PDA

View Full Version : Biblical Application



timmyb
Jan 2nd 2009, 03:14 PM
2Ti 3:16 All Scripture is God-breathed, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness,
2Ti 3:17 that the man of God may be perfected, thoroughly furnished to every good work.

So when I read the Bible I don't look how it is to apply to my life here and now. Seeing how the Scriptures are perfect made by a perfect God my life must apply to the whole of the Scriptures.

When I read the Bible I place myself in everything. I read it as if God himself were speaking to me. That teaches me to read scripture at face value because I would have very little respect for someone who had to decipher what I told them because they don't know what is symbolic.

This verse is very helpful when I read the Bible it shows me that Scripture doesn't apply to me at all. God is perfect and it is I who must make the choice to apply myself to the scriptures.

What do you think?

Firstfruits
Jan 2nd 2009, 04:07 PM
2Ti 3:16 All Scripture is God-breathed, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness,
2Ti 3:17 that the man of God may be perfected, thoroughly furnished to every good work.

So when I read the Bible I don't look how it is to apply to my life here and now. Seeing how the Scriptures are perfect made by a perfect God my life must apply to the whole of the Scriptures.

When I read the Bible I place myself in everything. I read it as if God himself were speaking to me. That teaches me to read scripture at face value because I would have very little respect for someone who had to decipher what I told them because they don't know what is symbolic.

This verse is very helpful when I read the Bible it shows me that Scripture doesn't apply to me at all. God is perfect and it is I who must make the choice to apply myself to the scriptures.

What do you think?

Would that also apply to the Gospel knowing that not all that applied up to the death of Christ applies to us now?

Firstfruits

timmyb
Jan 2nd 2009, 04:18 PM
ok... i must clarify my speech...

to say it applies to me in the sense is that I can take my life as it is and somehow apply scripture to it thus making my life the foundation of my application to scripture thus making scripture applicable to me... when i say scripture doesn't apply to our lives i mean it is our lives that must change in saying that scripture is infallible...

in light of your statement those scriptures have absolutely no life application to my life whatsoever... If I live according to the system of the world and God's ways are so high above mine my life is irrelevant... it can change... as of now God and I are incompatible and he doesn't change whatsoever, so whatever he says cannot per se apply to my life in any way. It is my life that I must apply to him... the change or application must be on my part and not on the scripture

do I make any sense?

Diolectic
Jan 2nd 2009, 05:26 PM
What do you think?
One must use proper exegesis and correct hermeneutics is studying the Scriptures.
A verse out of context in isolation from it's co-text is a pretext.

One can make the Scriptures say anything without proper understanding of the part of Scripture that they use.

timmyb
Jan 2nd 2009, 05:34 PM
One must use proper exegesis and correct hermeneutics is studying the Scriptures.
A verse out of context in isolation from it's co-text is a pretext.

One can make the Scriptures say anything without proper understanding of the part of Scripture that they use.

in essence i can try to make scripture apply to me and my understanding instead of taking it at face value

Diolectic
Jan 2nd 2009, 08:42 PM
in essence i can try to make scripture apply to me and my understanding instead of taking it at face valueIf you mean "try" as making an effort, yes.
But the effort comes from proper exegesis and correct hermeneutics.

Face value: to accept something because of the way it first looks or seems, without thinking about what else it could mean.

At "face value" some misinterpret verses and by doing so, they malign the charactor of God.

Example:
Romans 9:13: even as it has been written, "I loved Jacob, and I hated Esau.
At face value, this vers looks like God actualy hates Esau as a person for no reason at all.
Especialy when you look at from verse 11.

However, that is not what it's saying at all.
When one put's this verse in context and use the co-texts, one finds the truth of what the verse is saying.

There are many examples where "face value" must not be used.

Firstfruits
Jan 3rd 2009, 02:16 PM
ok... i must clarify my speech...

to say it applies to me in the sense is that I can take my life as it is and somehow apply scripture to it thus making my life the foundation of my application to scripture thus making scripture applicable to me... when i say scripture doesn't apply to our lives i mean it is our lives that must change in saying that scripture is infallible...

in light of your statement those scriptures have absolutely no life application to my life whatsoever... If I live according to the system of the world and God's ways are so high above mine my life is irrelevant... it can change... as of now God and I are incompatible and he doesn't change whatsoever, so whatever he says cannot per se apply to my life in any way. It is my life that I must apply to him... the change or application must be on my part and not on the scripture

do I make any sense?

Sorry, I meant to say not all that apllied up until Christs death applies to us now, with regards to what Christ taught the Apostles and they in turn have given to us.

God bless You!

Firstfruits

markdrums
Jan 4th 2009, 12:04 AM
If you mean "try" as making an effort, yes.
But the effort comes from proper exegesis and correct hermeneutics.

Face value: to accept something because of the way it first looks or seems, without thinking about what else it could mean.

At "face value" some misinterpret verses and by doing so, they malign the charactor of God.

Example:
Romans 9:13: even as it has been written, "I loved Jacob, and I hated Esau.
At face value, this vers looks like God actualy hates Esau as a person for no reason at all.
Especialy when you look at from verse 11.

However, that is not what it's saying at all.
When one put's this verse in context and use the co-texts, one finds the truth of what the verse is saying.

There are many examples where "face value" must not be used.


I have to completely agree!
Proper exegesis is essential in truly understanding scripture, and it's INTENDED, ORIGINAL context.

That said, I think I know what timmyb was saying in the O.P.
(Let's see if I correctly read his comment...)

I know that sometimes people take scripture, or single passages & try to twist & mold it to fit their personal life; which is entirely missing the point, & not an accurate way to apply scripture to one's life.

So, rather than fitting scripture to FIT your life, you need to fit your life to scripture.
:) (I THINK that's what he was saying....)

Lastly, Diolectic gave a great answer concerning "face value", so I'll just refer to what he said.
;)

MacGyver
Jan 4th 2009, 03:06 AM
Diolectic is right on. And to expand on what all has been said, Scripture can be interpreted in more than one sense, as St. Gregory said, "Holy Scripture by the manner of its language transcends every science, because in one and the same sentence, while it describes a fact, it reveals a mystery."

The moral sense of Scripture is one of the spiritual senses. Though the literal sense is the sense that the author had in mind when he wrote it, which is the primary sense that should never be overlooked, but Sacred Scripture has many places in it that we can apply to our lives that was not originally meant to be directed to you or me specifically.

markdrums
Jan 4th 2009, 10:42 AM
Diolectic is right on. And to expand on what all has been said, Scripture can be interpreted in more than one sense, as St. Gregory said, "Holy Scripture by the manner of its language transcends every science, because in one and the same sentence, while it describes a fact, it reveals a mystery."

The moral sense of Scripture is one of the spiritual senses. Though the literal sense is the sense that the author had in mind when he wrote it, which is the primary sense that should never be overlooked, but Sacred Scripture has many places in it that we can apply to our lives that was not originally meant to be directed to you or me specifically.

Well, SOME scripture is meant Literally, and it's important to use caution and NOT literalize passages that aren't supposed to be taken in such manner.

;)

But that's a WHOLE NEW thread topic......

Firstfruits
Jan 4th 2009, 11:58 AM
Well, SOME scripture is meant Literally, and it's important to use caution and NOT literalize passages that aren't supposed to be taken in such manner.

;)

But that's a WHOLE NEW thread topic......

This is why I said that not everything in scripture apllies since the advent of Christ.

Firstfruits

MacGyver
Jan 4th 2009, 03:13 PM
Well, SOME scripture is meant Literally, and it's important to use caution and NOT literalize passages that aren't supposed to be taken in such manner.

;)

But that's a WHOLE NEW thread topic......Exactly, like you said it is another topic. But to clarify myself a little bit, the literal sense can be metaphorical language and even symbolic language to a degree. Sometimes symbolism is referrring to something literal without being allegorical. Not that I think others don't know that I am just saying that in order to point out that I was not trying to imply that we are suppose to take metaphors and symbols in a complete literal sense, it is easy to be misunderstood.

markdrums
Jan 4th 2009, 08:06 PM
Exactly, like you said it is another topic. But to clarify myself a little bit, the literal sense can be metaphorical language and even symbolic language to a degree. Sometimes symbolism is referrring to something literal without being allegorical. Not that I think others don't know that I am just saying that in order to point out that I was not trying to imply that we are suppose to take metaphors and symbols in a complete literal sense, it is easy to be misunderstood.

Gotcha!
That makes sense. I understand what you're saying now. :)

Good clarification!