterer and the adulteress shall surely be put to death.

And the last issue is, where was the man whom this woman comitted adultery with?
Surely, if they were witnesses to the crime, they would have brought him too?

Now Yeshua also said:

Joh 12:47 If anyone hears my words and does not keep them, I do not judge him; for I did not come to judge the world but to save the world.
Joh 12:48 The one who rejects me and does not receive my words has a judge; the word that I have spoken will judge him on the last day.

So here are the factors that weighed in on that day.

Now the Pharisees came to test him, and through the Law Yeshua stood that test, because He knew exactly how to apply it.
There was nothing miraculous about this whole thing, Yeshua used the existing Law to set her free. The requirements for punishment were not met and satisfied.

Yeshua knowing her heart though sternly warned her to go and sin no more.

Yeshua said neither do i condemn you, is because He knows as long any of us are still alive there's hope of our return and repentance. God would rather see us turn and repent instead of die at which point no one can do any more work.

Shalom,
Tanja