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danielh41
Nov 3rd 2008, 09:27 PM
I was reading Judges 11 today in my journey from Genesis to Revelation, and I was somewhat perplexed with Jephthah's vow to sacrifice what turned out to be his daughter. The Books of Law state that human sacrifice was an abomination to God, so why didn't God stop Jephthah from following through with fulfilling his vow? Come to think of it, why did God even accept Jephthah's irresponsible vow in the first place?

RJ Mac
Nov 4th 2008, 02:54 PM
It doesn't say God accepted the sacrifice, it only tells us the story of this
foolish man's rash vow. It does give us insight to the mentality of men
back then and how they viewed their word, the importance of doing what
was expected over the welfare of others.

I am thinking about the story of Lot and his daughters, how hospitality to
strangers took precedence over the safety and purity of his daughters.
How the Levites concubine was sacrificed to the wickedness of men.

Not saying it is right, only that these things happened and the lesson is don't
make vows just let your yes be yes and no be no everything else is from the
devil. Soon as you promise the kids something, obstacles fall before you.

I'm sure he sacrificed his daughter, what do we vow today, and are we good
to our word.
I promise God if you would let me get out of this jam I promise to be in
church every time the church meets. And our follow up was what?
Until the next jam we get in?

RJ

1of7000
Nov 4th 2008, 03:59 PM
another cultural misunderstanding. she was not sacrificed as in killed, cut up and burned. she was given to serve in the temple mopping floors, doing dishes,etc.
this was often done when no husband could be found for the daughter.

the reference to the burnt offering is that it was a daily offering that lasted all day just as service to God is to be daily lasting all day.

Levin
Nov 4th 2008, 07:28 PM
another cultural misunderstanding. she was not sacrificed as in killed, cut up and burned. she was given to serve in the temple mopping floors, doing dishes,etc.
this was often done when no husband could be found for the daughter.

the reference to the burnt offering is that it was a daily offering that lasted all day just as service to God is to be daily lasting all day.
Um, I think that this vow can be better understood in its cultural context. Jephthah's vow was a type of pagan vow used to invoke a deity and guarantee a victory. Given the nature of his vow, it was likely that his daughter or another family member would come out before any such family member would.

This vow is not only extremely foolish in nature, but in taking this vow Jephthah doubts that I AM can deliver him. The following paragraph demonstrates this.

In Jephthah's message to the King of Ammon he declares that I AM will decide the battle (11:27), then the text informs us that the Spirit of I AM was on Jephthah (11:29), and he followed this Spirit towards the Ammonites (11:29). It is at this point that Jephthah makes his tragic vow. The author has made it clear that Jephthah knows that I AM is on his side and therefore so is the victory. Rather than trusting I AM for this victory, Jephthah instead makes his vow, hoping to invoke his God to his aid. Jephthah's vow, more than just being tragic in itself, is illustrative of his inability to trust I AM. He does not think that God will do as He promised, but just like Gideon and the fleeces Jephthah decides to deal with I AM as if His word is not true and His covenant is not sure.

Also, due to the pagan nature of this vow, it seems clear that Jephthah's daughter was in fact burned. Her virginity is mourned because not only will she not have any heir (a massive deal in ancient Israel), but her father Jephthah will also have no heirs, because she is his only child.

With Regards,
Levin

danielh41
Nov 5th 2008, 03:54 PM
One of the things I noticed as I finished reading Judges is how imperfect the judges of Isreal were, including Gideon (asking God to prove Himself) and Samson (who was apparently ruled by his sexual desires to the point of telling Delilah the secret of his strength). I guess the point of the book is that God can use imperfect people to do His will. I guess that's good since we are all imperfect (I know I am).