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kenrank
Dec 18th 2008, 01:15 PM
On day one of creation, God created light. He divided darkness and light, he called the dark night, the light day.

However, it was not until the 4th day of creation that the physical lights which allow us to see were created. The sun which lights the day, the moon and stars to light the night, created on the 4th day. These lights too, define for us what day or night is.

What then, do you think the light on day one is? I have heard one who believes the elements that would be used to make the sun, moon, and stars were created on day one...thus, even though the sun and moon were yet to be created, what would be used to make them was, so God was able to divide day and night. This makes some sense.

I have another alternative to that which is worthy of consideration. It is a two part answer that works in harmony together.

Since God knows the end from the beginning and the beginning from the end, He knew before He made us, that we would fall. Could it be then, that the "light" on day one was the narrow pathway BACK to him, created before we even needed to use that path?

There is no record as to when God's Torah, His Law, was created. However, we know it was before Sinai and Moses, because we see that Abraham kept God's commandments and Torah as early as Gen 26:5. Could Torah, the guideline for what is and isn't expected of God's people, have been created on day one?

Pro 6:23 For the command is a lamp, And the Torah a light and reproofs of discipline a way of life

The word WORD is used for Torah at various times, and we know the Word was made flesh. When in the flesh, John refered to him in this manner:

John 1:4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.
John 1:5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

He goes on:

John 1:7 The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe.
John 1:8 He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light.
John 1:9 That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.

I am not proposing Yahushua (Jesus) was created, I rather see him as the creator. But his purpose in coming to earth was to reconcile the world unto himself, to "light the way" back to God.

So could it have been that the Torah, which pointed to Messiah, and the Good News (gospel) itself, was the light created on day one? A path back to God before the path was even needed? I draw no conclusion yet, ultimately we canot not know for sure. But if this is indeed what the light of day one is about, is there a better example of the grace of God in scripture than to see him planning our return to Him before we even fell away? I know not of one!

Peace and blessings.
Ken

Gregg
Dec 18th 2008, 02:31 PM
I don't know, but it made me think of this. Dark is the absense of light. Darkness is often associated with evil. Yet Darkness in itself is good. It is when we sleep. Why did God create us to need sleep. Is sleep symbolic of dying and waking up in Heaven? Is the first light the light that is found in Heaven? Is Heaven lit up by the holiness of Christ or God? Or is/was it created for us?

BroRog
Dec 18th 2008, 02:54 PM
On day one of creation, God created light. He divided darkness and light, he called the dark night, the light day.

However, it was not until the 4th day of creation that the physical lights which allow us to see were created. The sun which lights the day, the moon and stars to light the night, created on the 4th day. These lights too, define for us what day or night is.

What then, do you think the light on day one is? I have heard one who believes the elements that would be used to make the sun, moon, and stars were created on day one...thus, even though the sun and moon were yet to be created, what would be used to make them was, so God was able to divide day and night. This makes some sense.

I have another alternative to that which is worthy of consideration. It is a two part answer that works in harmony together.

Since God knows the end from the beginning and the beginning from the end, He knew before He made us, that we would fall. Could it be then, that the "light" on day one was the narrow pathway BACK to him, created before we even needed to use that path?

There is no record as to when God's Torah, His Law, was created. However, we know it was before Sinai and Moses, because we see that Abraham kept God's commandments and Torah as early as Gen 26:5. Could Torah, the guideline for what is and isn't expected of God's people, have been created on day one?

Pro 6:23 For the command is a lamp, And the Torah a light and reproofs of discipline a way of life

The word WORD is used for Torah at various times, and we know the Word was made flesh. When in the flesh, John refered to him in this manner:

John 1:4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.
John 1:5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

He goes on:

John 1:7 The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe.
John 1:8 He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light.
John 1:9 That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.

I am not proposing Yahushua (Jesus) was created, I rather see him as the creator. But his purpose in coming to earth was to reconcile the world unto himself, to "light the way" back to God.

So could it have been that the Torah, which pointed to Messiah, and the Good News (gospel) itself, was the light created on day one? A path back to God before the path was even needed? I draw no conclusion yet, ultimately we canot not know for sure. But if this is indeed what the light of day one is about, is there a better example of the grace of God in scripture than to see him planning our return to Him before we even fell away? I know not of one!

Peace and blessings.
Ken


Two things:

First, scientist are just now learning that all things are made up of "strings", which are, in essence a form of "light".

Second, we understand the separating of light from the darkness to have additional significance as this speaks to God's purpose for creation, i.e. to reveal himself. From day-one our understanding has moved from cloudy to clear, dim to bright, vague to defined, ambiguous to fixed, foolish to wise, dumb to smart, and etc.

kenrank
Dec 18th 2008, 03:04 PM
I don't know, but it made me think of this. Dark is the absense of light. Darkness is often associated with evil. Yet Darkness in itself is good. It is when we sleep. Why did God create us to need sleep. Is sleep symbolic of dying and waking up in Heaven? Is the first light the light that is found in Heaven? Is Heaven lit up by the holiness of Christ or God? Or is/was it created for us?

Like I said, I haven't made any conclusion. Don't even know if one is possible. But what you are saying somewhat falls in line with how I lean, that being...the good, the path to him, maybe even, knowledge.

The tree of knowledge of good and evil has both light (good) and dark (evil) and from what we can tell, was involved in the first command given by God. (i.e. don't eat of it)

Another perspective would be for those who do not believe Jesus is God, then they might see Jesus as having been created then...the light. I don't subscribe to that notion.

Good stuff though!
Peace.
Ken

Friend of I AM
Dec 18th 2008, 03:19 PM
God's plans in themselves were all available and known to him from the beginning. As the scriptures state..

Ecclesiastes 3:1
To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:

Ecclesiastes 3:11
It is beautiful how God has done everything at the right time. He has put a sense of eternity in people's minds. Yet, mortals still can't grasp what God is doing from the beginning to the end [of time].

So everything that God has done is meant to be applied to various periods of time when applied to his creations.

I don't believe God created the Mosaic covenant..for example -- to be applied to those during Noah's time..or after the time of Christ..as they are given no specific commands by God to follow the Mosaic covenants.

Hope this answers your question.

MacGyver
Dec 18th 2008, 03:46 PM
This is from Thomas Aquinas

Be light made: I answer, then, with Dionysius (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05013a.htm) (Div. Nom. iv), that the light was the sun's light, formless as yet, being already the solar substance (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14322c.htm), and possessing illuminative power in a general way, to which was afterwards added the special and determinative power required to produce determinate effects. Thus, then, in the production of this light a triple distinction was made between light and darkness. First, as to the cause (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03459a.htm), forasmuch as in the substance (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14322c.htm) of the sun we have the cause (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03459a.htm) of light, and in the opaque nature (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10715a.htm) of the earth the cause (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03459a.htm) of darkness. Secondly, as to place, for in one hemisphere there was light, in the other darkness. Thirdly, as to time; because there was light for one and darkness for another in the same hemisphere; and this is signified by the words, "He called the light day, and the darkness night."
Augustine (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02084a.htm) seems to say (De Civ. Dei xi, 9,33) that Moses (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10596a.htm) could not have fittingly passed over the production of the spiritual (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14220b.htm) creature, and therefore when we read, "In the beginning God (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06608a.htm)created (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04470a.htm) heaven and earth," a spiritual (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14220b.htm)nature (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10715a.htm) as yet formless is to be understood by the word "heaven," and formless matter (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10053b.htm) of the corporeal creature by the word "earth." And spiritual (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14220b.htm)nature (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10715a.htm) was formed first, as being of higher dignity than corporeal. The forming, therefore, of this spiritual (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14220b.htm)nature (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10715a.htm) is signified by the production of light, that is to say, of spiritual (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14220b.htm) light. For a spiritual (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14220b.htm)nature (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10715a.htm) receives its form (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06137b.htm) by the enlightenment whereby it is led to adhere to the Word of God (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09328a.htm).

BrckBrln
Dec 18th 2008, 03:50 PM
The light from day one came from the Sun. Genesis 1 is topical not chronological.

Friend of I AM
Dec 18th 2008, 04:30 PM
The light from day one came from the Sun. Genesis 1 is topical not chronological.

I think there's a metaphorical aspect to it.specifically..the light of Christ..think of Paul's Epistle from Hebrews..

John 1:4

"In him was life, and that life was the light of men."

Hebrews 2:18
Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.

So before him there was only darkness in creation..when he came, so did light "i.e. bright morning star." In relation to the thread poster's original question..I don't think the Torah can be discerned to be created at any period of time within God's creation of man..thus that is why I posted the verses from Ecclessiastes.

We only know it to be applicable to a specific time period to men..specifically that time period between when it was handed to Moses on Mount Sinai and the cross. Who knows exactly when God created it. It could have been created at any "time" within the realm we live in..which does not apply to the timelessness of God himself..i.e. him being eternity and all.

Just_Another_Guy
Dec 19th 2008, 12:10 AM
John 1:4

"In him was life, and that life was the light of men."

Hebrews 2:18
Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.

So before him there was only darkness in creation..

I don't agree in entirety -- As per this verse..

1 John 1:5 This then is the message which we have heard of him, and declare unto you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all.

So I think the light always existed. Now the darkness came afterward, or I think it came after God seperated the light from the darkness. We know that all darkness represents is the absence of light. That being said, I think we can look at the initial Genesis account from two perspectives..God seperating physical light from physical darkness..or from a metaphorical perspective of God seperating the concepts of good and evil from the onset of creation. Isaiah 45:7 goes into this a bit more in depth with the I form light I create darkness verses.

Friend of I AM
Dec 19th 2008, 12:18 AM
I don't agree in entirety -- As per this verse..

1 John 1:5 This then is the message which we have heard of him, and declare unto you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all.

So I think the light always existed. Now the darkness came afterward, or I think it came after God seperated the light from the darkness. We know that all darkness represents is the absence of light. That being said, I think we can look at the initial Genesis account from two perspectives..God seperating physical light from physical darkness..or from a metaphorical perspective of God seperating the concepts of good and evil from the onset of creation. Isaiah 45:7 goes into this a bit more in depth with the I form light I create darkness verses.

That's what I meant. I wasn't trying to state that God isn't in control of things and that he wasn't light..just that creation itself only new darkness before it knew God..i.e..the following verse..

John 3:19
And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.

Now are you trying to suggest that light and darkness have some fellowship with one another in the verse from Isaiah above? If this is the case..how does one really distinguish between the two concepts? My thought would be that there is no fellowship between the two..but God uses both of these concepts known by man for his purposes..I think that's what the verse is alluding too above. We don't understand these purposes at times..thus is why there is all the confusion when something we perceive as bad is happenning...

God bless,

Stephen

Just_Another_Guy
Dec 19th 2008, 12:24 AM
That's what I meant. I wasn't trying to state that God isn't in control of things and that he wasn't light..just that creation itself only new darkness before it knew God..i.e..the following verse..

John 3:19
And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.

Now are you trying to suggest that light and darkness have some fellowship with one another in the verse from Isaiah above? If this is the case..how does one really distinguish between the two concepts? My thought would be that there is no fellowship between the two..but God uses both of these concepts known by man for his purposes..I think that's what the verse is alluding too above. We don't understand these purposes at times..thus is why there is all the confusion when something we perceive as bad is happenning...

God bless,

Stephen

No I am not trying to suggest that light and darkness fellowship with one another. I am trying to suggest that God uses these concepts for his purposes -- as per the description I'm about to give in realtion to the thread topic.

The torah for example..represented a two fold purpose by God -- the apostle Paul goes into great detail to describe this. The light in the torah..demonstrated and represented God's righteousnous, while the darkness it brought about to mankind was the inherent sinfulness of man -- and his need of a savior.

The time period thing I agree with you on. It is impossible for us to really say at what point in eternity God actually created it -- as he is the Alpha and the Omega. It does more than likely only apply to a specific point in time in regards to mankind's timeline.

kenrank
Dec 19th 2008, 01:46 AM
The light from day one came from the Sun. Genesis 1 is topical not chronological.

You're entitled to that opinion, but how do you arrive at it? It clearly says the sun was created on day 4.

Thanks.
Ken

ross3421
Dec 19th 2008, 01:57 AM
Col 1:13 Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:

Col 1:15 Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature:

Col 1:16 For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:

So it appears that the light was his dear son, the word of God, the light of the world. Note God creates the heaven and earth, his son which was firstborn creates all that is IN heaven and IN earth from day 2-6.

Ge 1:1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

Ge 1:2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

Ge 1:3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

Ge 1:4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.


He will be the literal light of the world for ever....


Re 21:23 And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.

Brother Mark
Dec 19th 2008, 02:00 AM
Paul quoted Genesis 1 to the Corinthians when he said it was God who said "Let there be light" in our hearts. The whole chapter is also about the salvation of man and his sanctification.

Man's heart is without form and void. The Spirit of God hovers over the heart of the man. Then God says let there be light and it is good. The man is changed. Then God begins the process of separating the man and sanctifying him and making him fruitful. Each step is good. But when man is fully formed in the image of God, God calls this very good.

So not only is it a type of God showing that Jesus would come into the world without explanation and not be understood (i.e. light without a sun) so would light shine in the heart of man and man would be created in His image.

There is much more to Genesis than just creation.

kenrank
Dec 19th 2008, 02:02 AM
Col 1:13 Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:

Col 1:15 Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature:

Col 1:16 For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:

So it appears that the light was his dear son, the word of God, the light of the world. Note God creates the heaven and earth, his son which was firstborn creates all that is IN heaven and IN earth from day 2-6.

Ge 1:1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

Ge 1:2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

Ge 1:3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

Ge 1:4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.


He will be the literal light of the world for ever....


Re 21:23 And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.

That's a well thought out post, but you realize it put Messiah as created, and not the creator. Note your above verse, Col. 1:16, "for by him were ALL things created." That goes along with John, "he was in the world, the world was made by him, the world knew him not." God is a Spirit (John 4:24) who was manifested in the flesh. (1 Tim 3:16) So could it have been the physical image he would assume, the image he made Adam after, what would become the son....that Col. 1:15 is speaking of???

Peace.
Ken

BrckBrln
Dec 19th 2008, 02:51 AM
You're entitled to that opinion, but how do you arrive at it? It clearly says the sun was created on day 4.

Thanks.
Ken

Like I said, Genesis 1 is topical not chronological. Look at the parallels between days 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6.

RoadWarrior
Dec 19th 2008, 02:56 AM
For some answers, you have to read the last page of the book.

Rv 21:23-25
23 The city has no need for the sun or the moon to shine on it, because God’s Sh’khinah gives it light, and its lamp is the Lamb. 24 The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their splendor into it. 25 Its gates will never close, they stay open all day because night will not exist there,
Complete Jewish Bible

Rv 22:5
5 Night will no longer exist, so they will need neither the light of a lamp nor the light of the sun, because Adonai, God, will shine upon them. And they will reign as kings forever and ever.
Complete Jewish Bible

Romber
Dec 19th 2008, 03:12 AM
I believe that God was referring to himself in verse 3. He didn't create himself, but merely showed himself. This would be plausible as there are countless verses referring to God as light. Although, it could be possible that he called himself into existence in this verse. It sounds awkward, but God is in a realm we don't understand. The last part is just an suggestion.

Then in verse 14, God creates the specific lights that would lead his creation. Thus the "...to separate the day from the night, and let them serve as signs to mark seasons and days and years" This is also plausible as this separates the day and night for his creation, and give them orientation to the world.

I also notice that the sun and stars get a specific name "lights" in verse 14, but in verse 6 the light is just an ambiguous term used. In my opinion it is given as reference to show the reader a definable event so they can properly divide what happens each day instead of just saying stuff happened with no exact order. It seems to be a good step in Christian apologetics if the above scenario is in fact true.

Of course I am saying most of this stuff with a lack of any other real outside verses for reference(except to the ones referring to God as light). This is a very interesting topic and I will definitely look into it more.

BrckBrln
Dec 19th 2008, 03:20 AM
Then in verse 14, God creates the specific lights that would lead his creation. Thus the "...to separate the day from the night, and let them serve as signs to mark seasons and days and years" This is also plausible as this separates the day and night for his creation, and give them orientation to the world.

Day one also separates the light from darkness, day from night.

And God said, "Let there be light," and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. Genesis 1:3-5

If this 'light' is God then did He switch it off so there could be night for the first three 'days'? Just compare that to this:

And God said, "Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night. Genesis 1:14

chad
Dec 19th 2008, 03:39 AM
In Genesis 1:5, there is already a seperation of day (Light) and night(Darkness) on the first day?

Although we know that the universe is enormous, consisting of other galaxies and solar systems that have thier own suns.


Chad :confused



On day one of creation, God created light. He divided darkness and light, he called the dark night, the light day.

However, it was not until the 4th day of creation that the physical lights which allow us to see were created. The sun which lights the day, the moon and stars to light the night, created on the 4th day. These lights too, define for us what day or night is.

What then, do you think the light on day one is? I have heard one who believes the elements that would be used to make the sun, moon, and stars were created on day one...thus, even though the sun and moon were yet to be created, what would be used to make them was, so God was able to divide day and night. This makes some sense.

I have another alternative to that which is worthy of consideration. It is a two part answer that works in harmony together.

Since God knows the end from the beginning and the beginning from the end, He knew before He made us, that we would fall. Could it be then, that the "light" on day one was the narrow pathway BACK to him, created before we even needed to use that path?

There is no record as to when God's Torah, His Law, was created. However, we know it was before Sinai and Moses, because we see that Abraham kept God's commandments and Torah as early as Gen 26:5. Could Torah, the guideline for what is and isn't expected of God's people, have been created on day one?

Pro 6:23 For the command is a lamp, And the Torah a light and reproofs of discipline a way of life

The word WORD is used for Torah at various times, and we know the Word was made flesh. When in the flesh, John refered to him in this manner:

John 1:4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.
John 1:5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

He goes on:

John 1:7 The same came for a witness, to bear witness of the Light, that all men through him might believe.
John 1:8 He was not that Light, but was sent to bear witness of that Light.
John 1:9 That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.

I am not proposing Yahushua (Jesus) was created, I rather see him as the creator. But his purpose in coming to earth was to reconcile the world unto himself, to "light the way" back to God.

So could it have been that the Torah, which pointed to Messiah, and the Good News (gospel) itself, was the light created on day one? A path back to God before the path was even needed? I draw no conclusion yet, ultimately we canot not know for sure. But if this is indeed what the light of day one is about, is there a better example of the grace of God in scripture than to see him planning our return to Him before we even fell away? I know not of one!

Peace and blessings.
Ken

Romber
Dec 19th 2008, 11:52 AM
Day one also separates the light from darkness, day from night.

And God said, "Let there be light," and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. Genesis 1:3-5

If this 'light' is God then did He switch it off so there could be night for the first three 'days'? Just compare that to this:

And God said, "Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night. Genesis 1:14

Hmm, that's true. I also realized that God has always been eternal, so calling himself into existence couldn't really fly. Actually, he could be eternal that he has always existed, just not as a visible source.

One thing we can learn is that darkness and light have always existed. In the verse it says god separated the light and darkness.

daughter
Dec 19th 2008, 01:27 PM
Like I said, Genesis 1 is topical not chronological. Look at the parallels between days 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6.
The observation that there are parallels between the first half of creation and the second half is not proof that Genesis is topical. It's an observation that themes are repeated and expanded on.

The observation that my father was born with webbed toes does not mean that his mother was a seal, for example, or the observation that human hearts have similarity in structure with those of kangaroos does not mean that we are cousins to the friendly roo. It's just an observation of a similarity.

kenrank
Dec 19th 2008, 02:29 PM
In Genesis 1:5, there is already a seperation of day (Light) and night(Darkness) on the first day?

Although we know that the universe is enormous, consisting of other galaxies and solar systems that have thier own suns.


Chad :confused

I know Chad, but the substance that causes day (sun) and the night(lack of sun...but with moon and stars) was not created until the 4th day.

As I stated in my first post to start this thread...we "could" be talking about the elements used to create matter. Everything when broken down has strands of light...and since (or if) the elements to make the 4th day matter was created on day one...separating night from day is arguably logical. I don't subscribe to that notion though.

The Lamb was slain from the foundation of the world. Messiah himself called not just the Light, but that the light was the life of men. Since YHWH knew we would fall, and knowing the lamb was slain at the worlds foundation, at least in the mind of God, all I am saying is this is just as much a possibility. Ultimately we cannot know with doubt...so my conclusion such as it is, is no better or worse than yours.

Peace.
Ken

kenrank
Dec 19th 2008, 02:40 PM
Like I said, Genesis 1 is topical not chronological. Look at the parallels between days 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6.

Day 2 has the addition of the firmanent, which divides the water from the water. What are we talking about here? Are we talking continents here? I don't think we are at all.

Gen. 1:7 And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so.

This firmament is separating waters below, the sea (?) from the water "above the firmament." This is speaking about what many believe to be the water canopy which surrounded earth, which was let loose at Noah's flood. Whatever it is, it is not speaking about dry land, as dry land came on the next day, day 3....

Gen 2:9 And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so.

Now on the 5th day, God created the sea creatures, as well as creatures which would crawl out of the water onto land, as well as the fowl of the air. I don't see any correlation between this and day two.

On day 3, land and vegetation was ceated. On day 6, the roaming creatures and man. What is the correlation here, other than both days were land based?

Peace.
Ken

Ascender
Dec 19th 2008, 03:04 PM
Light is perhaps one of the most taken for granted and least understood physical properties of the universe we live in.

Light is visible and invisible. I can change energy states, pass through solid matter, exist in darkness, and slow down, speed up and freak scientist out of their logical expectations. It can be reflected, refracted, converted, projected, and transformed.

Scripture says that God is light and in Him there is no darkness at all.

What is cool is that light permeates the universe. Recent studies on certain forms of radiation illustrate that light exists even in caves even though it is not visible. Cerenkov radiation studies, studies of pulsars, quasars, super nova remnants, blazars and other oddities show the power of light across the spectrum from gamma rays to ultraviolet to visible light, light has properties we are just beginning to study.

Too often we limit our understanding of light to what is visible, we limit God the same way...