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Literalist-Luke
Sep 24th 2008, 03:34 PM
I have a friend who is currently reading The Shack and who swears it's completely "revolutionizing" her concept of God. She wants me to read it as well as soon as she finishes it.

I've seen a number of comments on the internet regarding this book, and they all seem to go to one extreme or the other. It's either an incredible, life-changing book, or it's one of the most dangerously subtle New Age distortions of Christianity to come out in years.

I'm not really too worried about it "distorting" my views, because I spend enough time in Bible study that I'm usually pretty good at spotting doctrinal errors pretty fast, but since I haven't been able to start reading this book yet (it'll probably be this weekend when I start reading it), I'm curious to see some comments from anybody here who has read it.

So, the floor is open! http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/eyebrows.gif

teddyv
Sep 24th 2008, 08:46 PM
I have a friend who is currently reading The Shack and who swears it's completely "revolutionizing" her concept of God. She wants me to read it as well as soon as she finishes it.

I've seen a number of comments on the internet regarding this book, and they all seem to go to one extreme or the other. It's either an incredible, life-changing book, or it's one of the most dangerously subtle New Age distortions of Christianity to come out in years.

I'm not really too worried about it "distorting" my views, because I spend enough time in Bible study that I'm usually pretty good at spotting doctrinal errors pretty fast, but since I haven't been able to start reading this book yet (it'll probably be this weekend when I start reading it), I'm curious to see some comments from anybody here who has read it.

So, the floor is open! http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/eyebrows.gif
I think there was thread on this a while back in Bible Chat.

EDIT: Scratch that, it was Maturing in Christ
http://bibleforums.org/showthread.php?t=137323&highlight=shack

Pleroo
Sep 24th 2008, 09:05 PM
I appreciated it for what I believe it was: the story of one man's struggle with reconciling the evil he witnessed with the goodness of God, and of God's mercy and grace in bringing that man to a greater wholeness and healing through that struggle. It was an allegorical tale and if you read it as such, there is much there that is thought-provoking and encouraging.

Athanasius
Sep 24th 2008, 09:08 PM
Our Mother,
Who art in the Shack...

Rebelnote
Sep 24th 2008, 09:18 PM
When I first saw title of the topic, it put the song "Love Shack" in my head.
I've never read the book, and have no idea what it's about. I did read Generous Orthodoxy, and some Christians I know believe it's a bunch of new-age mysticism hodgepodge. I personally really enjoyed.

Pleroo
Sep 24th 2008, 10:29 PM
Our Mother,
Who art in the Shack...

:lol:

I knew I'd find you here.

Literalist-Luke
Sep 25th 2008, 02:40 AM
Our Mother,
Who art in the Shack...http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/lol.gif

Gulah Papyrus
Oct 17th 2008, 05:55 AM
I hadn't seen this thread but I just now finished this book and I suggest...I beg...I plead, that it be the next book you read...that is all I have to say.

Peace to you all.:hug:

renthead188
Oct 17th 2008, 06:07 AM
The book didn't "revolutionize" my concept of God, but it definetely portrayed His heart accurately. Or at least, as much as I know it to be.

thepenitent
Oct 17th 2008, 02:21 PM
I read it and thought it was not bad. By "not bad" I mean I really liked it while I was reading it but a week after finishing it I'll never think about it again for the rest of my life. For "revolutionizing" I would recommend Calvin's "Institutes of Christian Religion", the greatest theological book ever written (excepte the Bible of course) and a book I continually come back to over and over. If I could only have one work in my library other than the Bible itself it would be the Institutes.

winwun
Oct 17th 2008, 09:59 PM
I read it and found it to be pretty much a tour de force, but do concede that it was thought provoking to the extent that you realized the Trinity can take many forms snd still be the Trinity . . .

I have been loath (my whole life) to accept one person's word as "the word", and rely instead on perusing what is written, forming my own opinion based on God's allowance for the opinion to ease and soothe my heart.

After all, our so called "leaders" have only their personal charisma to substantiate their speakings or writings.

The Shack was a good read, no more, and certainly no less.

apothanein kerdos
Oct 17th 2008, 10:44 PM
I wrote a long review of it:

Here (http://thechristianwatershed.com/2008/06/13/review-of-william-p-youngs-the-shack/)

Anyone who says a fictional book that doesn't go back to Scripture "revolutionizes" their view of God, I'd tend to argue that revolution isn't a good one.

karenoka27
Oct 17th 2008, 11:33 PM
Our Mother,
Who art in the Shack...
I laugh every time I read this post.

I read the book. The first part was pretty good and sad I might add. Once it got in the shack and met Mother God, I started to get not so sure about the whole thing. Mother God listening to Rock with her headphones on and cooking dinner/breakfast?
There was just a lot wrong with the whole thing aside from the fact that the man/father in the story was never introduced to Jesus Christ in a manner that would lead to His salvation.

I love to read, but I do not recommend this book. It was a waste of my reading time. In my opinion.

jesuslover1968
Oct 17th 2008, 11:38 PM
Scary... I bought the book awhile back but haven't read it yet. Sounds like that's probably a good thing..,

Gulah Papyrus
Oct 18th 2008, 04:46 AM
I love to read, but I do not recommend this book. It was a waste of my reading time. In my opinion.Good thing it was such a quick read.;) ...maybe 5 hours tops including bathroom breaks? ...and I'm a slow reader.

JesusLover, I don't think 'scary' would be the right word. I think you should give it a read and see for yourself. There are definitely some very positive things that can be taken out of it.

nea27
Oct 19th 2008, 12:34 PM
I read the book a few months ago after it being recommended by a friend of mine. I enjoy reading but am not particularly fast and yet i read this book in a few days....I really enjoyed it and for me personally, it made me think....But i know its a work of fiction and it doesn't replace the bible and since i've read it and put it away, i doubt i will ever read it again....But for me, yes it is a good book and if it gets people reaching for there bibles to check things out, it can only be good.

Literalist-Luke
Oct 19th 2008, 08:33 PM
If it gets people reaching for there bibles to check things out, it can only be good.A very sensible attitude. :yes:

Libre
Jan 14th 2009, 09:37 PM
I was looking for a thread on this. I'm in the middle of the book, and I love it. I can't till my before-bed reading time at night to read a chapter or two. I could just read it all at once, but I'm savoring it.

I agree with Michael W Smith who said it makes you want more of God. It is of course, fiction. But I am not much of a literalist, so can forgive some seeming missteps by the author. This sort of book isn't meant to nail God down. That would be like nailing Jello to the wall, anyway. It the feeling, the mood, that is the point of the book. To draw us into thinking of God and His goodness and His complexity in the godhead - the great mystery that we cannot begin to understand.

I've found myself stopping and closing my eyes and imagining the scenes. I hope there is a movie to come. Picturing Sarayu - the Holy Spirit - is really tough. And her fractal garden. A really cool job for special effects, for sure.

And I've found myself whispering, Yes, that's how I feel. Getting teary eyed at times, too. Last night, I actually hit the mattress with my fist and said, Yes, out loud.

tt1106
Jan 14th 2009, 09:50 PM
I thought it was not-biblical. But I liked it also. It is a nice story with a good ending. I did object to my 12 year olds SUnday School teacher introducing it into the curriculum, but as stated, I liked it much more than I thought I would.

tango
Jan 14th 2009, 10:17 PM
I have a friend who is currently reading The Shack and who swears it's completely "revolutionizing" her concept of God. She wants me to read it as well as soon as she finishes it.

I've seen a number of comments on the internet regarding this book, and they all seem to go to one extreme or the other. It's either an incredible, life-changing book, or it's one of the most dangerously subtle New Age distortions of Christianity to come out in years.

I'm not really too worried about it "distorting" my views, because I spend enough time in Bible study that I'm usually pretty good at spotting doctrinal errors pretty fast, but since I haven't been able to start reading this book yet (it'll probably be this weekend when I start reading it), I'm curious to see some comments from anybody here who has read it.

So, the floor is open! http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w40/litluke/eyebrows.gif

I've heard a few people say it's verging on heretical, and other people say there's nothing wrong with it. I haven't read it myself, but from what I can see if you regard it as a work of fiction then you'll be OK with it. It does seem to portray the Trinity in a rather unconventional manner, but then the story of Narnia loosely portrays Jesus as a lion and people have no problem with that.

If you regard it as a work of theological truth you'll probably find yourself having troubles. I wouldn't let any book like that change my thinking of God, any more than I'd let the Narnia chronicles encourage me to think of Jesus as a resurrected big cat.

TerriP
Jan 14th 2009, 10:42 PM
I generally stay away from books or reading or watching anything that is not real adherent to - or at the very least certainly not purposefully rejecting or renouncing - the Word, principally because I believe in the spirituality of all we feed into our eyes and ears, whether it be the good stuff or the bad - now I know that to be true and Scriptural. But also because it is a waste of time!

However, I believe "The Shack" is a good read for someone in the same or similar situation as the main character, that is, in the middle of a horrific tragedy. If one does not have a solid basis and foundation in the Word of God, something like that could be devastating. That could lead one down that path of "why do bad things happen to good people", which fits in quite nicely with our enemy's plans of stealing, killing, and destroying. For this purpose I believe this is a very good read. At least I think it would get them off the inclination to blame God, which is a critical and possibly a fatal error.

Now. Having said that, if I were to recommend The Shack to someone to read, (which I have), I would certainly follow up with them for discussion, particulary if the person to whom I recommended the book does not have a solid foundation in the Word. And to reply to a previous commentary in this thread, I would indeed think that reading The Shack would lead to a hunger to know God more, to be closer to Him, to find out more about Him.

People are looking for the Truth and not finding it. Or, as Sir Winston Churchill said, "Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened." If The Shack stirs up hunger and helps someone get to the Truth, to Jesus and His Saving Grace.... then more power to them.

Luke34
Jan 15th 2009, 03:05 AM
I still haven't finished The Shack (sorry, William P. Young, but David Foster Wallace takes precedence over you), and so can't speak to the spiritual content, but I will say that Young is kind of an awful stylist of the language (man, I don't know how I'm going to go back to that after reading Wallace's story "Church Not Made with Hands," which has some of the most beautiful writing qua writing I've ever read). As I noted, at unnecessary length, here (http://bibleforums.org/showpost.php?p=1920602&postcount=27).