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Jeffinator
Sep 6th 2008, 04:27 AM
In matthew 22:12-14 Jesus is using a parable about the wedding and how no one came so he invited people off the street instead. But he says at the end...
12 So he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you come in here without a wedding garment?’ And he was speechless. 13 Then the king said to the servants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, take him away, and cast him into outer darkness; there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’
14 “For many are called, but few are chosen.”

Who does the man without wedding clothes represent?

livingword26
Sep 6th 2008, 04:43 AM
The wedding garment is the Holy Spirit, who seals all all those saved by the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Kahtar
Sep 6th 2008, 04:44 AM
Our wedding garment is the righteousness of Christ, obtained by faith, given by grace. A free gift, yes, but without it, you cannot enter the wedding.

scourge39
Sep 6th 2008, 06:40 AM
Those without wedding clothes represent those Jews who rejected Christ as their Messiah, and who consequently cannot be clothed in his righteousness.

markedward
Sep 6th 2008, 07:31 AM
Those without wedding clothes represent those Jews who rejected Christ as their Messiah, and who consequently cannot be clothed in his righteousness.Why specifically the Jews, and not Gentiles?

Bethany67
Sep 6th 2008, 07:41 AM
I would've said that broadly-speaking the Jews are represented by the original group who made excuses not to come, and hence the wedding invitation was extended to the people in the byways ie. Gentiles.

If you look at the preceding passages in Matthew 21, Jesus has just had a run-in with the Pharisees, chief priests and elders of the people when they questioned His authority, and He follows with a series of parables - the Two Sons, the Tenants. He has some things to say about how the Jews are rejecting His message but the Gentile 'sinners' aren't:

Jesus said to them, "I tell you the truth, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you. 32For John came to you to show you the way of righteousness, and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes did. And even after you saw this, you did not repent and believe him. Mt 21:31

Therefore I tell you that the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people who will produce its fruit. Mt 21:43

And then He follows with the Wedding Banquet when the chosen guests refuse to come, so the invitation is extended to others. But I wouldn't extrapolate from that that Jews are no longer invited - see Romans 11.

Sold Out
Sep 6th 2008, 03:56 PM
In matthew 22:12-14 Jesus is using a parable about the wedding and how no one came so he invited people off the street instead. But he says at the end...
12 So he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you come in here without a wedding garment?’ And he was speechless. 13 Then the king said to the servants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, take him away, and cast him into outer darkness; there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’
14 “For many are called, but few are chosen.”

Who does the man without wedding clothes represent?

He is an unsaved person who THOUGHT he was saved..hence he showed up to the banquet expecting to get in!

The garment represents salvation in the following passage:

"And he shewed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the LORD, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him. And the LORD said unto Satan, The LORD rebuke thee, O Satan; even the LORD that hath chosen Jerusalem rebuke thee: is not this a brand plucked out of the fire? Now Joshua was clothed with filthy garments, and stood before the angel. And he answered and spake unto those that stood before him, saying, Take away the filthy garments from him. And unto him he said, Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment." Zechariah 3:1-5

David Taylor
Sep 6th 2008, 04:50 PM
In matthew 22:12-14 Jesus is using a parable about the wedding and how no one came so he invited people off the street instead. But he says at the end...
12 So he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you come in here without a wedding garment?’ And he was speechless. 13 Then the king said to the servants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, take him away, and cast him into outer darkness; there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’
14 “For many are called, but few are chosen.”

Who does the man without wedding clothes represent?

That man represents those at judgment day who stand before the Lord; but are cast out; because they never knew Him. They rejected Him during their lives; and now they have no garment (aka salvation from the Lord being born again and washed white from sin in the blood of the Lamb); and are cast out forevermore into the flames; where there is weeping and gnashing of teeth. I only the redeemed of all the ages will remain and enter into the marriage.

scourge39
Sep 6th 2008, 04:56 PM
Why specifically the Jews, and not Gentiles?

Because of Matthew 22:6-7:

6The rest seized his servants, mistreated them and killed them. 7The king was enraged. He sent his army and destroyed those murderers and burned their city. (NIV)

The 'servants' refer to the OT prophets whom many Jews disobeyed, and verse 7 is a prediction of both the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 70 AD. In addition, this parable is preceded by the parable of the tenants (cf. 21:33-46), which refers to the authority that once belonged to the Jewish religious leaders being taken away from them (because of their rejection of both the OT prophets and Christ) and transferred over to another trustworthy group of Jews, the apostles. The apostles, unlike the Jewish religious leaders, recognized Jesus as Messiah and understood the OT prophecies that pointed to his coming. Therefore, they would now serve as the trustworthy heralds of the Gospel. Most of Jesus' parables are meant to condemn the Jewish religious leaders for either their refusal to recognize him as Messiah or their mistreatment of unclean Jews or Gentiles. The parable of the prodigal son was a rebuke of Judaism's unwillingness to evangelize Gentiles and remove racial barriers by accepting Gentiles as their Spiritual brothers and sisters. The conversation in that parable is between the son who stayed and the Father. The son who stayed represents the Jews who had the torah, and were the custodians of Yahweh's truth, etc. and yet refused to reach out to Gentiles in compassion. The jealousy of the son who stayed is meant to ilustrate this. The prodigal son's repentance symbolizes Gentile acceptance of the Gospel. The garments placed on the son who returned illustrate that Gentiles have the same status in God's sight as Jews and are equally important to him as citizens of his kingdom.

Joe King
Sep 6th 2008, 08:15 PM
Anyone who isn't part of the celebration of the marriage of the bride and Christ.

Ta-An
Sep 6th 2008, 08:47 PM
I think here of the verse :
Mt 25:12 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=40&CHAP=25&SEARCH=jesus%20king%20lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=12) But he answered and said, Verily I say unto you, I know you not.

Many are called, but few are chosen

It may be somebody who thinks they can slip into heaven (wedding feast of the Lamb) without having chosen the repentance necessary that goes with salvation :)

superb
Sep 7th 2008, 02:06 PM
The man without wedding clothes represents anyone who does not accept Christ. When at a wedding, there were traditional garments worn. Without the garment, you couldn't stay.
So, your invited to a wedding. Free food, celebrating, and you don't even have to bring a gift. Now all you have to do is wear a robe. But you say no. Your in the masters house, at the masters wedding, going to have the masters food. And the master wants you in his robe. But no thanks, I'm going to wear what I want? Sorry, out you go.

Joe King
Sep 7th 2008, 03:25 PM
The man without wedding clothes represents anyone who does not accept Christ. When at a wedding, there were traditional garments worn. Without the garment, you couldn't stay.
So, your invited to a wedding. Free food, celebrating, and you don't even have to bring a gift. Now all you have to do is wear a robe. But you say no. Your in the masters house, at the masters wedding, going to have the masters food. And the master wants you in his robe. But no thanks, I'm going to wear what I want? Sorry, out you go.


I can't believe people turn down the invitation.

9Marksfan
Sep 7th 2008, 03:27 PM
I think there are far greater numbers in our churches who fit this description than we realise - they are too proud to accept the robe of Christ's righteousness and, like the Jews, are seeking to establish a righteousness of their own - by the things they do - it may be good works, it may be going to church - it may be (and this is the scariest one of all) being happy with Christ's BLESSINGS (as they may think) - but not with Christ Himself - an intellectual or emotional "faith" that does not know true repentance and acceptance of the TRUE gospel. How traic to think that all some people want is forgiveness, a "warm feeling" and a life that is "blessed" - but not Christ as first in their lives.......

Ta-An
Sep 7th 2008, 03:55 PM
I can't believe people turn down the invitation.The responsibility of accepting the invitation is that you need to wear the robes..... and that is maybe in today's world.... bearing the fruit of the Holy Spirit in your life... :idea:

BroRog
Sep 9th 2008, 04:25 AM
A man shows up to a dinner without wearing the appropriate attire.

In my book this means that he showed up for the wrong reason. The people who were wearing the wedding clothes came to see a wedding. The man without the wedding clothes came merely to eat. What he thought was the main thing, i.e lunch, was only secondary to the real main thing, i.e. a wedding.

How many come to Jesus for the wrong reason?

9Marksfan
Sep 9th 2008, 08:43 AM
A man shows up to a dinner without wearing the appropriate attire.

In my book this means that he showed up for the wrong reason. The people who were wearing the wedding clothes came to see a wedding. The man without the wedding clothes came merely to eat. What he thought was the main thing, i.e lunch, was only secondary to the real main thing, i.e. a wedding.

How many come to Jesus for the wrong reason?

EXCELLENT answer, BroRog - how many expect Heaven to be a "casual" occasion........??

9Marksfan
Sep 9th 2008, 08:47 AM
The responsibility of accepting the invitation is that you need to wear the robes..... and that is maybe in today's world.... bearing the fruit of the Holy Spirit in your life... :idea:

While I agree that it is ESSENTIAL that we all bear the fruit of the HS - and that NO ONE will get into Heaven unless his/her life shows at least SOME evidence of this (without holiness, etc), it is not the REASON we are allowed in - whatever fruit/righteousness we display in our lives will always be PARTIAL and imperfect - it is the PERFECT righteousness of Christ that is the wedding garment everyone needs - God demands perfection - no exceptions - Jesus was the only perfect man and unless we are IN HIM and clothed in HIS righteousness, imputed to us as a free gift, by FAITH - we will be like the man who came in the wrong clothes......

ananias
Sep 9th 2008, 12:41 PM
Kahtar + Joe King: Simple, true answer.

Bethany 67 + Scourge 39: Correct perspective, except that it also extends to anyone who refuses God's salvation by Christ Jesus - hence: David Taylor.

No-one had an incorrect answer, but 9Marksfan's answer keeps the Holy Spirit and the love of Christ firmly within the equation:


While I agree that it is ESSENTIAL that we all bear the fruit of the HS - and that NO ONE will get into Heaven unless his/her life shows at least SOME evidence of this (without holiness, etc), it is not the REASON we are allowed in - whatever fruit/righteousness we display in our lives will always be PARTIAL and imperfect - it is the PERFECT righteousness of Christ that is the wedding garment everyone needs - God demands perfection - no exceptions - Jesus was the only perfect man and unless we are IN HIM and clothed in HIS righteousness, imputed to us as a free gift, by FAITH - we will be like the man who came in the wrong clothes......

What pleases God? Two things:

"... This is My beloved Son in whom I am well pleased, hear Him." (Mat.17: 5).

("My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me", Joh.10: 27)

I liked this thread.

ananias

brakelite
Sep 11th 2008, 10:32 PM
In Revelation the redeemed are seen clothed in robes washed white by the blood of the Lamb. The gospels tell us that the blood cleanses sin. So prior to the entrance into heaven the redeemed had filthy robes stained with sin. Sin in this case is not a debt, or burden or even a bondage, but rather a defilement.
So the blood of Jesus cleanses us from sin, and we are seen after this takes place as wearing clean robes, therefore the robes represent our character. The defilement of sin renders us impure and unfit to stand before a holy God. The character reflects the thoughts, values and deeds. It is who we are in our inner private world, and all that we do because of who we are. Whebn Jesus comes the scriptures say that the wicked are so filled with fear and guilt that they attempt to run and hide (aka Adam & Eve) and die under a avalanche rather than face the purity and holiness of the King of Kings.
John fell down as a dead man, even though he was saved, when face to face with Jesus in His glory. (Rev 1:17). The radiance, purity and glory of Jesus overwhelmed even His closest friend. Conscious of his shortcomings, John repeated what took place on the mount of transfiguration.
Daniel did precisely the same thing. (Daniel 10:9-16). Isaiah also recognised his own defilement in the presence of the 'King, the Lord of Hoss.'Paul also fainted on the road to Damascus.

"This is more than sheer overpowering light that blinds the eye. It is a consuming holiness and glory that pierces moral consciousness. Whenever God reveals Himself or discloses something about Himself, it forces human beings to recognise something about themselves. His divine holiness invades their private world. It cannot be avoided. Insight into God's moral nature brings insight into our own. We cannot stand when brought into contrast with God.

When Jesus comes with His own glory, the glory of the Father and the glory of all the angels of heaven, how shall we stand then without robes washed white by the blood of the Lamb? Our characters perfected by the Spirit of God? Christ's righteousness imputed and imparted.