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Firefighter
Dec 23rd 2008, 04:29 PM
Gen 1:1-5 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

What was the light that God created? Think Hard...:lol:

MacGyver
Dec 23rd 2008, 05:47 PM
According to St. Augustine in the City of God it was the creation of the angels.

St. Dionysius says "the light was the sun's light, formless as yet, being already the solar substance, and possessing illuminative power in a general way, to which was afterwards added the special and determinative power required to produce determinate effects."

Tertullian says "And God said, Let there be light, and there was light." Genesis 1:3 Immediately there appears the Word, "that true light, which lights man on his coming into the world," John 1:9 and through Him also came light upon the world. From that moment God willed creation to be effected in the Word, Christ being present and ministering unto Him: and so God created. The Word also Himself assume His own form and glorious garb, His own sound and vocal utterance, when God says, "Let there be light." Genesis 1:3 This is the perfect nativity of the Word, when He proceeds forth from God. [Against Praxeas 7,12]

Friend of I AM
Dec 23rd 2008, 05:51 PM
Gen 1:1-5 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

What was the light that God created? Think Hard...:lol:

To him everything is light..as God is light and there is no darkness within him at all. So I don't think the light unto itself was created..I think that as the poster listed above, this is just a reference to God introducing his light into the world..Christ..

MacGyver
Dec 23rd 2008, 06:00 PM
To him everything is light..as God is light and there is no darkness within him at all. So I don't think the light unto itself was created..I think that as the poster listed above, this is just a reference to God introducing his light into the world..Christ..That is pretty much what Tertullian said in that quote above, I gave three different views above, I figure one of those might be close to what the OP has in mind.

Emanate
Dec 23rd 2008, 07:17 PM
Gen 1:1-5 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

What was the light that God created? Think Hard...:lol:


John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
2 The same was in the beginning with God.
3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.
4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.
5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.

crossnote
Dec 24th 2008, 02:58 AM
I'll go with Tertullian. It is a similarview I held before reading his quote. After all what was the first words spoken by God? "Let there be light" The very Light was the words emanating from His mouth. His Word and Light were simultaneous and inseparable.

The entrance of thy words giveth light; it giveth understanding unto the simple.
(Psa 119:130)

Firefighter
Dec 24th 2008, 04:30 PM
But His Word has always existed, and hence the light thereof... otherwise we lose one of Christ's attributes. Christ is His word. (I.E. - the word became flesh) I am sure that we don't want to say that Christ was a created being.

I don't buy into the chaotic light theory because God is a God of order.

Angels could be it, but there seems to be problems with that one too...

Gregg
Dec 24th 2008, 04:45 PM
Or it could be just good old fashioned light. Light not the sun or a star, just light. Darkness is the absence of light. Creating light seperates the darkness. Even scientists aren't really sure exactly what light is. But God knows he created it. I am going with light as something he wanted in that place and "time" so he created it. Light, another one of God's creations.

ross3421
Dec 24th 2008, 04:59 PM
I am sure that we don't want to say that Christ was a created being.

Col 1:15 Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature:

Col 1:16 For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth,

The lamb is the literal light of the word, and note light was not yet seen in the world but God. Before the son there needs to be a father. Though the father and the son are one it is possibile that the son was born out of the father after Ge 1,2 as seen in verse 3. Col 1:16 would seem to supports this.

Re 21:23 And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.

Ge 1:1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
Ge 1:2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.



But His Word has always existed, and hence the light thereof... otherwise we lose one of Christ's attributes. Christ is His word. (I.E. - the word became flesh)

John 1:1 does not contradict the above. We see the same, God and the word (son) were one but at a point the word (son) was born out and lightened the world.

Joh 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
Joh 1:2 The same was in the beginning with God.
Joh 1:3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.
Joh 1:4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.
Joh 1:5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.


Mark

reformedct
Dec 24th 2008, 05:08 PM
i know this may seem very difficult but pleas put on your spiritual revelation receptors or else your brain will explode from this powerful truth:


when God said let there be light,



he meant LIGHT:eek:

shocking i know!

BrckBrln
Dec 24th 2008, 05:52 PM
I personally think people try to make this harder than it really is. God created light on 'day one'. He didn't create Jesus, or reveal His light or the Angel's light, He simply created the light we see in the universe today. What is the source of this light? The same as it is today, the sun, moon, and stars (which were created on 'day four'). That's how I see it anyway.

Chimon
Dec 24th 2008, 06:14 PM
Gen 1:1-5 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

What was the light that God created? Think Hard...:lol:

Is it possible that Moses is being poetic here, and a literary/figurative analysis gives better credence to the genre than does a literal word for word analysis?

MacGyver
Dec 24th 2008, 06:44 PM
I believe that this is a passage that can have more than one interpretation such as a literal and a spiritual interpretation. So here are the one's that I favor.

As for the literal I like St. Augustine's interpretation that the creation of light on the first day was the creation of the angels, he explains it very well in the City of God. As for a spiritual interpretation of the creation of light I like Tertullian's interpretation of the Word.

Chimon
Dec 24th 2008, 06:50 PM
This is hard for me to accept, because under a historical-critical hermenuetic, any passage has only ONE meaning unless the genre specifically indicates otherwise.

MacGyver
Dec 24th 2008, 07:10 PM
This is hard for me to accept, because under a historical-critical hermenuetic, any passage has only ONE meaning unless the genre specifically indicates otherwise.It is quite easy for me to accept considering the NT authors interpreted the OT this way, even Jesus Himself, such Jonah in the belly of the whale and so on.

crossnote
Dec 25th 2008, 06:54 AM
This is hard for me to accept, because under a historical-critical hermenuetic, any passage has only ONE meaning unless the genre specifically indicates otherwise.

That's fine but I don't think Tertullian's is a spiritual interpretation as another poster stated. I think the whole creation came about by God speaking it into existence. Before creation there was void/darkness/emptinesss; when He speaks, His Word sheds light over the void/darkness/emptinesss.

MacGyver
Dec 25th 2008, 07:10 AM
That's fine but I don't think Tertullian's is a spiritual interpretation as another poster stated. I think the whole creation came about by God speaking it into existence. Before creation there was void/darkness/emptinesss; when He speaks, His Word sheds light over the void/darkness/emptinesss.I understand that you take that as the literal, I see it as the more deeper spiritual meaning behind it.

kenrank
Dec 25th 2008, 12:27 PM
But His Word has always existed, and hence the light thereof... otherwise we lose one of Christ's attributes. Christ is His word. (I.E. - the word became flesh) I am sure that we don't want to say that Christ was a created being.

I don't buy into the chaotic light theory because God is a God of order.

Angels could be it, but there seems to be problems with that one too...

BY quoting John, Emanate (though this might not be why HE quoted it) sheds light on an aspect of he that was called Light. While I do not see Yahshua as having been created, the purpose of him coming in the flesh was. Seeing God knew we would fall, God also knew we would need a pathway back to him. Messiah laid out that path...the Good News, the gospel, the path back to God. So the light on day one could be the way back to God set in place before we needed to use it. If true, God's first act was an act of grace!

Peace.
Ken

Psalms Fan
Dec 25th 2008, 03:01 PM
This is hard for me to accept, because under a historical-critical hermenuetic, any passage has only ONE meaning unless the genre specifically indicates otherwise.

But Christ is the interpretation of just about everything in the OT. He is hidden under every rock and behind every tree in the OT. All we have to do is read John's commentary on creation in the first chapter of his Gospel account to see Christ in Genesis 1.

I hold to the "literary framework" understanding of Genesis, so I tend not to read it too scientifically. But I do believe that the Israelites understood this to be light as we know it.

But we know Christ. We know that He is the light of the world. He is also the Word from the Father.

Notice that it doesn't say "let light be created". "Light, be". Christ is both the Word "Let there be light", as well as the light that came from the Word.

dljc
Dec 25th 2008, 03:25 PM
Here is something to consider.

Proverbs 6:23 For the commandment is a lamp; and the law is light; and reproofs of instruction are the way of life:

God created light on day one, but didn't put the laws of physics in place until day four. The universe we live in today is based on those laws, and His Law is our guiding light.

Spiritually speaking could it be that "Order" is the light?

Gregg
Dec 25th 2008, 06:52 PM
Or it could be just good old fashioned light. Light not the sun or a star, just light. Darkness is the absence of light. Creating light seperates the darkness. Even scientists aren't really sure exactly what light is. But God knows he created it. I am going with light as something he wanted in that place and "time" so he created it. Light, another one of God's creations.


I think this guy is on the right tra...wait thats me!:D

Really think about it; how magnificant is it to create the thing called light? He wouldn't need the stars, planets or suns. Just light!

crossnote
Dec 26th 2008, 07:30 AM
I think this guy is on the right tra...wait thats me!:D

Really think about it; how magnificant is it to create the thing called light? He wouldn't need the stars, planets or suns. Just light!

It seems God wouldn't need created light either. The (Let there be Light) light was for our (future) understanding. His Word gives light and understanding.

Athanasius
Dec 26th 2008, 07:42 AM
Gen 1:1-5 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

What was the light that God created? Think Hard...:lol:

This is awfully original of me. I tend to think the "light" in question (which we will put in quotations, but only this once) is what we call light.

Zack702
Dec 26th 2008, 11:35 AM
I agree mostly with Gregg, reformedct and BrckBrln.
I don't disagree with most of the spiritual interpretations said but rather take the litteral point of view here. Not because of the defintion that we give light but because of the definition that Genesis does.

Perhaps it was in fact what we refer to as electromagnetic radiation or rather the path that which light travels.

God bound these marvelous things in our world to be constant and they remain so perhaps because of what is refered to as light in Genesis.

Light and all radiations have to do with the mysterious movement of energy.

We refer to light as the wave lengths that we are able to see but you can be sure that the qualities of light go far beyond what we see and know.

And in my opinion the light refered to is not just what we see by but also the energy or song if you will which binds the solidity of elements.

The light sings and the elements harken and form there shape.
But it is the energy which God gave these that they exsist by.

neverleaveunorfors
Dec 27th 2008, 08:49 AM
John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
2 The same was in the beginning with God.
3 All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made.
4 In him was life; and the life was the light of men.
5 And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not.
No one has seen God at any time yes no one has seen God at any time , so just what did John mean, read the revelation John had , read !st :pp John I believe it sort of explains his Gospel

daughter
Dec 27th 2008, 10:32 AM
It was what scientists call the "Big Bang." Well, that's what I tell scientists anyway. One second after the first word was spoken it had travelled 180,000 miles in every direction, and it's still going. Scientists know that the nearest they can get to the beginning is heat, and light... they can't get further back than that.

Well of course they can't. You can't get back before God uttered light into being.

Chimon
Dec 28th 2008, 07:36 AM
It is quite easy for me to accept considering the NT authors interpreted the OT this way, even Jesus Himself, such Jonah in the belly of the whale and so on.

Jesus was using an analogy, which is quite different than what you are proposing.

Romber
Dec 28th 2008, 01:16 PM
I believe the light is Jesus being created into a physical form.

MacGyver
Dec 28th 2008, 05:05 PM
Jesus was using an analogy, which is quite different than what you are proposing.Even though analogy falls into the catergory of spiritual as one of the senses of Scripture as well as allegory, moral, and anagogical, Jesus was using Jonah as a prefigurement of His own death and resurrection. It was the sign of Jonah (Matt. 12:39).

But even at that, are you saying that the NT authors never interpreted the OT spiritually? Do we need to analize it? I can.