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manichunter
Aug 18th 2008, 03:24 AM
What is a Protestant Christian?

Do all Protestant Christians believe the same things?


If not, how do they believe differently?

markedward
Aug 18th 2008, 03:27 AM
A Protestant Christian is a person who follows the set of teachings from a denomination that rose out of the Protestant Reformation. And since there are multiple denominations within Protestantism, then of course, not all Protestants believe the same things.

As for what they believe differently, that requires an in-depth look into what the different denominations believe, then contrasting them.

Revinius
Aug 18th 2008, 04:10 AM
In addition to what markedward mentioned: The protestant reformation, sparked by men like Martin Luther was a movement designed to reform the 'universal' church of the time. It resulted in a split with the Roman Catholics going their seperate way and the reforming Protestants having their own seperate churches. This lead to alot of state wars between 'catholic' and 'protestant' states. The denomenations you see today are mainly a result of choice of worships styles that focus on certain biblical points. As far as salvation goes though, as long as they keep is biblical and let the Word be the teacher and judge, it's harder to go wrong.

Toymom
Aug 18th 2008, 03:51 PM
The term Protestant is also used by the RCC and Orthodox to describe all Christians who do not belong to their two religions.
However, not all Non RCC and Non Orthodox are Protestants.
There have been just plain old Christians and groups of Christians who follow Christ and only biblical teachings since the time of Christ.

David Taylor
Aug 18th 2008, 04:46 PM
Protestant also at times, is used to denote groups who simply disagree with RCC teachings; and may not have been systematized groups who actually sprang out of the Protestant reformation.

Modern non-denominational blended congregations, for example.
or ancient lineages outside of the RCC like the anabaptists, waldeneses, Oriental orthodox, etc.

Frances
Aug 18th 2008, 04:58 PM
I've always understood that every Christian is either a Roman Catholic, or a Protestant - a Christian who protests at the unBiblical aspects of Roman Catholic beliefs and practices . . . eg. that the communion bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Jesus Christ, that Mary was sinless, that she had/has anything to do with our Salvation, that there are a group known as 'Saints' who can answer prayers, that a priest can forgive Sins, that there is such a place as 'purgatory', that paying a sum of money on someone's behalf reduces the amount of time they spend in purgatory etc. etc. etc.

David Taylor
Aug 18th 2008, 05:09 PM
I've always understood that every Christian is either a Roman Catholic, or a Protestant - a Christian who protests at the unBiblical aspects of Roman Catholic beliefs and practices . . . eg. that the communion bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Jesus Christ, that Mary was sinless, that she had/has anything to do with our Salvation, that there are a group known as 'Saints' who can answer prayers, that a priest can forgive Sins, that there is such a place as 'purgatory', that paying a sum of money on someone's behalf reduces the amount of time they spend in purgatory etc. etc. etc.

I think you've nailed the 'Common' and 'Typical' definition that most folks think of when they think of Protestants.

It is a 'protest' against certain practices of the RCC. (regardless of when and by whom).

KATA_LOUKAN
Aug 18th 2008, 09:58 PM
What is a Protestant Christian?

A follower of the Christian reformation movement in the Western Church. It could also mean (as David Taylor already noted) any group that "protests" the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church.

In addition to this, there are Eastern Orthodox Christians, who separated from Rome in the 11th century and the Oriental Orthodox Christians among others that disagreed with the teachings that came out of the ecumenical councils.


Do all Protestant Christians believe the same things?

Among Protestants, you will find a broad range of beliefs that span the spectrum from very conservative to very liberal, and everywhere in between.


If not, how do they believe differently?

Did you mean, "if yes"?

Well, the differences are much to large to show here. Conservative estimates believe that there are thousands of denominations, all of which are different in matters of doctrine, although there are several points nearly all agree on (the five solas).

1. Sola scriptura (Only the Bible is the source of divine revelation)
2. Sola fide (You are saved by faith alone)
3. Solo Iesu (Only Jesus is the savior)
4. Sola gratia (Saved by grace)
5. Soli Geo gloria (Glory to God only)

Toymom
Aug 19th 2008, 04:14 AM
1. Sola scriptura (Only the Bible is the source of divine revelation)
2. Sola fide (You are saved by faith alone)
3. Solo Iesu (Only Jesus is the savior)
4. Sola gratia (Saved by grace)
5. Soli Geo gloria (Glory to God only)
there are also solo cups http://www.solocup.com/images/aboutSoloSidebarDetails.jpg
which we use often in home meetings of our church :lol:

Teke
Sep 12th 2008, 08:21 PM
The term Protestant is also used by the RCC and Orthodox to describe all Christians who do not belong to their two religions.

The term isn't used by Orthodox Christians, and you don't have to belong to an Orthodox religion. The Orthodox use the adjective "heterodox", meaning different from established or accepted doctrines or beliefs. ref.Collins Estential English Dictionary



There have been just plain old Christians and groups of Christians who follow Christ and only biblical teachings since the time of Christ.

All Christian groups can claim as much.

Jerome1
Sep 12th 2008, 11:32 PM
Hey Teke havn't seen you in a while, thought you had disapeared.



The term isn't used by Orthodox Christians, and you don't have to belong to an Orthodox religion. The Orthodox use the adjective "heterodox", meaning different from established or accepted doctrines or beliefs. ref.Collins Estential English Dictionary


Isn't heterdox a polite term for heretical?

Most protestants i am aware of hold to the five solas, and the spiritual communion of, "born again," believers.

Teke
Sep 13th 2008, 06:31 PM
Jerome, heterodox means different in the sense that it's not the status quo so to speak, or traditional. It doesn't mean heretic or heresy.

Jerome1
Sep 14th 2008, 12:59 AM
Jerome, heterodox means different in the sense that it's not the status quo so to speak, or traditional. It doesn't mean heretic or heresy.

I checked it on the dictionary.



2. Holding heterodox opinions, or doctrines not orthodox; heretical; -- said of persons. --Macaulay. -- Het"er*o*dox`ly (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Heter*o*dox%60ly), adv. -- Het"er*o*dox`ness (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Heter*o*dox%60ness), n.

Teke
Sep 14th 2008, 10:07 PM
I checked it on the dictionary.

Must be a biased definition. "Hetero" means "different" and "dox" is from the Greek word "doxa" meaning "opinion".

I think heretic is more a RC associated meaning and has to do with choosing. As in choosing not to believe RC dogma. I could be wrong.

Orthodox Christians "anathema" certain things after careful consideration. :D

Jerome1
Sep 14th 2008, 10:14 PM
Must be a biased definition. "Hetero" means "different" and "dox" is from the Greek word "doxa" meaning "opinion".

I think heretic is more a RC associated meaning and has to do with choosing. As in choosing not to believe RC dogma. I could be wrong.

Orthodox Christians "anathema" certain things after careful consideration. :D

Technically though, from an Orthodox perspective as well, aren't people considered heretical who don't hold to Orthodox teachings?

I think iv'e heard the Orthodox Church in Russia describe protestant denominations in Russia as heretical.

DadBurnett
Sep 15th 2008, 06:02 AM
Labels, most of all, are problematic, made up of all kinds of perception and bias. They are the stuff of judgment ... they are made up words, made up by human beings to tear apart the fabric of humanity. What righteous profit is their in labels? They are the stuff of often conflicting and confusing details and as the Bard one said ... the devil is in the details ...

Teke
Sep 15th 2008, 06:43 PM
Technically though, from an Orthodox perspective as well, aren't people considered heretical who don't hold to Orthodox teachings?

I think iv'e heard the Orthodox Church in Russia describe protestant denominations in Russia as heretical.

I've never heard that before. But I have heard Russian priests and bishops ask why their Orthodox Christians would be following another gospel preaching when it's already been presented to them long ago.

A decision of heresy has to have proof. Such as denying established dogma. Things like the Incarnation, virgin birth, Trinity, Transfiguration, Resurrection etc. IOW all the things the ancient church already established in relation to explaining Christ to the world.

If those things are excepted but the sect is outside of the council of the church, then they are considered schismatic. Orthodox consider Roman catholics to be schismatic but not heretics. As RC's accept the dogma's of the early councils yet they are outside of the council of the whole church, in that they have become their own council.

Anyway, the word "protestant" means to protest. If this is what they do with the church, then they are protestants.
As for me, irregardless of difference of opinion, I will never protest the church.

Jerome1
Sep 15th 2008, 09:15 PM
I've never heard that before. But I have heard Russian priests and bishops ask why their Orthodox Christians would be following another gospel preaching when it's already been presented to them long ago.


I seen a news article on it before. It was about religious freedom in Russia.

Teke
Sep 16th 2008, 01:21 AM
I seen a news article on it before. It was about religious freedom in Russia.

While religious freedom is a good thing, it becomes a question of whether Christians should proselytize other Christians, which is something I disagree with. Since it touches on breaking the commandement to honor our parents, as well as coveting what is your neighbors.

I suppose this is what Protestant Evangelicals need to rethink when entering a country that has already been evangelized.

The Russian Orthodox in this case, likely do not believe that Protestants should proselytize Orthodox, when Orthodox do not proselytize Protestants.

David Taylor
Sep 16th 2008, 05:30 PM
While religious freedom is a good thing, it becomes a question of whether Christians should proselytize other Christians, which is something I disagree with.

This isn't to knock any denomination or group; so please don't read it that way.

I would think that evanglical Christians only focus on those within other groups who the identify from firsthand conversation, as wearing a 'I am a Christian' pin on their shirts, in other words claiming to be Christian, yet when they are talked to about their relationship with Christ, how they are saved, what He has done for them, etc...they answer as a non-Christian would do; as if they have the Christian T-Shirt, but don't have the substance of faith that a true believer and follower of Christ would have.

Calling oneself a Christian doesn't a Christian make, and folks who are pretending or misguided into thinking they are a Christian because of their parents, or their church, or their heritage desperately need to hear about Jesus and His saving grace.

That to my understanding, is why evangelicals proselythize within other Christian groups, because some Christian groups wear the label but don't have the true personal relationship with Christ that a true Christian would have.

Teke
Sep 16th 2008, 07:52 PM
This isn't to knock any denomination or group; so please don't read it that way.

I would think that evanglical Christians only focus on those within other groups who the identify from firsthand conversation, as wearing a 'I am a Christian' pin on their shirts, in other words claiming to be Christian, yet when they are talked to about their relationship with Christ, how they are saved, what He has done for them, etc...they answer as a non-Christian would do; as if they have the Christian T-Shirt, but don't have the substance of faith that a true believer and follower of Christ would have.

That is like saying they don't give the answer you want to hear.


Calling oneself a Christian doesn't a Christian make, and folks who are pretending or misguided into thinking they are a Christian because of their parents, or their church, or their heritage desperately need to hear about Jesus and His saving grace.

That is like saying that God isn't leading those people and only an evangelical can do His work. After all it is God who gave them their heritage, parents and church.


That to my understanding, is why evangelicals proselythize within other Christian groups, because some Christian groups wear the label but don't have the true personal relationship with Christ that a true Christian would have.

Sounds like a comparison based on your opinion. Usually such opinons are uneducated guesses and generalizations.

I am naive enough to believe that God knows exactly what He is doing with people. And, only He can reveal the Son to someone.

I do understand what you propose having walked in that way in past time. But God eventually led me to repent of such "confusion of face".

God warned Israel not to be led astray by foreign wives or they would face quick destruction. Mixed marriages had not always been prohibited (ie. Boaz and Ruth), but later were seen as detrimental to purity. (see 2 Cor. 6:14)

In the simplest terms, if I don't "believe" what you believe, then I am an "unbeliever" in your understanding of a Christian.

Christianity can become as Psalm 44 says.....

Psa 44:12 Thou sellest thy people for nought, and dost not increase [thy wealth] by their price.

Psa 44:13 Thou makest us a reproach to our neighbours, a scorn and a derision to them that are round about us.

Psa 44:14 Thou makest us a byword among the heathen, a shaking of the head among the people.

Psa 44:15 My confusion [is] continually before me, and the shame of my face hath covered me,

Psa 44:16 For the voice of him that reproacheth and blasphemeth; by reason of the enemy and avenger.

David Taylor
Sep 16th 2008, 09:01 PM
You make more out of what I was saying, that I was saying.

In summary, evangelicals evangelize. They do so by getting to know someone, and asking them questions.

If I went up to a guy walking out of a Russian Orthodox Church, and asked him if we could sit and talk, and started talking to him about the Bible, about Jesus, and about the Christian life we have; and he said he really didn't know anything about Jesus, hadn't ever read much of the bible, and just went to that church because his parents did, but that he was raised a Christian....

that doesn't make the dude a Christian. If he doesn't know anything about Jesus, what Jesus did, why Jesus did it, and that he needs a saviour for his unrepentant sins; then he can call himself a Christian all he wants to do; regardless of the situation; and he isn't one.

Evangelicals reach out to people that don't know Jesus, to share Jesus with them....because they have a strong internal desire to share the true gospel that alone can save; with all who may not know it.

Nothing generalized nor uneducated. Just sincere, foundational Christian love for someone who may not know Jesus; and not even realize it.


In the simplest terms, if I don't "believe" what you believe, then I am an "unbeliever" in your understanding of a Christian.
No, the simplest terms are, if you don't believe in Jesus, don't know anything about Him and what He did for you, and that He is the saviour of your soul, that you must repent of your sins and follow Him and make Him your Lord...then you are an unbeliever.

That is the understanding of a Christian.

KATA_LOUKAN
Sep 16th 2008, 09:22 PM
I suppose this is what Protestant Evangelicals need to rethink when entering a country that has already been evangelized.

Why don't you Orthodox Christians stay out of our evangelized Churches in America? I think there is a double standard here! :D

You took Franky Schaeffer, Peter Gilquist, the Antiochian priest in Chicago (don't remeber his name) and the Antiochian church itself is growing at a rate of 300% a year.

40% of your clergy are former Protestants in the United States.

Why not focus your time and energy on evangelizing the Muslims in your homeland?

PS - no disrespect, I'm happy that the Orthodox church is so dedicated to serving Christ in eastern Europe, but I think you should take the plank out of your own eye, so to speak! :D

Br. Barnabas
Sep 17th 2008, 12:47 PM
Why don't you Orthodox Christians stay out of our evangelized Churches in America? I think there is a double standard here! :D

You took Franky Schaeffer, Peter Gilquist, the Antiochian priest in Chicago (don't remeber his name) and the Antiochian church itself is growing at a rate of 300% a year.

40% of your clergy are former Protestants in the United States.


I have several friends who went from being protestants to being Orthodox all on there own, not because the Orthodox sought them out.

I think it shows that in some protestant churches there is something missing, all my friends that have joined the Orthodox, RCC, or Anglican churches did so of their own accord. Because we were not being filled in the Evangelical protestant churches we were at. I think the same may go with the folks you mentioned above.

The late Robert Webber, wrote a few books on this very subject. That many people are finding that their churches leave them wanting, so they find ones that do not. And more and more are finding them in more traditional churches.

We all experience God in different ways. Some enjoy the more evangelical churches, others enjoy charismatic churches, and other enjoy the 'higher' churches/more traditional churches.

I don't think it was the Orthodox stealing these protestants because in my experience it was that the protestants got sick of feeling like there was something missing or that they did not fit in and left for a place were they could better experience God.

Teke
Sep 17th 2008, 02:46 PM
You make more out of what I was saying, that I was saying.

I just wanted you to think more about what you were saying.:)
You also ignored the commandments I pointed out. If you are of the sort that believes the commandments are not relevant to evangelism then we are in difference of opinion.
My children are to obey me before any evangelist.


In summary, evangelicals evangelize. They do so by getting to know someone, and asking them questions.

I can't relate to that because it wasn't my experience. I wasn't raised in any denomination, but if I had been I'd likely be in that denom. God just revealed His Son to me one day. It was only then that I sought Him in His church.
If I was "evangelized" it was by God Himself.


If I went up to a guy walking out of a Russian Orthodox Church, and asked him if we could sit and talk, and started talking to him about the Bible, about Jesus, and about the Christian life we have; and he said he really didn't know anything about Jesus, hadn't ever read much of the bible, and just went to that church because his parents did, but that he was raised a Christian....

that doesn't make the dude a Christian. If he doesn't know anything about Jesus, what Jesus did, why Jesus did it, and that he needs a saviour for his unrepentant sins; then he can call himself a Christian all he wants to do; regardless of the situation; and he isn't one.

If you had experienced Orthodoxy, you'd know that could not be possible. Everything is very literally Christ related. Scripture is also literally experienced and followed. Orthodoxy means right worsip, not evangelism.


Evangelicals reach out to people that don't know Jesus, to share Jesus with them....because they have a strong internal desire to share the true gospel that alone can save; with all who may not know it.

As I said, I understand this passion. It is just that many of us are not evangelists. We just want to worship God.
We invite people to come and worship God. We know they already have some sort of relationship with God, we're just not the judge of that relationship. Our main concern is their soul. Therefore baptism is most important to put them into the body of Christ. "As many as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ", that's all we can say about the souls of people. :)

David Taylor
Sep 17th 2008, 03:11 PM
So what you are telling me, is that there are no members with an Orthodox church, would would call themselves a Christian; but not really be one?

All Orthodox members are truly born again, truly have confessed Jesus, understand He is their redeemer, and have repented their sins of Him and become one of His children?

Teke
Sep 17th 2008, 03:16 PM
Why don't you Orthodox Christians stay out of our evangelized Churches in America? I think there is a double standard here! :D

You took Franky Schaeffer, Peter Gilquist, the Antiochian priest in Chicago (don't remeber his name) and the Antiochian church itself is growing at a rate of 300% a year.

40% of your clergy are former Protestants in the United States.

Why not focus your time and energy on evangelizing the Muslims in your homeland?

PS - no disrespect, I'm happy that the Orthodox church is so dedicated to serving Christ in eastern Europe, but I think you should take the plank out of your own eye, so to speak! :D

God took the plank out of my eye after He evangelized me by revealing the Son (Read my previous post).

No disrespect to you either. But the Orthodox were the first to evangelize North America. Read church history. St Peter the Aleut was the first martyr in North America. He was killed by Roman catholics who tried to convert him.
Orthodox are also known for translating the scriptures for native lands, so they could have and read the bible.

As to the Muslims. History proves we get along with difficult neighbors. Should God decide to transform them, we are there for them. Orthodox perform exorcisms on many Muslims in the east. I've posted links before from Youtube with examples of this practice.

We do not "take" people from anything. God leads people as they are able to recieve Him. If He should lead them into our churches missions that is His good pleasure to do so.

Teke
Sep 17th 2008, 03:29 PM
So what you are telling me, is that there are no members with an Orthodox church, would would call themselves a Christian; but not really be one?

All Orthodox members are truly born again, truly have confessed Jesus, understand He is their redeemer, and have repented their sins of Him and become one of His children?

If they are in the Orthodox church, there is nothing else they do but live this truth being transformed by grace.

BTW, we do not only teach Christ. The Trinity is the balance and dogma of our faith. All truth flows from the Trinity.

Teke
Sep 17th 2008, 03:38 PM
I have several friends who went from being protestants to being Orthodox all on there own, not because the Orthodox sought them out.

Indeed. My priest is from an American Episcopalian denom that became to liberal for him (ie. women in the priesthood). He sought the ancient way as many of us do.