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poochie
Aug 22nd 2008, 08:55 PM
1 Tim 5:10 English Standard Version

and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work.

---

The context is in reference to widows, however some New-Evangelical groups use this to aid their support of ceremonial foot washing. I was in a circle once in a denomination, and there opposite sexes washed each others feet. I have not looked at the Greek, or done a hermeneutical analysis of the passage, but one has to wonder if this passage is to be interpreted litterally.

I am a Conservative Evangelical and I usually interpret the Bible literally.

Has any of you been in a church that practiced foot washing? Or what do you think the passage means? Did the women in that culture literally wash the feet of the saints? Understanding Jewish culture in the ANE perhaps this was a practice. Jesus had his feet literally wiped by a woman.


Thanks..

Sold Out
Aug 22nd 2008, 09:26 PM
The only time I had it done was at a ladies luncheon where the hostess had an area for you to sit and listen to a tape of scripture she recorded (of her reading about Jesus washing the disciples feet) while she washed your feet. I thought it was wonderful.

Other than that, I've never seen or experienced it.

valleybldr
Aug 22nd 2008, 09:55 PM
1 Tim 5:10 English Standard Version

and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work.

---

The context is in reference to widows, however some New-Evangelical groups use this to aid their support of ceremonial foot washing. I was in a circle once in a denomination, and there opposite sexes washed each others feet. I have not looked at the Greek, or done a hermeneutical analysis of the passage, but one has to wonder if this passage is to be interpreted litterally.

I am a Conservative Evangelical and I usually interpret the Bible literally.

Has any of you been in a church that practiced foot washing? Or what do you think the passage means? Did the women in that culture literally wash the feet of the saints? Understanding Jewish culture in the ANE perhaps this was a practice. Jesus had his feet literally wiped by a woman.


Thanks.."Ceremonial foot washing" at the Lord's Supper/Passover once a year is a bit different then regularly serving others as per the context of 1 Tim 5:10. todd

poochie
Aug 23rd 2008, 02:44 AM
Its definitely rare. But I experienced it that one time.


The only time I had it done was at a ladies luncheon where the hostess had an area for you to sit and listen to a tape of scripture she recorded (of her reading about Jesus washing the disciples feet) while she washed your feet. I thought it was wonderful.

Other than that, I've never seen or experienced it.

amazzin
Aug 23rd 2008, 03:03 AM
1 Tim 5:10 English Standard Version

and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work.

---

The context is in reference to widows, however some New-Evangelical groups use this to aid their support of ceremonial foot washing. I was in a circle once in a denomination, and there opposite sexes washed each others feet. I have not looked at the Greek, or done a hermeneutical analysis of the passage, but one has to wonder if this passage is to be interpreted litterally.

I am a Conservative Evangelical and I usually interpret the Bible literally.

Has any of you been in a church that practiced foot washing? Or what do you think the passage means? Did the women in that culture literally wash the feet of the saints? Understanding Jewish culture in the ANE perhaps this was a practice. Jesus had his feet literally wiped by a woman.


Thanks..

There is an organization that does this as a ceremonial event for reconciliation.

However, foot washing was an expression of hospitality being extended to guests in Bible times, People traveling dusty roads in Palestine needed to wash their feet for comfort and cleanliness, and foot washing was generally performed by the lowliest servant in teh household like in Luke 7:44. Foot washing became a sign Jesus used to teach humility as He washed His disciples feet. He explained this act as an example of teh spirit they must always be ready to show one another..

What you quoted above in Tim 5 suggest that the early church followed the ritual of foot washing, and some also to the same today- either ritually or in sporadic occasion, practice foot washing as a ministry of humility.

The Parson
Aug 23rd 2008, 03:11 AM
It was practiced in the older Baptist churches and is practiced at River of Life but not necessarily ceremonially. The practice is used when two or more brethren who have had a dispute and have reconciled, perform it usually with no more than a days notice. Mind you, it is never treated as an ordainance, but rather a outward display of humbleness towards the involved brethren. Or even the sisters also who would have their own seperate washing. Last one was 3 months ago.

poochie
Aug 23rd 2008, 03:13 AM
Its a great idea. Some of the New-Evangelical groups practice it. Even women washing mens feet. Traditionalists would say thats inappropriate, but perhaps it may not be.

When we get to Heaven God will point out th right and wrongs of all teh groups (Charismatics, Evangelicals, New Evangelicals, Fundamentalists).



There is an organization that does this as a ceremonial event for reconciliation.

However, foot washing was an expression of hospitality being extended to guests in Bible times, People traveling dusty roads in Palestine needed to wash their feet for comfort and cleanliness, and foot washing was generally performed by the lowliest servant in teh household like in Luke 7:44. Foot washing became a sign Jesus used to teach humility as He washed His disciples feet. He explained this act as an example of teh spirit they must always be ready to show one another..

What you quoted above in Tim 5 suggest that the early church followed the ritual of foot washing, and some also to the same today- either ritually or in sporadic occasion, practice foot washing as a ministry of humility.

seamus414
Aug 23rd 2008, 04:33 AM
1 Tim 5:10 English Standard Version

and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work.

---

The context is in reference to widows, however some New-Evangelical groups use this to aid their support of ceremonial foot washing. I was in a circle once in a denomination, and there opposite sexes washed each others feet. I have not looked at the Greek, or done a hermeneutical analysis of the passage, but one has to wonder if this passage is to be interpreted litterally.

I am a Conservative Evangelical and I usually interpret the Bible literally.

Has any of you been in a church that practiced foot washing? Or what do you think the passage means? Did the women in that culture literally wash the feet of the saints? Understanding Jewish culture in the ANE perhaps this was a practice. Jesus had his feet literally wiped by a woman.


Thanks..

Traditionally, Christians practice footwashing at the Celebration of Maundy Thursday (a.k.a Holy Thursday), the Thursday that immediately preceeds Easter and Good Friday.

I have seen it where the clergy wash the feet of various folks in the congregation, or people wash each other's feet.

This, of course, commemorates the footwashing Jesus commanded at the Last Supper (which is the event Maundy Thursday commemorates).

Literalist-Luke
Aug 23rd 2008, 04:34 AM
Considering that in those days they didn't have socks, tennis shoes, and cars to get around in, it would be an obsolete practice today. The significance of the practice is not in the act itself, but rather the general attitude of serving, whatever the need may be. Of course, if performing the act helps one to identify more closely with Jesus, there's certainly nothing wrong with doing it, so long as one recognizes that it's not going to "score any points" with God.

Ethnikos
Aug 23rd 2008, 07:01 AM
We do it at my church once every quarter, which is three months. We do it before communion. It is done in a room other than the sanctuary. The women go in one room and the men go in another.
Every one who is going to participate get together and pair up with another person. We say a prayer and then one person washes the other person's feet and then switch places and the person who got his feet washed the first time washes the other person's feet.
If that is understandable. I guess most churches do not do that. It seems pretty normal to me, but I have always been around that.

dan
Aug 23rd 2008, 08:40 AM
...The Catholics perform The Washing Of Feet Of The Saints ceremonially on Holy Thursday.

Literalist-Luke
Aug 23rd 2008, 09:02 AM
...The Catholics perform The Washing Of Feet Of The Saints ceremonially on Holy Thursday.http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/twitch.gif Dead "saints"?

poochie
Aug 23rd 2008, 09:57 AM
Some have women and men wash each others feet.


We do it at my church once every quarter, which is three months. We do it before communion. It is done in a room other than the sanctuary. The women go in one room and the men go in another.
Every one who is going to participate get together and pair up with another person. We say a prayer and then one person washes the other person's feet and then switch places and the person who got his feet washed the first time washes the other person's feet.
If that is understandable. I guess most churches do not do that. It seems pretty normal to me, but I have always been around that.

dan
Aug 23rd 2008, 10:05 AM
http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/twitch.gif Dead "saints"?

The Bishop, if I recall correctly, washes the feet of twelve priests.
Saints include all that go to, or are expected to go to, heaven. Even you and I.

Whispering Grace
Aug 23rd 2008, 12:45 PM
We do it at my church once every quarter, which is three months. We do it before communion. It is done in a room other than the sanctuary. The women go in one room and the men go in another.

Yes, we practice foot washing in my church, and it is done just as is quoted above.

Ethnikos
Aug 23rd 2008, 01:00 PM
Some have women and men wash each others feet.
We would not go for that, meaning a Conservative church that does not believe in dancing or rock music.
Like I said, women would never be in the same room as men.
This has to do with modesty.
Jesus was with all men when he washed their feet, at the last supper.
This is not just an individual church but a major denomination.

cheech
Aug 23rd 2008, 01:16 PM
I first experienced this last year when we began attending the church we are currently in. It was symbolic to Christ washing the feet of his disciples. It was a very humbling experience. From what I can recall...the women washed the womens feet and the men washed the mens feet. I think it just ended up that way. They do this every year.

seamus414
Aug 23rd 2008, 06:48 PM
http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/twitch.gif Dead "saints"?

No no no, don't get all on guard. I have never heard the day called that but it has nothing to do with dead saints and has ONLY to do with remembering the footwashing Jesus did on that night. By the way the word saints above needs no quotations. Also, more than just RCs celebrate this holiday: EOs, Anglicans, Methodists, and Lutherans and maybe others do as well.

seamus414
Aug 23rd 2008, 06:50 PM
The Bishop, if I recall correctly, washes the feet of twelve priests.
Saints include all that go to, or are expected to go to, heaven. Even you and I.

It depends as there are not that many bishops to go around. Usually the bishop washes thw feet of 12 priests at the cathedral and the priest of each parish washes the feet of his parishoners.

Literalist-Luke
Aug 23rd 2008, 07:12 PM
No no no, don't get all on guard. I have never heard the day called that but it has nothing to do with dead saints and has ONLY to do with remembering the footwashing Jesus did on that night. By the way the word saints above needs no quotations. Also, more than just RCs celebrate this holiday: EOs, Anglicans, Methodists, and Lutherans and maybe others do as well.OK, I understand. The reason I got all worked about it is because, normally (assuming that my understanding is correct here) when Catholics speak of "saints", they're speaking of great believers of the past who have been "canonized", like "St. Paul" or "St. Teresa" or "St. John" and so forth and so on.

My understanding of the Bible's use of the word "saints" is that you and I are both just as much "saints" as Paul or John or any of the apostles. We won't have the same position of authority in the Kingdom as them, but we're still saints, just as a Private in the army is just as much a soldier as a five-star general.

poochie
Aug 23rd 2008, 07:38 PM
What denomination?


We would not go for that, meaning a Conservative church that does not believe in dancing or rock music.
Like I said, women would never be in the same room as men.
This has to do with modesty.
Jesus was with all men when he washed their feet, at the last supper.
This is not just an individual church but a major denomination.

Ethnikos
Aug 23rd 2008, 08:22 PM
What denomination?
Seventh Day Adventist. I am not sure how that got started other than to be part of communion service.
The foot washing is done first thing after the congregation gathers for the church service. Shortly after the normal business that goes on at the beginning of church service, we are dismissed to go to the areas for foot washing. Once people are done, they make their way back to the sanctuary. When everyone is back, the main communion part starts.
The whole thing is pretty simple compared to some churches. We read some scripture together that is in the hymnal for responsive reading, mainly about the Last Supper. Then sing a couple songs and have a prayer. In the midst of all that we take the bread and then the "wine".

SpokenFor
Aug 24th 2008, 01:12 PM
Back when I was a summer camp counselor for the Methodist Church (15-20 yrs ago), we would have hand washing ceremonies with the campers on the last day. They would wash each other's hands. It was a great way to get them to understand they needed to be of service to each other.