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immortality
Oct 2nd 2008, 11:19 PM
as depicted in the "parable of the ten virgins", jesus said there will be many individuals who will have been living their lives in a bubble of false sense of security. when jesus returns, there will apparently be a plethora of people who will believe themselves eligible to participate in the kingdom of heaven.

however, quite the opposite will be true. they will not only be denied a residence in the kingdom of heaven, but rather they will be sent to to live eternally in the abode of torment: hell.

"At that time the kingdom of heaven will be like ten virgins who took their lamps and went out to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were foolish and five were wise. The foolish ones took their lamps but did not take any oil with them. The wise, however, took oil in jars along with their lamps. The bridegroom was a long time in coming, and they all became drowsy and fell asleep.

"At midnight the cry rang out: 'Here's the bridegroom! Come out to meet him!'

"Then all the virgins woke up and trimmed their lamps. The foolish ones said to the wise, 'Give us some of your oil; our lamps are going out.'

"'No,' they replied, 'there may not be enough for both us and you. Instead, go to those who sell oil and buy some for yourselves.'

"But while they were on their way to buy the oil, the bridegroom arrived. The virgins who were ready went in with him to the wedding banquet. And the door was shut.

"Later the others also came. 'Sir! Sir!' they said. 'Open the door for us!'

"But he replied, 'I tell you the truth, I don't know you.'

"Therefore keep watch, because you do not know the day or the hour." [matthew 25:1-13]

oil is symbolic of the holy spirit. those who do not have the holy spirit, according to scripture, are not saved.

when these individuals came to their senses and realized they were in fact not saved, they then went off to "buy oil", that is, they attempted to repent and be saved.

jesus then came at an unexpected hour and they were found in their fallen state without the blood of jesus christ to cover their unrighteousness.

additionally, merely recognizing the existence of jesus christ does not necessarily make you saved. according to scripture, the demons believe, and yet they are damned entities. jesus needs to be absolutely everything in your life - not just a cherry on top.

"Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that does the will of my Father which is in heaven.

Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?

And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity." [matthew 7:21-23]

my friends, don't be a foolish virgin. make sure you are saved while there is still time. go to the store and buy oil today, as it is generously being given away in mass quantities. this sale won't last forever...

AliveinChristDave
Oct 3rd 2008, 01:42 AM
as depicted in the "parable of the ten virgins", jesus said there will be many individuals who will have been living their lives in a bubble of false sense of security. when jesus returns, there will apparently be a plethora of people who will believe themselves eligible to participate in the kingdom of heaven.

however, quite the opposite will be true. they will not only be denied a residence in the kingdom of heaven, but rather they will be sent to to live eternally in the abode of torment: hell.

my friends, don't be a foolish virgin. make sure you are saved while there is still time. go to the store and buy oil today, as it is generously being given away in mass quantities. this sale won't last forever...

To equate this to going to hell or heaven is not sound biblical
interpretation.
All the women were virgins. It has nothing to do with what they believe themselves to be and everything with how God saw them.
God said ten were wise and ten were foolish. It is possible for a believer to be foolish and do foolish acts.
God didn't send the five foolish virgins to hell. No where does Christ say that and no where in the context of Matt. 25 is Christ even remotely refering to sending anyone to hell.
It's possible for believers to lose our rewards. Entering into the marrage supper is a reward. All ten were headed that way. It was a custom for the young girls to have to wait until everything was set up by the groom and made ready for them.
Christ has a place of blessing for us. He will reward us if we are faithful but if we aren't faithful he doesn't send us to hell, we just loose rewards.
God's plan for you and me is for us to be overcomers. The wise virgins overcome. They were the firstfruits. They were the prize of the harvest.
He that overcometh shall inherit all things. (Rev. 21:7) If you don't overcome you won't inherit all things. He didn't say you wouldn't inherit anything--Just not all things. There will be those in eternity who did not overcome and will not inherit all things.
Be lulled to sleep by a false sense of security by believing all you have to do is accept Jesus and you will miss the Light that will guide you into more light.

immortality
Oct 3rd 2008, 02:38 AM
To equate this to going to hell or heaven is not sound biblical
interpretation.

the parable of the ten virgins is indeed a heaven and hell scenario.

those who don't have the holy spirit ("oil") are not saved, therefore are in danger of going to hell. they are "foolish" because they falsely believe themselves saved.

likewise, the only individuals who will be able to enter heaven are those who have the holy spirit in them.

charles spurgeon says it best:
"Friend, if you don't have the Holy Spirit, then you are nothing better — whatever you are, or whatever you may be — than the fall of Adam left you. That is to say, you are a fallen creature, having only capacities to live here in sin and to live forever in torment; but you don't have the capacity to live in heaven at all, for you do not have the Holy Spirit; and therefore you are unable to know or enjoy spiritual things. And mark this, a man may be in this state, and be a carnal man, and yet he may have all the virtues that could grace a Christian; but with all these, if he doesn't have the Holy Spirit, he has not advanced an inch further than where Adam's fall left him—that is, condemned and under the curse. Yes, and he may practice religion with all his might—he may share in the Lord's Supper and be baptized, and may be the most devout person in church; but if he does not have the Holy Spirit he has not moved a solitary inch from where he was, for he is still “a slave to sin,” a lost soul. Further, he may pick up religious phrases until he talks very fast about religion; he may read biographies until he seems to be a deeply taught child of God; he may be able to write an article on the deep experience of a believer; but if this experience is not his own, if he has not received it by the Holy Spirit of the living God, he is still nothing more than a carnal man, and heaven is to him a place to which there is no entrance.

Further, he might go so far as to become a minister of the gospel, and a successful minister too, and God may bless the word that he preaches to the salvation of sinners, but unless he has received the Holy Spirit, even if he is as eloquent as Apollos, and as earnest as Paul, he is nothing more than a mere man, without a capacity for spiritual things.

No, to top it all, he might even have the power of working miracles, as Judas had—he might even be received into the Church as a believer, as was Simon Magus, and after all that, though he had cast out devils, though he had healed the sick, though he had worked miracles, he might have the gates of heaven shut in his face, if he had not received the Holy Spirit. For this is the most important thing, without which all others are in vain—the receiving of the Holy Spirit of the living God."

AliveinChristDave
Oct 3rd 2008, 03:23 AM
the parable of the ten virgins is indeed a heaven and hell scenario.

those who don't have the holy spirit ("oil") are not saved, therefore are in danger of going to hell. they are "foolish" because they falsely believe themselves saved.

likewise, the only individuals who will be able to enter heaven are those who have the holy spirit in them.

charles spurgeon says it best:

"Friend, if you don't have the Holy Spirit, then you are nothing better — whatever you are, or whatever you may be — than the fall of Adam left you. That is to say, you are a fallen creature, having only capacities to live here in sin and to live forever in torment; but you don't have the capacity to live in heaven at all, for you do not have the Holy Spirit; and therefore you are unable to know or enjoy spiritual things. And mark this, a man may be in this state, and be a carnal man, and yet he may have all the virtues that could grace a Christian; but with all these, if he doesn't have the Holy Spirit, he has not advanced an inch further than where Adam's fall left him—that is, condemned and under the curse. Yes, and he may practice religion with all his might—he may share in the Lord's Supper and be baptized, and may be the most devout person in church; but if he does not have the Holy Spirit he has not moved a solitary inch from where he was, for he is still “a slave to sin,” a lost soul. Further, he may pick up religious phrases until he talks very fast about religion; he may read biographies until he seems to be a deeply taught child of God; he may be able to write an article on the deep experience of a believer; but if this experience is not his own, if he has not received it by the Holy Spirit of the living God, he is still nothing more than a carnal man, and heaven is to him a place to which there is no entrance.

Further, he might go so far as to become a minister of the gospel, and a successful minister too, and God may bless the word that he preaches to the salvation of sinners, but unless he has received the Holy Spirit, even if he is as eloquent as Apollos, and as earnest as Paul, he is nothing more than a mere man, without a capacity for spiritual things.

No, to top it all, he might even have the power of working miracles, as Judas had—he might even be received into the Church as a believer, as was Simon Magus, and after all that, though he had cast out devils, though he had healed the sick, though he had worked miracles, he might have the gates of heaven shut in his face, if he had not received the Holy Spirit. For this is the most important thing, without which all others are in vain—the receiving of the Holy Spirit of the living God."


I love Charles Spurgeon. He's probably one of the most read, least understood people of the ages.

But, if you relate this parable having or not having the Holy Spirit you miss the point Jesus was trying to teach us.
The point of this parable was to teach us not to go to sleep and become unprepared.
Sleep is the cause of us not being aware of things going on around us.
When we don't watch, the enemy works.
Remember in the parable of the wheat and tares it says while men slept the enemy sowed the tares. (Matt. 13:25)
Go to sleep and you loose your footing. Go to sleep and the enemy takes advantage of you.
Later on in this parable the foolish virgins showed up for the wedding. They'd gone to the merchants and bought oil. No way they'd ever attempted to enter without a light.
So, in your way of thinking, they went and bought some salvation but it was too late? They got it and it wasn't good enough? That doesn't make sense.
First of all we don't buy our salvation. It's paid in full by Jesus Christ.
It's a gift. You can't buy a gift or it ceases being a gift.
Also, if you believe they bought salvation, do you believe it's a possiblity to not buy enough and then die and go to hell?
Spurgeon surely didn't believe that. He said the person without the spirit hadn't advanced any further than the place Adam left him, which was dead in transpasses and sin.
You can't die, wake up and then die again.

Lars777
Oct 3rd 2008, 03:52 AM
"Then the kingdom of heaven shall be compared to ten maidens who took their lamps and went to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. For when the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them; but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps. As the bridegroom was delayed, they all slumbered and slept. But at midnight there was a cry, 'Behold, the bridegroom! Come out to meet him.'" (Matthew 25:1-6)




Weddings were always held at night in the East, and, as far as I know, it is still the custom in these areas. Often the festivities lasted for an entire week and at any time during that week the bridal party was expected to appear.

The bridegroom would come to get his bride and they would walk together to the site of the wedding, taking the longest possible route through the town. There would be various groups of people waiting at different corners to join the wedding party as they went toward the wedding. That is the background of the picture our Lord draws here.


Here are ten young girls waiting to join the wedding party. They are expecting the bridegroom (some accounts read, "and the bride") and therefore they are waiting expectantly.

Now, as in the previous parable of the household which was waiting for its absent lord, this parable obviously is intended to describe us.

Our Lord knew at this time that he was soon going away. He knew there would be an intervening period of time before his return again and he is describing by means of these three parables what he means by his command, watch: "Watch therefore for you know neither the day nor the hour when your lord comes," (Matthew 25:13). What he means by "watch" is brought out in these parables:


In this parable of the ten maidens we learn another phase of what "watching" means. Here is another challenge to find hidden truth.

One of the exciting things about parables is to learn to discover such hidden truths and to dig them out by means of the clues that are given. Here is this story about ten girls, waiting for the bridegroom's coming and certain clues are given to us to reveal the meaning our Lord is after.

Notice, first of all, that there is a division among these ten. They fall into two groups: five were wise, and five were foolish. The first question therefore that immediately confronts us is, "What makes the difference?"

In what way are five wise, and the other five foolish? You can see immediately that there were certain very similar things about all ten of them. They all had lamps, so that is not the ground of division. Also, they all had oil when they started; so it is not that.

Further, they all were expecting the bridegroom's coming; they all had a sense of expectation. Also, when he was delayed, they all went to sleep.

Though that does not mark the ground of division yet it is a very significant thing. In each of these parables the Lord clearly indicates that his second coming is going to be long delayed. Surely that is most important.

There are some who teach that Jesus was mistaken about the time of his return. They say that the Scriptures indicate that he was to come back immediately, and that all the early Christians expected him to return promptly because that is what he himself said.

These teachers tell us that Jesus was wrong. He was obviously mistaken about the time of his return, so they reject completely his whole teaching concerning his return on the basis that he was mistaken about its timing. But Jesus did not teach a soon return at all.

He clearly indicated, not only by implication and indirect statement, as in this parable, but also very specifically that it would be a long time before his return. The bridegroom would be delayed.

In the previous parable of the household there is the same thing. The servant says to himself, "My lord delays his coming," (Matthew 24:48). Also in the following parable we find it even clearer.

"After a long time" (Matthew 25:19) the master comes to demand an accounting from his servants. Jesus clearly taught that it would be a long time before his return to earth again.

So, while they were waiting for the bridegroom, the ten maidens fell asleep. Here again some who read this parable misinterpret it and say that this is wrong; these girls should never have slept.

They liken it to Christians who forget about the coming of the Lord, lose all interest in his appearing, and get involved in life's matters. But there is nothing in this story to indicate that it was wrong for these girls to sleep.

It was a perfectly natural thing for them to do. After all, it was night, and since it was a festive occasion and they could not do any work there is no reason why they should not sleep.

They were simply waiting for the bridegroom to appear, and, when he was delayed, it was only natural for them to catch a few winks while waiting. Doubtless they placed some kind of a watch to arouse them when the bridegroom does appear, for this is what happened.

Our Lord never indicates any blame toward these maidens because they slept. The foolish slept, and the wise as well. We must be careful, in interpreting these stories, not to read into them things that are not implied.

It is, perhaps, suggestive that our Lord records that they all slept. This indicates that when he said "watch" he clearly did not mean that we are to be constantly thinking about his return.

He underscores the fact that watching involves doing perfectly normal things while waiting. Work needs to be done. Babies must be changed. Buses must operate.

Banks have to be run. Schools must be operated, and studies engaged in. Hospitals have to be open; all types of activities must go on. There is nothing wrong with this.

To be involved in the natural normal affairs of life does not mean that you stopped waiting for the Lord's return; it is all part of the process, a perfectly normal part.

But now, according to the story, at midnight came a cry, "Behold, the bridegroom! Come out to meet him." That immediately plunges us into the rest of the story,

"Then all those maidens rose and trimmed their lamps. And the foolish said to the wise, 'Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out.' But the wise replied, 'Perhaps there will not be enough for us and for you; go rather to the dealers and buy for yourselves.'

And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went in with him to the marriage feast; and the door was shut. Afterward the other maidens came also, saying, 'Lord, lord, open to us.' But he replied, 'Truly, I say to you, I do not know you.' Watch therefore for you know neither the day nor the hour." (Matthew 25:7-13)

It is immediately evident from this that the crucial difference between the wise and the foolish lay in the fact that the wise had extra oil. They all had oil to begin with, but the wise took along an extra supply.

That is what made it possible for them to endure the unexpected delay of the bridegroom.

Surely that is the crucial point is it not? The whole parable hangs on this one thing: There was with the wise an extra hidden supply of oil.

There are two things that are made clear by this part of the story: One is that without a light these maidens could not get into the marriage feast. Our Lord does not say why, but it is obviously clear that without a light they would not be admitted.

The lamp -- or light -- is used throughout Scripture as a symbol of knowledge or understanding. We use it the same way today. We say, "I'd like a little more light on this subject," meaning "I need more knowledge of it."

So it is in this story. All ten had some light, some knowledge or understanding, but five had a deeper, hidden, resource of light.

If we apply this to ourselves, we can see how truly it fits. Every one here has a certain degree of light about our Lord's return and its relation to the course of history.

In that respect we all have light amid the darkness of the age in which we live. We know more than those who do not understand this truth. We know there is a purpose to history, and that it is all going to end according to schedule.

Symbolically, these maidens all had to have at least this much knowledge. Light was supplied by the oil, and therefore it was absolutely essential that they have an adequate supply of oil, otherwise their light would go out.

It is also clear from this account that they could not borrow another's supply. When the bridegroom came and their lights began to flicker from lack of oil, the foolish said to the wise, "Give us of your oil, for our lights are going out." But the wise said, "No, we cannot do that, otherwise we will not have enough for ourselves.

You'll have to go yourself and get more." But it was too late. By the time the foolish returned, the door was shut, and they were met by this word of the Lord's, "I never knew you," and, of course, weddings are no place for strangers.

There are some who feel the Lord is very unfair here, that he should have let these maidens in. After all, they too were earnestly, sincerely waiting for his return, and the fact that they did not have enough oil was hardly their fault for they did not realize that he was going to be delayed.

Therefore he ought to have let them in. But we must be careful, when we read these parables, not to read them from our limited point of view. The Lord is right about what he says; he always is.

We therefore must not challenge his appraisal of a situation. He knows what he is talking about. When he excludes these five foolish ones he is revealing to us that we must seek seriously his reason for doing so.

He says he never knew them, they were strangers to him. They never were a part of the true family, waiting for the bridegroom. We must understand what it is, then, which rendered them strangers. As we have already seen, it centers on this matter of the oil.

Oil, throughout the Scriptures, is commonly used as a type or picture of the Holy Spirit. Some of you remember that in the book of Zechariah the prophet was given a vision of two olive trees standing, one on either side of a lampstand, and the oil from the olive trees dripped into a bowl on top of the lampstand.

It was the oil, constantly flowing down, which caused the lamps in the lampstand to burn. Zechariah was told that the oil symbolized the Spirit of God. It is here we have that great quotation which is frequently heard, although very few people realize where it is from.

Zechariah is told, "Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the Lord of hosts," (Zechariah 4:6b KJV). The oil is a picture of the power of the Holy Spirit which keeps the light of knowledge and truth burning brightly.

This is also what we have here in this parable. It is the ministry of the Holy Spirit, revealing truth, revealing knowledge.

The overall picture is that of a group of people very much like you and me. If we would take this parable as our Lord intended it to be taken, as a picture of those who are living in the time between his first coming and his second, who are waiting for his appearing and who have some understanding of the fact that he is coming again, then this becomes very much the same kind of group as is described in the parable.

There are certain wise among us who have an extra supply of oil, a supply adequate to meet the test of whatever may come. But there are also some among us, without question, who are foolish, who have been going to church week after week agreeing with and understanding much of the doctrine of our Lord's return, but who lack an adequate supply of oil, who have never really discovered the full ministry of the Spirit.

There is a ministry of the Holy Spirit to the minds and hearts of those who are not yet born again. He enlightens them to a degree, as they read the Bible, and they understand such truth as the Lord's return, but they have never yet come to the place where the truth has really gripped them.

They have understood it, but it has not yet gripped and held them. They have not yet come into a personal knowledge of the One whom the truth is to reveal, the Lord Jesus Christ.

That is the whole purpose of Bible study. It is not to learn merely what God is going to do with the world, or to understand your own psychological make-up; it is rather that you might come to understand and to know personally, in a day-by-day living relationship, the Lord Jesus Christ who has come to live within you.

That is the basis for true life. That, of course, is the extra flask of oil hidden away inside. Those who have it do not look any different than anyone else. No one sees it there.

But when the hour of testing comes, when the pressures come, their light does not go out. They will hold to the truth and maintain it.

That is the picture here in this parable. As life moves on, and cares press upon us, our early zeal as Christians fades and the excitement of knowing God dims.

That is when the test comes. Then our knowledge of Christ must go deeper than the head; it must reach the heart.

We must become basically changed by the truth. That is what our Lord is bringing out. There is a kind of Christian veneer which can be put on. You can learn in Sunday school how to act like a Christian.

You can learn what Christian truth is, learn the doctrines of Christianity, learn the truth it teaches. You can fill your head with this kind of thing and display it on Sundays, but it will not make any essential difference in your life during the week, at home.

These are the foolish. They have no extra oil. They have truth for the surface of life, but none for the depths, the crises.

They know the doctrine of the Scripture, but they do not know the power of it. It is in their head but it has never reached the heart.

They believe in Jesus as Savior, but they have never known him as a living Lord. That is what makes the difference. That is what our Lord is saying. Without that you cannot properly watch for his appearing.

markedward
Oct 3rd 2008, 05:15 AM
To equate this to going to hell or heaven is not sound biblical interpretation.

But while they were on their way to buy the oil, the bridegroom arrived. The virgins who were ready went in with him to the wedding banquet. And the door was shut.

Later the others also came. "Sir! Sir!" they said. "Open the door for us!"

But he replied, "I tell you the truth, I don't know you."

Compare to...

"Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, 'Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and in your name drive out demons and perform many miracles?' Then I will tell them plainly, 'I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!'"

Christ plainly says that only those who do the will of God will enter the kingdom of heaven. To those who do evil and claim they know Christ, He will say "I never knew you. Away from Me."

Read the full chapter 25. We are given two parables about the kingdom of heaven. In the first parable, the virgins who were wise and carried oil were the ones let into the wedding, i.e. the kingdom of heaven. The foolish were the ones barred entry. In the second parable, the servants who were wise made profit with their money, and they were the ones who "shared their master's happiness." The foolish did not profit with their money, and were cast outside "into the darkness".

In both parables we have wise people who did what was good and the Lord accepted them into His companionship, while there are also foolish people who did not do what was good even though they claimed to, and they were rejected from the kingdom for it. Right after these parables, Christ describes the throne judgment, and how the righteous will inherit the kingdom of heaven while the wicked will be punished. The righteous who inherit the kingdom are those who were the wises ones in the two parables, while the wicked are those who were the foolish ones in the two parables.

And both parables fit right back to what Jesus said long before:

"Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, 'Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and in your name drive out demons and perform many miracles?' Then I will tell them plainly, 'I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!'"

In the first parable, the foolish girls cried out, "But we know the bridegroom!" And He responded "I don't know you." In the second parable, the foolish servant claimed, "See master? I kept the money you gave me for myself and hid it away." And He responded "Away from me, to the outer darkness." The wise maidens and wise servants gain entry to the kingdom of heaven, while the foolish maidens and foolish servants will claim, "Lord, lord!" but He will respond to them, "I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers." The righteous will be given eternal life, and the wicked will be given eternal punishment.

So yes... the parable of the ten virgins is a "heaven and hell" scenario.

AliveinChristDave
Oct 3rd 2008, 03:27 PM
They believe in Jesus as Savior, but they have never known him as a living Lord. That is what makes the difference. That is what our Lord is saying. Without that you cannot properly watch for his appearing.

You post is so long I'm not sure I digested everything you said but in general I agree with everything you wrote--Even the last statement about Lordship salvation.
The only division is I believe the scripture does not teach that any believer who does not make Jesus Lord of their life goes to hell.
That's salvation by works plus it encompasses the error of Calvinism which is a false teaching.
The parable teaches that any believer who does not stay awake and prepared will miss out on the marriage supper of the lamb. They won't sit at the table with Christ and the faithful but will have a place reserved for them away from the supper with the hypocrites.
Reading heaven and hell into this parable or any parable in Matt. 25 destroys the truths Christ was trying to get across.

AliveinChristDave
Oct 3rd 2008, 03:54 PM
But while they were on their way to buy the oil, the bridegroom arrived. The virgins who were ready went in with him to the wedding banquet. And the door was shut.

Later the others also came. "Sir! Sir!" they said. "Open the door for us!"

But he replied, "I tell you the truth, I don't know you."

Compare to...

"Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, 'Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and in your name drive out demons and perform many miracles?' Then I will tell them plainly, 'I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!'"

Christ plainly says that only those who do the will of God will enter the kingdom of heaven. To those who do evil and claim they know Christ, He will say "I never knew you. Away from Me."

Read the full chapter 25. We are given two parables about the kingdom of heaven. In the first parable, the virgins who were wise and carried oil were the ones let into the wedding, i.e. the kingdom of heaven. The foolish were the ones barred entry. In the second parable, the servants who were wise made profit with their money, and they were the ones who "shared their master's happiness." The foolish did not profit with their money, and were cast outside "into the darkness".

In both parables we have wise people who did what was good and the Lord accepted them into His companionship, while there are also foolish people who did not do what was good even though they claimed to, and they were rejected from the kingdom for it. Right after these parables, Christ describes the throne judgment, and how the righteous will inherit the kingdom of heaven while the wicked will be punished. The righteous who inherit the kingdom are those who were the wises ones in the two parables, while the wicked are those who were the foolish ones in the two parables.

And both parables fit right back to what Jesus said long before:

"Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, 'Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and in your name drive out demons and perform many miracles?' Then I will tell them plainly, 'I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!'"

In the first parable, the foolish girls cried out, "But we know the bridegroom!" And He responded "I don't know you." In the second parable, the foolish servant claimed, "See master? I kept the money you gave me for myself and hid it away." And He responded "Away from me, to the outer darkness." The wise maidens and wise servants gain entry to the kingdom of heaven, while the foolish maidens and foolish servants will claim, "Lord, lord!" but He will respond to them, "I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers." The righteous will be given eternal life, and the wicked will be given eternal punishment.

So yes... the parable of the ten virgins is a "heaven and hell" scenario.


I think the whole issue boils down to understanding what Christ taught in Matt. 7 when he said "Strait is the gate and narrow the way that leads to life and few there be that find it."
We enter the gate when we believe on Jesus as our Savior. Then we begin the journey on the narrow way to the celestial city as John Bunyon put it.
If you fall away from the narrow way you don't get kicked out side the gate.
The battle for us believers is staying on the way, not trying to stay inside the gate.
Jesus paid for the gate when He died for us. We can't do anything to warrant or earn or keep or improve on what Christ did for us.
He also made it possible for us believers, once we enter into Him through the gate to walk in fulness of life and to overcome every obstacle the devil and flesh thrown in our way.
But as a believer we have a volition. We can either choose to allow the power of God to work in us (oil) through the Holy Ghost or we can reject that power and suffer the consequences.
Rejecting that power does not determine whether or not we had it in the first place. Rejecting the power of God in our life doesn't determine if we have truly believed.
Accepting the power of God keeps us on the narrow path and will result in greater rewards on the day of judgment
All ten virgins were "saved." In other words, they'd accepted the free gift of God and responded to the invitation to come to the wedding supper.
Only five prepared. The other five were foolish and didn't prepare.
Many are called--many many hear the call of God to come to Him through Christ and have their life changed.
Few are chosen-few who hear the call ever really get prepared for eternity through the power of God working in them to the point Christ is ever reproduced in them and they walk in the freedom of Sons of God.

Dragonfighter1
Oct 3rd 2008, 05:32 PM
I think this thread is becoming divisive.(emphasis on becoming)

It is dangerous to make doctrine out of parables. It is dangerous to make doctrine out of illustrations and stories. Sometimes doctrine fits the story well, other times the story only amplifies a small part of the doctrine.

I will not try to fit doctrine around or into a story/parable.

I WILL use it for its intended purpose though.

My brothers, let us agree to disagree on this one that we do not harm one another with overly harsh words.:pray: