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ConservChrist
Oct 6th 2008, 10:21 PM
History of the Bible


Since creation, people have passed their stories down to the younger of the generations; this was done orally, later adding pictures and drawings, and then scrolls, pages, and books. These old scrolls, pages, and books begot the Bible, which suggestively came about, completely finished, Old Testament and New Testament, at around ninety A.D. The canon of Scripture ultimately finalized the Bible.

One of the most interesting things about the Bible and its history is the languages used throughout, which consisted of mainly Hebrew and Greek. The authors of the Bible and the time frame they took to make up the completed Bible are valued higher than the languages used throughout the Scriptures. However, after the canonization process, which was the completion of the entire Bible, the Scriptures went through many persecutions. Many Christians fought, literally, for their lives to preserve the Bible and keep it untouched forming a secret alliance with safe houses and refuges. A sort of “graffiti” appeared over a course of time amongst the Christians to symbolize safety and peace. Preservation of the Scriptures took a giant step when the Jewish scribes formed a scribal system that enabled them to guarantee the exactness of the Bible from scroll to scroll. There were, however, a few manuscripts disputed upon after the canonization process, which consisted of choosing the arrangement of the books of the Bible. (Renard, pgs. 127-128; Howard, pgs. 7-35, 45; “History of the Bible,” i.r.; “Bible Translations,” i.r.; “Bible Manuscripts,” i.r.; Cornwell, i.r.; Grudem, pgs. 54-62.)

Before King Cyrus of Persia held the Jews captive for seventy years, beginning around 468 BC, and ending around 536 – 538 BC, most of the Old Testament had been mostly written in Hebrew. However, after seventy years in captivity, the Jews began to loose the knowledge of their original tongue. Only the elders, Ezra and Daniel remembered and understood Hebrew. Ezra, however, did not return with the Jews until 458 BC and thereafter revised the Torah, or the first five books of the Old Testament. Most of the Old Testament communicated the Hebrew language; however, after the loss of most of the Hebrew tongue, the language gave way to Aramaic, the sister language to Hebrew. The Turgums, books explaining how to live life well with God and the fellow human, were the earliest known Aramaic translations of the Hebrew Bible. These were known as “wisdom” books and include Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes.

The documentation of how everything began, the origins of the world and the universe it resides in, takes place in Genesis, which means “In the Beginning.” Moses, an obedient and faithful man of God, wrote the first five books of the Bible called the Torah. Genesis, the first book, also covers the creation of man, the introduction of evil, which is ultimately the absence of God, and the fall of man due to this evil. Moses covered the life of Abraham, the father of the Jews, and wrote how God established with Abraham His plans for the human race. By research of Jewish rabbis, or Jewish teachers, six hundred thirteen separate commandments were found in the Law of Moses. Moses stated three hundred sixty-five of them negatively and two hundred forty-eight of them positively. Six hundred eleven of these commandments God gave through Moses but the first two God spoke directly. Coincidence or not, six hundred eleven generates the numerical value of the word Torah, which means, “law,” “commandment,” or “instruction.” Most of the numbers used in the Bible had a significant value; for example, one symbolized God’s unity, three symbolized the Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, seven symbolized completion or perfection, twelve symbolized the tribes of Israel and the number of apostles, and forty commonly stood for a time frame. Furthermore, two books in the Bible did not mention God. Song of Solomon, which served as a collection of love poetry, much of which was explicit, even erotic, and the book of Esther, which speaks of the Jewish people’s life and successor under Persian rule neglected to refer to God. Due to the canonization of the Old Testament, the first seventeen books, Genesis through Esther, were organized in chronological order, beginning with creation and ending with the Jews in exile. Some of the other books, however, do not fall in chronological order. For example, the prophetic books begin with the three longest books first. All in all, the Bible consists of sixty-six books written about one thousand six hundred years ago, and authored by at least forty men. The Old Testament makes up thirty-nine books written from one thousand five hundred B.C. to four hundred B.C., and the New Testament is comprised of twenty-seven books written between forty and ninety A.D. Except fort he arrangement of the books, the Christian Old Testament is the same as the Jewish Bible called the Tanakh. Scrolls and tablets provided the Jews with written records of their history over the centuries, composed by kings, shepherds, prophets, and other likely leaders. The first five books, the Torah, compiled in the early fourteen hundreds B.C. From that point on, over the next one thousand years, the Jewish people collected other scriptural texts. Councils of rabbis arranged the Jewish Scriptures and the Law at around four hundred fifty B.C. During this time, the books, or scriptures, were arranged by topic; for instance, the Law (Torah), the prophets (Nebiim), and the writings (Ketubim). The first letters of these Hebrew named sections, or T, N, and K, formed the name of the Hebrew Bible, the Tanakh. In two hundred fifty B.C., Jewish scholars translated the Hebrew Bible into Greek in Alexandria. Egypt. This translation became known as the “Septuagint,” meaning seventy. This text is so called Septuagint because it was seventy Jewish scholars commissioned during the reign of Ptolemy Philadelphus to initiate the mission to translate the Jewish scriptures. As for the New Testament, Paul became the alleged Mosses of his day. He wrote fourteen of the twenty-seven books, some of which he wrote directly to other church leaders. These included first and second Timothy, Titus, and Philemon. His other books, Romans, first and second Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, and first and second Thessalonians, were more generally addressed to communities and other Churches. Hebrews, however, has no identifiable author or addressee. Although, suspicion translates that the book of Hebrews was written by many Christian leaders and apostles and addressed to the world as a whole. Seven, of the twelve books remaining, touch briefly on theological and practical issues regarding the Christian life. Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John wrote the four gospels, which means “good news.” Mark’s gospel, the earliest of the four, was also the shortest and Matthew addressed his gospel mainly to the Jewish people or their background. Twenty to thirty years later, Luke wrote his gospel. His writings portray the only two-volume work in the whole New Testament, completed by Acts. Many refer to Matthew, Mark, and Luke’s gospels as “synoptic,” which means to look at in a general view of the whole. John’s gospel, however, is often noted as the most theological of the four. It was also John’s gospel that came last amongst the four. (“History of the Bible,” i.r.; Howard and Burge, pgs. 7-35; Renard, pgs. 127-128; Unger, pgs. 175-176.)

The Bible has been translated from its original languages, but it has not been changed, interpreted, or interpolated, which is to insert something unoriginal into a book or writing. Translations, such as The King James Version are derived from existing copies of ancient manuscripts: the Hebrew Masoretic Text (Old Testament) and the Greek Textus Receptus (New Testament). The three main lines of transmission trusted as accurate manuscripts are as follows: Masoretic Hebrew Text of the eighth and ninth century A.D., the most trusted, also of which may have been derived from Babylonian revision, the Greek Septuagint, which may have been derived from an Egyptian Hebrew revision, and lastly the Samaritan Pentateuch, which may have been derived from a Palestinian text. As for the Dead Sea Scrolls, they were discovered in Israel in the 1940’s and 50’s and provided evidence for the reliability of the ancient transmission of the Jewish Scriptures. As for the New Testament, of the 25,000 or so odd ancient manuscripts discovered so far, at least 5, 600 depict copies and fragments in the original Greek. Far surpassing the manuscript reliability of other ancient writings trusted as authentic every day, the Dead Sea scrolls tower above Julius Caesar’s The Gallic Wars, of which ten manuscripts remain, with the earliest one dating to one thousand years after the original autograph. The same applies for Pliny the Younger’s Natural History, of which seven manuscripts are seven hundred fifty years elapsed; Thucydides’ History in which eight manuscripts are one thousand three hundred years elapsed; Homer’s Iliad, the most renowned book of ancient Greece, is the second best-preserved literary work of all antiquity with one hundred forty-three copies of manuscript support discovered yet. In those copies, there are seven hundred sixty-four disputed lines of approximately fifteen thousand six hundred lines, five percent, as compared to forty lines in all of the New Testament manuscripts. Of William Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays, there are no surviving manuscripts, which were written in the sixteen hundreds. Scholars have been forced to fill in some of the gaps within Shakespeare’s plays making them imitative. In comparison, over five thousand six hundred copies and fragments of the New Testament in the original Greek give assurance that nothing has been lost. Of approximately twenty thousand lines that make up the New Testament, only forty are questioned. These forty lines represent one quarter of one percent of the entire text and do not in any way affect the teaching and doctrine of the New Testament. To insure that the scriptures, which were, in that time, copied by hand, did not possess any errors, the Jews had a system of scribes, who developed intricate and ritualistic methods for counting letters, words, and paragraphs. A single copy error would require the immediate destruction of the entire scroll. These scribes dedicated their whole life to preserving the scriptures. Jewish scribal tradition was kept until the invention of the printing press in the mid fourteen hundreds A.D. The Dead Sea Scrolls has confirmed the reliability of the scribal system over thousands of years. For thousands of years, Jews and, later Christians, have been persecuted for protecting the certainty of the scriptures. The apostle John, Paul, Luke, Mark, Matthew, and even with our more modern Christian leaders, such as Martin Luther have died to protect and preserve the ancient and holy texts that they not only lived for, but lived by. In the Christian age, being persecuted by the Romans, Christians came up with a secret password in order to decipher between friend or foe. They formed a sort of “graffiti” symbolizing safety. This renowned “graffiti” is better known today as the Christian fish. The reason for it being a fish is as follows: The Greek word for fish is ichthus, which is an acronym for the Greek phrase Iesous Christos Theou Huios Soter, which means “Jesus Christ, of God the, Savior.” (“Bible Manuscripts,” i.r.; “Bible Translations,” i.r.; Cornwell, i.r.; “History of the Bible,” i.r.)













(I wrote this.)

threebigrocks
Oct 7th 2008, 03:18 AM
I hate to ask this, but could you edit yet and make the formatting a bit easier to read? If you need help, let me know, it's very difficult to read as it is.

Emanate
Oct 7th 2008, 03:31 AM
I hate to ask this, but could you edit yet and make the formatting a bit easier to read? If you need help, let me know, it's very difficult to read as it is.


I am glad I am not the only one

amazzin
Oct 7th 2008, 03:50 AM
Where was this post copied from? Please be honest and do not attempt to lie

markedward
Oct 7th 2008, 04:41 AM
A Google search (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22people+have+passed+their+stories%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a) returns: nothing. (Except for this solitary page.)

Have you read this elsewhere? Or see something almost exactly like it? Otherwise... do you have a legitimate reason to suggest this was plagiarized?

ConservChrist
Oct 7th 2008, 06:14 AM
Okay um, as for the formatting, I have it formatted, but when posting, for some reason, it doesnt keep my formatting. Maybe someone knows how to fix that.

Also, I, Jimmy Wells, aka, ConservChrist, wrote this while in high school. It was a report I was to do on anything I wanted. So I chose to do it on the history of the Bible. Thank you. :-)

ConservChrist
Oct 7th 2008, 06:21 AM
OKay, well i attempted to edit it. It really failed so I separated the paragraphs at least. Nothing else I could find to do. Sorry.

Emanate
Oct 7th 2008, 11:57 AM
OKay, well i attempted to edit it. It really failed so I separated the paragraphs at least. Nothing else I could find to do. Sorry.


Oh no, that means we have to pay attention. :idea:

Dragonfighter1
Oct 7th 2008, 12:39 PM
Where was this post copied from? Please be honest and do not attempt to lie

Is this your normal way of communicating. Do not Lie?:rolleyes:

Dani H
Oct 7th 2008, 02:42 PM
It might have to do with your Internet settings. Do you see tags within your text before you post it? Can you not use the text editor provided?

I had this issue just yesterday and I had to go into Internet Explorer - Tools - Internet Options to tweak some things around in order to be able to use the text editor on these boards.

Just a thought ...

ConservChrist
Oct 7th 2008, 05:07 PM
I'll take a look at it all. So what do you folks think of the original thread?

amazzin
Oct 7th 2008, 07:57 PM
A Google search (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22people+have+passed+their+stories%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a) returns: nothing. (Except for this solitary page.)

Have you read this elsewhere? Or see something almost exactly like it? Otherwise... do you have a legitimate reason to suggest this was plagiarized?

I am n ot accountable to you Mark. Thank you. I have my reasons

amazzin
Oct 7th 2008, 08:06 PM
Is this your normal way of communicating. Do not Lie?:rolleyes:

It is when I see a sin being conceived and birthed !!! :P

ConservChrist
Oct 7th 2008, 09:14 PM
Well I'm not sinning with this. Haven't sinned with this. I did not copy this from anyone else. I have referrences, as any intellectual can clearly see. Try looking it up Amazzin. Thanks. ;-)

ANYWAY!!

Amazzin's false accusations aside, what does everyone else think of this thread? Think there could be any extra history added? I tried to cover as much as I could and keep it simple and within my assigned limits.
The Septuagint has a lot of history. I wish I could have added more about it BUT, if anyone is interested, I have a link for it:

http://www.septuagint.net

RoadWarrior
Oct 7th 2008, 09:22 PM
I'll take a look at it all. So what do you folks think of the original thread?

Some more paragraph separations would help! This is quite a lot of data. I see that you did footnote at least some of your references. Did you get a good grade on this project?

In fact, it reminds me a bit of something one of my grandsons did for a high school paper, but on a different subject. It is easy to pull a lot of information together these days from the internet, but this one is quite amazing!

What was your main source of knowing what and how to pull it together?

ConservChrist
Oct 7th 2008, 09:30 PM
Some more paragraph separations would help! This is quite a lot of data. I see that you did footnote at least some of your references. Did you get a good grade on this project?

In fact, it reminds me a bit of something one of my grandsons did for a high school paper, but on a different subject. It is easy to pull a lot of information together these days from the internet, but this one is quite amazing!

What was your main source of knowing what and how to pull it together?


I dont remember the exact grade, but it was in the high 90's. A+ either way.

The teacher gave the class the assignment and we could do it on anything was wanted.
It actually took me two weeks just to figure out what I wanted to do it on because I wanted it to be something that one: would give me enough to actually write a report on, represent me as a Christian, possibly be a witness to whoever, non Christian, that read it, and be informative to those who were Christians that did read it. Which is why I decided to post it here.