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crystalbrite
Jan 24th 2009, 09:09 AM
The bible says cussing is bad? A lot of the time, in this day and age, cussing is a language thing intended to emphasize a point. What does the Word say? How are we as contemporary people supposed to go?

Denny606
Jan 24th 2009, 12:34 PM
The book says to live your life so the world can see His good works {through you} and glorify the Father.How are we to do this if we are using profanity and taking the Lords name in vain.In our age it seems commonplace to hear this type of language it comes from weak minded people who lack the intelligence or vocabulary to express themselves properly or from people trying to cover some inadequacy they have themselves and I think of it as another of Satans tactics to keep us from a closer walk with God.

th1bill
Jan 24th 2009, 02:50 PM
... As already pointed out, we are called to be a peculiar people. That, of course, means that we will be noticed and stand out from the rest of the world. We are never to blend in and if we also curse then we will look just like them and in truth, we will not have repented.
... Sin is what sends a man, any man, to Hell and the fact is that cursing is sin.

pc_benz
Jan 24th 2009, 03:40 PM
The bible says cussing is bad? A lot of the time, in this day and age, cussing is a language thing intended to emphasize a point. What does the Word say? How are we as contemporary people supposed to go?

Listen to Scripture:


Isaiah 6:5---“Woe is me!” I cried. “I am ruined! For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my eyes have seen the King, the Lord Almighty.”



James 1:26---“If anyone considers himself religious and yet does not keep a tight rein on his tongue, he deceives himself and his religion is worthless.”




Matthew 12:34---“For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks.”




Prov. 13:3--- “He who guards his lips guards his life, but he who speaks rashly will come to ruin.”




Ephesians 4:29---“Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”




Proverbs 18:21– "Death and life are in the power of the tongue, And those who love it will eat its fruit."





Proverbs 27:19 - "As in water face reflects face, So the heart of man reflects man.





Study James Chapter 3.

jrepp
Jan 24th 2009, 03:50 PM
Yea and if as "contemporary" people can ignore that, well we might as well ignore the ten also

Friend of I AM
Jan 24th 2009, 04:02 PM
The bible says cussing is bad? A lot of the time, in this day and age, cussing is a language thing intended to emphasize a point. What does the Word say? How are we as contemporary people supposed to go?

Since many on here have already given examples from the word, I'm going to give a practical application of how bad cussing is in the grand scheme of our walks. I often times think of the woman "Annie" in the movie misery, who was accustomed to using the words "dirty birdy" and "cock a tootie" in lieu of more commonly used offensive curse words in the English language.

We learn throughout the story that Annie is a little bit(actually a lot) disturbed, a murderer, and enjoyed torturing those people that she deems she loves due to some fantasy she has about a fictional romance she's created within her mind of how her world should be...specifically the author of the book that she loves.(played by James Kahn). Now James Kahn uses a whole slew of curse words at Annie while he's being tortured(by her), and we sympathize and find him to be the Hero of the story as oppossed to Annie.

My point is that words can hurt..but often times words aren't always representative of our true standing or character within God's eyes..and how righteous we are before him. So in my opinion..I think God looks at the overall character of a man or woman..as oppossed to looking at a few trivial words a person may spit out during difficult times within their walks.

watchinginawe
Jan 24th 2009, 05:48 PM
I'll add some also to the already good posts here. crystalbrite, I am writing this with the assumption that you might be talking about yourself. If you are asking as a proxy for someone else or just from a standpoint of learning, then don't take what I say personally but apply it just the same.

Here is a verse taken a little out of context, but one that I think is a proverb all unto itself:

I Corinthians 15:33 Be not deceived: evil communications corrupt good manners.

That is so true. The enemy can use our words against us but the Lord will convict us if we listen. :hmm: I can remember a specific incident many years ago where I was slowly baited into an arguement and I let a word (a whole sentence? a whole tirade?) fly that I shouldn't have used or knew from whence it came. Immediately my adversary (not just my human adversary either) remarked how they were so glad to see me use a "man's language". I was immediately convicted and knew my witness had been compromised deliberately. I searched myself hard then to see if what had come out of my mouth was what was in my heart. I repented of that incident and came to know that the outburst was what was in my flesh and could be provoked if I didn't let the heart have greater space. I still battle with this from time to time unto this day.

In any event, the evil communications were just prior to the corruption of my good manners. :blush:

So how do we clean up our mouth? First, the obvious: Separate ourselves from evil communications. We need to be careful about what we are talking about and with who we might be talking. This doesn't go for just cussing either but for the more subtle things like gossip and backbiting.

But even further than just the conversations we engage in, the Apostle Paul suggests us to recognize the battle and tells us how to fight it supernaturally:

II Corinthians 10:3 For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh:

4 (For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds; )

5 Casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ;

Verse 5 tells us how to clean up our mouth (and any other thing where the enemy attempts to gain a foothold). We bring the imaginations, the things contrary to the knowledge of God, and even the thoughts of such into the obedience of Christ. Our heart becomes the gate guarded by the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

I hope you will decide that our language is a part of our witness to the world. If you feel convicted about it then repent of your cussing and let God work on you (give you the weapons) in bringing your communications into obedience. You might already be convinced that you can't do it on your own, but that is how testimonies are made!

God Bless!

pc_benz
Jan 24th 2009, 06:28 PM
My point is that words can hurt..but often times words aren't always representative of our true standing or character within God's eyes..and how righteous we are before him. So in my opinion..I think God looks at the overall character of a man or woman..as oppossed to looking at a few trivial words a person may spit out during difficult times within their walks.

This is very true.

Bandit
Jan 24th 2009, 06:50 PM
How bad is cussing?


That depends upon how good you are at it.

Friend of I AM
Jan 25th 2009, 06:39 PM
Proverbs 27:6
Faithful are the wounds of a friend; but the kisses of an enemy are deceitful.

I often times think of how those in life who love us the most, are more than likely to tell us the truth about our situation, as oppossed to trying to sweeten everything up with nicey-nice words. We need to be careful and not get too caught up in the exact words the people say to us in our walks. Remember, the serpent beguiled Eve with sweet words, and his tactics haven't changed to this day.

I'm not advocating that we should go about cursing at each other when testifying, I am advocating individuals not to always discount testimony that isn't pleasing to the ears.

tt1106
Jan 25th 2009, 07:01 PM
Joshua 1:8
This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.

There might be a reason Joshua was blessed. ;)
If only I knew enough scripture that, whenever I opened my mouth, only what is of God would pour out.

Just_Another_Guy
Jan 27th 2009, 03:16 PM
Joshua 1:8
This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.

There might be a reason Joshua was blessed. ;)
If only I knew enough scripture that, whenever I opened my mouth, only what is of God would pour out.

The Pharisees knew a lot about scripture..and the love of God wasn't pouring out of their mouths. God looks at the intentions of the heart, not how articulate or how well versed an individual may be in scripture(Torah). We need to watch our words, but we also need to make sure that we are always saying things in the right spirit..as oppossed to making sure that everything sounds all nicey-nice to those whom we are preaching to.

Emanate
Jan 27th 2009, 05:03 PM
Listen to Scripture:


Isaiah 6:5---“Woe is me!” I cried. “I am ruined! For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my eyes have seen the King, the Lord Almighty.”



James 1:26---“If anyone considers himself religious and yet does not keep a tight rein on his tongue, he deceives himself and his religion is worthless.”




Matthew 12:34---“For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks.”




Prov. 13:3--- “He who guards his lips guards his life, but he who speaks rashly will come to ruin.”




Ephesians 4:29---“Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”




Proverbs 18:21– "Death and life are in the power of the tongue, And those who love it will eat its fruit."





Proverbs 27:19 - "As in water face reflects face, So the heart of man reflects man.





Study James Chapter 3.




None of these verses refer to cussing.

CommanderRobey
Jan 27th 2009, 06:35 PM
None of these verses refer to cussing.

Colossians 3:8 But now ye also put off all these; anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy communication out of your mouth.

Cussing certainly is filthy communication.

sheina maidle
Jan 27th 2009, 06:42 PM
Colossians 3:8 But now ye also put off all these; anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy communication out of your mouth.

Cussing certainly is filthy communication.
Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer. (Psalms 19:14)

Cussing is not acceptable in God's sight!

SnakeWesker
Jan 27th 2009, 10:04 PM
Not only does the Bible say that cussing is bad, but it also sounds stupid. It makes people sound unintelligent.

Emanate
Jan 27th 2009, 10:06 PM
Colossians 3:8 But now ye also put off all these; anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy communication out of your mouth.

Cussing certainly is filthy communication.


Would that not depend on the use?

I always wonder who decided what words were bad and created a list of words to not say.

CommanderRobey
Jan 27th 2009, 10:21 PM
Would that not depend on the use?

I always wonder who decided what words were bad and created a list of words to not say.

There are some words in the Word of God that one might use as cursewords; i.e., p*****h (1 Samuel 25:22), d****d (Mark 16:16) h**l *Mark 9:45. Some even use the names of the Father and the Son as cursewords.

I find it amazing that many who claim to be of Christ have no problem swearing and feel no remorse after the fact.

Cursing is a result of giving in to temptation and my Father has promised He would not allow so much burden on me that I would have no other choice but to give in to temptation (1 Corinthians 10:13).

We can control our tongue if first we submit to God before we speak.

Emanate
Jan 27th 2009, 10:57 PM
There are some words in the Word of God that one might use as cursewords; i.e., p*****h (1 Samuel 25:22), d****d (Mark 16:16) h**l *Mark 9:45. Some even use the names of the Father and the Son as cursewords.

I find it amazing that many who claim to be of Christ have no problem swearing and feel no remorse after the fact.

Cursing is a result of giving in to temptation and my Father has promised He would not allow so much burden on me that I would have no other choice but to give in to temptation (1 Corinthians 10:13).

We can control our tongue if first we submit to God before we speak.


Is there a difference in cussing and substituting a non cuss word for a cuss word?

CommanderRobey
Jan 27th 2009, 11:03 PM
No, whether one separates h**k for h**l, or some other word for a cussword, it is still cussing.

It all has to do with the intent of the heart.

Emanate
Jan 28th 2009, 04:48 PM
No, whether one separates h**k for h**l, or some other word for a cussword, it is still cussing.

It all has to do with the intent of the heart.


Yes, that is a valid statement. It is not the words that are bad, it is the intent or feelings behind them.

CommanderRobey
Jan 28th 2009, 04:54 PM
Yes, that is a valid statement. It is not the words that are bad, it is the intent or feelings behind them.
Some words are cusswords no matter the intent.

Just_Another_Guy
Jan 28th 2009, 05:52 PM
Some words are cusswords no matter the intent.

It really does depend a lot on context and language. Certain words in certain languages do have only negative connotations to them, and can be thought of only as curse words. This does not preclude God from searching one's heart though. I think of Eziekiel and Isiaiah, two notable prophets of the bible being not the most prestine and proper speakers, but we see that God approached both of these men as he saw their intentions..despite their words..were godly and useful when going about spreading his message.

navigator
Jan 28th 2009, 08:11 PM
God tells us not to be worldly. I would think cussing is being worldly. He tells us not to be a stumbling block and many find cussing to be offensive which would cause them to think less of you.

I would say though that cussing is not any worse than many other sins we commit every day that we deal with. For me it would be overeating(though I am doing good now) and speeding.

I think it is clear that we shouldn't do it. Now the key is trying hard with the Lord's help to stop.

sheina maidle
Jan 28th 2009, 08:27 PM
This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh. (Galatians 5:16)

Friend of I AM
Jan 28th 2009, 08:54 PM
God tells us not to be worldly. I would think cussing is being worldly. He tells us not to be a stumbling block and many find cussing to be offensive which would cause them to think less of you.

I would say though that cussing is not any worse than many other sins we commit every day that we deal with. For me it would be overeating(though I am doing good now) and speeding.

I think it is clear that we shouldn't do it. Now the key is trying hard with the Lord's help to stop.

You know it was intersting, Jesus was called a glutton by those whom he was surrounded by. I think a lot of what we deem as offensive at all times isn't inherently sinful. But we do need to be careful around those with weak consciences, so as we do not inadvertently cause them to stumble in their walk. Funny thing is though, I'd actually prefer someone to yell an expletive at me as I was getting ready to run off of a cliff, as oppossed to using gentle words with me. We're all different though, to each his(or her) own.

Grace,

Stephen

Emanate
Jan 28th 2009, 09:14 PM
You know it was intersting, Jesus was called a glutton by those whom he was surrounded by. I think a lot of what we deem as offensive at all times isn't inherently sinful. But we do need to be careful around those with weak consciences, so as we do not inadvertently cause them to stumble in their walk. Funny thing is though, I'd actually prefer someone to yell an expletive at me as I was getting ready to run off of a cliff, as oppossed to using gentle words with me. We're all different though, to each his(or her) own.

Grace,

Stephen


Dearest Stephen, would you be so kind as to stop quickly as to not hurt yourself by falling of the steep edge on that cliff?:rofl:

Partaker of Christ
Jan 28th 2009, 09:54 PM
God tells us not to be worldly. I would think cussing is being worldly. He tells us not to be a stumbling block and many find cussing to be offensive which would cause them to think less of you.


I know a lot of 'worldly' folk who do not cuss.

Does that mean I ought to cuss, because they don't?

CommanderRobey
Jan 28th 2009, 10:11 PM
You know it was intersting, Jesus was called a glutton by those whom he was surrounded by. I think a lot of what we deem as offensive at all times isn't inherently sinful. But we do need to be careful around those with weak consciences, so as we do not inadvertently cause them to stumble in their walk. Funny thing is though, I'd actually prefer someone to yell an expletive at me as I was getting ready to run off of a cliff, as oppossed to using gentle words with me. We're all different though, to each his(or her) own.

Grace,

Stephen
Cuss at someone falling off a cliff is not necessary when one can yell "LOOK OUT!!!!"

Friend of I AM
Jan 28th 2009, 10:46 PM
Cuss at someone falling off a cliff is not necessary when one can yell "LOOK OUT!!!!"

My point was and always has been that words themselves, despite their meanings and contexts within a language..don't always necessarily reflect the intentions of one's heart. Sometimes we find the right words to say in a given situation to help someone, sometimes we do not. Ideally we should strive to use whatever words will grab a persons intention the most, but this is not always the case.

Case in point. Have you seen the scared straight videos? I'm not saying that I like to hear everything these men say to young teens who are facing posssible jail time, as often times what they say is very graphic and includes many expletives and curse words. But in looking at the intentions of those who are helping them, we can see that what is said is meant to create an awe and shock value to keep these kids away from a difficult- rough lifestyle.

Everyone is different though, and we have to try our best to pattern our responses with what we know of a person, and what techniques will work with them. Some people may respond good to such tactics..others may not. Regardless of what technique we use..we can only hope and pray that God will examine the intentions of our hearts when attempting to help others.

CommanderRobey
Jan 28th 2009, 10:51 PM
The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

If one is 'of Christ' what kind of witness is cursing at someone under the guise of good intentions? Is it really edifying to curse?

Friend of I AM
Jan 28th 2009, 11:03 PM
The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

If one is 'of Christ' what kind of witness is cursing at someone under the guise of good intentions? Is it really edifying to curse?

No offense to you but I've always thought the above saying was a bit oxymoronic...seeing as how if one truly has intentions that are inspired by God(good)..then they can lead to nothing but good. Anyway, my point has been solely that words themselves are not always to be looked at as damning or unedifying, due to what connotation they have within a language. We obviously need to be careful with what we say, and around who we say it..but intentions do play a big part in what is being said..specifically if those intentions are motivated in helping and not trying to destroy another person.

Grace and peace.

Stephen

CommanderRobey
Jan 28th 2009, 11:16 PM
No offense to you but I've always thought the above saying was a bit oxymoronic...seeing as how if one truly has intentions that are inspired by God(good)..then they can lead to nothing but good. Anyway, my point has been solely that words themselves are not always to be looked at as damning or unedifying, due to what connotation they have within a language. We obviously need to be careful with what we say, and around who we say it..but intentions do play a big part in what is being said..specifically if those intentions are motivated in helping and not trying to destroy another person.

Grace and peace.

Stephen
Cursing with 'good intentions' is not inspired of God since He states that we are to put off filthy communication from our mouths.

Cursing with 'good intentions' is nothing but one's own works and not of God.

Friend of I AM
Jan 28th 2009, 11:24 PM
Cursing with 'good intentions' is not inspired of God since He states that we are to put off filthy communication from our mouths.

Cursing with 'good intentions' is nothing but one's own works and not of God.

If anything I stated was offensive during this testimony, I sincerely apologize. I never adovocated for one to curse with good intentions..just stated that soothing and pleasant words, are not always synonomous with one who is trying to help you. Remember the sweet words of the Pharisees..that lead Christ to his death. Those sweet words "good teacher" and "Rhabbi" weren't meant as to be respectful to him, they were said in a mocking, jeering, condescending manner. People are often deceived into doing wrong, by being given the implication that people "love them" and are trying to "help them." We need to be careful not to get caught up and words..and examine the truth in the message being spoken to us.

Grace,

Stephen

Just_Another_Guy
Jan 29th 2009, 02:27 PM
If anything I stated was offensive during this testimony, I sincerely apologize. I never adovocated for one to curse with good intentions..just stated that soothing and pleasant words, are not always synonomous with one who is trying to help you. Remember the sweet words of the Pharisees..that lead Christ to his death. Those sweet words "good teacher" and "Rhabbi" weren't meant as to be respectful to him, they were said in a mocking, jeering, condescending manner. People are often deceived into doing wrong, by being given the implication that people "love them" and are trying to "help them." We need to be careful not to get caught up and words..and examine the truth in the message being spoken to us.



Proverbs 17:10
A reproof entereth more into a wise man than an hundred stripes into a fool.

I don't think your testimony was offensive. Jesus himself often times used words and practices that were not traditionally deemed all that Godly in front of others in his testimonies(i.e. You must eat my flesh and drink my blood to live)

This doesn't necessarily mean that his words were vulgar or carried any less meaning though. We have to be careful when making the determination as to whether or not an individual's testimony is God inspired or not. God bless.

Friend of I AM
Jan 29th 2009, 02:45 PM
Proverbs 17:10
A reproof entereth more into a wise man than an hundred stripes into a fool.

I don't think your testimony was offensive. Jesus himself often times used words and practices that were not traditionally deemed all that Godly in front of others in his testimonies(i.e. You must eat my flesh and drink my blood to live)

This doesn't necessarily mean that his words were vulgar or carried any less meaning though. We have to be careful when making the determination as to whether or not an individual's testimony is God inspired or not. God bless.



Thanks. This is why I used the example of the movie misery in my previous testimony. We find often times that sociopathic people can be some of the nicest, friendliest, sociable people around..but with their lack of conscience their behavior usually degenerates into some of the most vilest horrible crimes imaginable. Words are important(to a limited degree) and we need to season our testimonies with the grace..but I don't think one should automatically discount good testimony from an individual simply due to the fact that they don't like hearing what was said.

threebigrocks
Jan 29th 2009, 03:52 PM
Honestly, how many of the cuss words we have, in the way we use them in our western culture, are simply a perversion of what originally was a good word? That perversion is what makes it filthy communication. We may have a word in our American culture that is okay, but in another it's a no no. Each culture has it's own perversions, and it's a perversion none the less.

ThuggishSplicer
Feb 28th 2009, 05:08 PM
The bible says cussing is bad? A lot of the time, in this day and age, cussing is a language thing intended to emphasize a point. What does the Word say? How are we as contemporary people supposed to go?

Cussing is as bad as you make it. As bad as others want it to be.
The thought of cussing to be bad or wrong is an illusion given by parasites.
Like I said, cussing is as bad as you want it to be.
If you want to subsidize the collective ignorance by damning those who cuss, you are no better than they are.

Metalwolf
Feb 28th 2009, 06:33 PM
One question I have is, how long does a cussword remain a cussword? The words that were offensive 400 years ago mostly aren't offensive today. And the words that are offensive today would not be such if they were said 400 years ago.

The replacement words for urine and the butt are now commonly used today seemingly without offense to the listeners. But the major cuss words starting with S and F still are offensive.

Have the former stopped being cusswords if they aren't used in a derogatory manner? :confused

threebigrocks
Feb 28th 2009, 06:35 PM
Rule of thumb for me - is the replacement word a perversion of the original meaning? ;)

Ixthus
Feb 28th 2009, 07:00 PM
Cussing is as bad as any other sin.

reformedct
Mar 9th 2009, 06:53 PM
i think the issue is what is cussing? is there a set amount of words? no, i believe it is the issue of the heart. many people think calling something crap is unwholeeome, yet paul says: i count it all excrement for the sake of knowing Christ. The Bible says our righteousness is as a filthy rag(menstrual)

God says: I am going to spread dung across your face. we know God is holy and perfect. So it is a matter of what is appropriate and inapropriate imo. i dont think the D-word is always sinful but that is my perspective.


if i walked up to someone and said "you deserve to have God smear dung across your face", some would view that as sinful, yet that is exactly what God told Malachi to say. the Bible also calls people whores and prostitutes. i think there is a difference between pointed strong language and unwholesome talk.

Elijah mocked other peoples gods, religion, and worship. God did not rebuke him for it. God also mocks those who worship false gods. There is a righteous way to use strong language and mock others, because God does and He is rightoeous. there is a right way to call someone a whore.

Scruffy Kid
Mar 9th 2009, 07:35 PM
The Bible tells us to bless others -- even our enemies -- to do good and to pray for those who hurt us, let alone those we just don't happen to like. That's not to deny that there might, sometime, arise an occasion for rebuke -- even strong rebuke -- as reformedct has just argued. But that doesn't negate the strong imperative of the gospel to love not just our friends, but also strangers and indeed our enemies, just as God loves us despite all our sins, and sent Christ to die for us while we were yet His enemies.

The opposite of blessing is cursing. In many languages the word for blessing derives from a form meaning speaking well of others, both in the sense of finding nice things to say, and in the sense of hoping for, or invoking upon them, good things. Cursing is speaking ill of others, or hoping for their ruin. "Cursing" of course is the root from which we get "cussing."

So when the Bible tells us to avoid nasty speech, I don't think that it's primary emphasis is upon "cuss words." I think the primary emphasis is upon avoiding speech which tears others down rather than building them up, speech that humiliates or demeans people in the eyes of others, rather than speech which makes every effort to treat others with respect -- as we ourselves would like to be treated.

The particular vocabulary elements that we consider "swear words" or "bad words" or "cuss words" are not so great to use -- although the one that I think is most bothersome is taking Christ's name, or God's, as a word of common exclamation. They can degrade conversation a bit. They violate the conventions of propriety -- and rightly so, in many cases. They can easily establish an unwholesome atmosphere.

But what really makes conversation a sewer, I think, is when we spread rumors, particularly malicious ones, exaggerate the faults of those we disagree with, show disrespect (especially for people unpopular, or unpopular with those before whom we tear them down). This is what is really unwholesome, degrading to speaker and listener and person spoken of, and obnoxious before God who loves all.

We should be careful not to strain out a gnat and swallow a camel.

The real need is to avoid speech that harms and demeans other people. This is what James emphasizes, for instance.

Jemand
Mar 9th 2009, 07:57 PM
Matt. 12: 34. "You brood of vipers, how can you, being evil, speak what is good? For the mouth speaks out of that which fills the heart.
35. "The good man brings out of his good treasure what is good; and the evil man brings out of his evil treasure what is evil.
36. "But I tell you that every careless word that people speak, they shall give an accounting for it in the day of judgment.
37. "For by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned." (NASB, 1995)

Eph. 4:29. Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, so that it will give grace to those who hear. (NASB, 1995)

Eph. 5:4. and there must be no filthiness and silly talk, or coarse jesting, which are not fitting, but rather giving of thanks. (NASB, 1995)

Colossians 3:8 But now you must get rid of all such things--anger, wrath, malice, slander, and abusive {Or [filthy]} language from your mouth. (NRSV)

I believe that these passages from the New Testament indicate that it is sinful to use both the words that are generally considered to be swear or cuss words, and also the euphemisms of them, such as darn, goldarn, doggone, jiminy, gosh, golly, gee, gee-whiz, holy gee, son-of-a-gun, gee-whiz, gosh, by gosh, etc. Not only are these words and expressions (especially when used as explicative) offensive to people who belong to polite society, they are also evidence of an inadequate vocabulary and a poor education—none of which bring glory to God or edify others.

Friend of I AM
Mar 9th 2009, 08:14 PM
Matt. 12: 34. "You brood of vipers, how can you, being evil, speak what is good? For the mouth speaks out of that which fills the heart.
35. "The good man brings out of his good treasure what is good; and the evil man brings out of his evil treasure what is evil.
36. "But I tell you that every careless word that people speak, they shall give an accounting for it in the day of judgment.
37. "For by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned." (NASB, 1995)

Eph. 4:29. Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, so that it will give grace to those who hear. (NASB, 1995)

Eph. 5:4. and there must be no filthiness and silly talk, or coarse jesting, which are not fitting, but rather giving of thanks. (NASB, 1995)

Colossians 3:8 But now you must get rid of all such things--anger, wrath, malice, slander, and abusive {Or [filthy]} language from your mouth. (NRSV)

I believe that these passages from the New Testament indicate that it is sinful to use both the words that are generally considered to be swear or cuss words, and also the euphemisms of them, such as darn, goldarn, doggone, jiminy, gosh, golly, gee, gee-whiz, holy gee, son-of-a-gun, gee-whiz, gosh, by gosh, etc. Not only are these words and expressions (especially when used as explicative) offensive to people who belong to polite society, they are also evidence of an inadequate vocabulary and a poor education—none of which bring glory to God or edify others.


Do the gestures that Paul mentions above include those who purposely try to fault find, and destroy other members in the body. He actually goes on himself to describe many members who are cretins, and even goes as far as describing a cretin prophet..who described others as lazy gluttons..liars. Paul used what many would consider strong offensive language in his Epistle to Titus explaining this..and instructed Timothy to stay away from people who bread such division, as well as attempt to destroy the body by creating such division. I think Paul would have used strong words by Today's standards to describe such men..who try to purposely lead others astray from the truth. God bless.

Jemand
Mar 9th 2009, 08:55 PM
Do the gestures that Paul mentions above include those who purposely try to fault find, and destroy other members in the body. He actually goes on himself to describe many members who are cretins, and even goes as far as describing a cretin prophet..who described others as lazy gluttons..liars. Paul used what many would consider strong offensive language in his Epistle to Titus explaining this..and instructed Timothy to stay away from people who bread such division, as well as attempt to destroy the body by creating such division. I think Paul would have used strong words by Today's standards to describe such men..who try to purposely lead others astray from the truth. God bless.
I, too, sometimes use strong language, even very strong language—but I never degrade myself or my Savior by resorting to profanity or euphemisms for profanity; and I always strive to be pleasing to God in every word and expression that I use.

Big Jake
Mar 9th 2009, 09:06 PM
Do the gestures that Paul mentions above include those who purposely try to fault find, and destroy other members in the body. He actually goes on himself to describe many members who are cretins, and even goes as far as describing a cretin prophet..who described others as lazy gluttons..liars. Paul used what many would consider strong offensive language in his Epistle to Titus explaining this..and instructed Timothy to stay away from people who bread such division, as well as attempt to destroy the body by creating such division. I think Paul would have used strong words by Today's standards to describe such men..who try to purposely lead others astray from the truth. God bless.

It is always good to look at one's own self before we start making assumptions about what others say in do. Paul also says "test yourself." Make sure that you are of the faith. We need to pray that we can test ourselves with God's spirit, so that we know what our true motivations and intentions are when going about doing everything in this walk. Profanity is not really the recommended form of encouraging people in the word or in everyday life...so we need to make sure that we encourage people much within the body in the most graceful way we can..particularly in this day and age. So despite our intentions, we do sometimes need to be careful with our words, particularly to those with weak consciences who can be easily lead astray. God bless.

reformedct
Mar 9th 2009, 09:06 PM
The Bible tells us to bless others -- even our enemies -- to do good and to pray for those who hurt us, let alone those we just don't happen to like. That's not to deny that there might, sometime, arise an occasion for rebuke -- even strong rebuke -- as reformedct has just argued. But that doesn't negate the strong imperative of the gospel to love not just our friends, but also strangers and indeed our enemies, just as God loves us despite all our sins, and sent Christ to die for us while we were yet His enemies.

The opposite of blessing is cursing. In many languages the word for blessing derives from a form meaning speaking well of others, both in the sense of finding nice things to say, and in the sense of hoping for, or invoking upon them, good things. Cursing is speaking ill of others, or hoping for their ruin. "Cursing" of course is the root from which we get "cussing."

So when the Bible tells us to avoid nasty speech, I don't think that it's primary emphasis is upon "cuss words." I think the primary emphasis is upon avoiding speech which tears others down rather than building them up, speech that humiliates or demeans people in the eyes of others, rather than speech which makes every effort to treat others with respect -- as we ourselves would like to be treated.

The particular vocabulary elements that we consider "swear words" or "bad words" or "cuss words" are not so great to use -- although the one that I think is most bothersome is taking Christ's name, or God's, as a word of common exclamation. They can degrade conversation a bit. They violate the conventions of propriety -- and rightly so, in many cases. They can easily establish an unwholesome atmosphere.

But what really makes conversation a sewer, I think, is when we spread rumors, particularly malicious ones, exaggerate the faults of those we disagree with, show disrespect (especially for people unpopular, or unpopular with those before whom we tear them down). This is what is really unwholesome, degrading to speaker and listener and person spoken of, and obnoxious before God who loves all.

We should be careful not to strain out a gnat and swallow a camel.

The real need is to avoid speech that harms and demeans other people. This is what James emphasizes, for instance.

hypothetically speaking
if i called someone an adulterous whore would i be demeaning them?

bagofseed
Mar 9th 2009, 09:11 PM
Speak the truth in season and out.
Just make sure you have love in your heart as a motive.
Don't know if the love always has to be for them.

Big Jake
Mar 9th 2009, 09:34 PM
hypothetically speaking
if i called someone an adulterous whore would i be demeaning them?

It depends on your motivations, your intent, and if what you were saying was true. If what you are saying is false, or if you have commited any type of similar sin yourself, then I think you may want to think twice about what comes out of your mouth.

reformedct
Mar 9th 2009, 09:37 PM
It depends on your motivations, your intent, and if what you were saying was true. If what you are saying is false, or if you have commited any type of similar sin yourself, then I think you may want to think twice about what you comes out of your mouth.

i was just trying to give an example of how strong language is not always sinful. God told some of His priests he was gonna smear crap across their faces. sounds pretty gross but God is perfect. therefore its not always a sin to use strong language or even gross (poopy) language. it is a matter of the heart

Big Jake
Mar 9th 2009, 09:43 PM
i was just trying to give an example of how strong language is not always sinful. God told some of His priests he was gonna smear crap across their faces. sounds pretty gross but God is perfect. therefore its not always a sin to use strong language or even gross (poopy) language. it is a matter of the heart

Oh I understand..but it's necessary to make sure that what we are stating is true before we stone someone. If we are lying, then how much harder can we expect God to come down on us? Also remember that the spiritual man judges everything, but he himself is subject to no one's judgement. If we are truly walking in the spirit of love when correcting..then what we say..regardless of how harsh it may seem..will hopefully bring about a positive change in the individual we are trying to help. God bless.

Scruffy Kid
Mar 10th 2009, 12:35 AM
The Bible tells us to bless others -- even our enemies -- to do good and to pray for those who hurt us, let alone those we just don't happen to like. That's not to deny that there might, sometime, arise an occasion for rebuke -- even strong rebuke -- as reformedct has just argued. But that doesn't negate the strong imperative of the gospel to love not just our friends, but also strangers and indeed our enemies, just as God loves us despite all our sins, and sent Christ to die for us while we were yet His enemies.

The opposite of blessing is cursing. In many languages the word for blessing derives from a form meaning speaking well of others, both in the sense of finding nice things to say, and in the sense of hoping for, or invoking upon them, good things. Cursing is speaking ill of others, or hoping for their ruin. "Cursing" of course is the root from which we get "cussing."

So when the Bible tells us to avoid nasty speech, I don't think that it's primary emphasis is upon "cuss words." I think the primary emphasis is upon avoiding speech which tears others down rather than building them up, speech that humiliates or demeans people in the eyes of others, rather than speech which makes every effort to treat others with respect -- as we ourselves would like to be treated.

The particular vocabulary elements that we consider "swear words" or "bad words" or "cuss words" are not so great to use -- although the one that I think is most bothersome is taking Christ's name, or God's, as a word of common exclamation. They can degrade conversation a bit. They violate the conventions of propriety -- and rightly so, in many cases. They can easily establish an unwholesome atmosphere.

But what really makes conversation a sewer, I think, is when we spread rumors, particularly malicious ones, exaggerate the faults of those we disagree with, show disrespect (especially for people unpopular, or unpopular with those before whom we tear them down). This is what is really unwholesome, degrading to speaker and listener and person spoken of, and obnoxious before God who loves all.

We should be careful not to strain out a gnat and swallow a camel.

The real need is to avoid speech that harms and demeans other people. This is what James emphasizes, for instance.hypothetically speaking
if i called someone an adulterous whore would i be demeaning them?I really am not quite sure what your point here is, reformedct.

My point was that while exclaiming "Oh sh**!" when you've made a mistake, or even "G** d**n it" when you hit your thumb with a hammer, or casually saying "WTF?" is perhaps not the ideal way to talk, that from a Biblical point of view it's far worse to fall in with talk which scorns some young person who doesn't fit in with the crowd, causing them to feel mocked and excluded, to spread rumors about what Mrs. Jones may or may not be doing, or to exacerbate hatred and distrust between different points of view, for instance between people who voted for X and those who voted for Y, or speak in bitterness and derogatorily of those who have, in some way, offended one.

Generally, I think we should avoid using crude, rude, or harsh language, or making jokes whose punchlines are unedifying references to sex, and the like. But for Christians to make a huge deal about minor infractions in this regard, especially while going around tearing others down or having an angry denunciatory demeanor, or being willing to assume the worst of others, is apt to cause others to feel we are hypocrites, with odd and irrelevant standards concerning right and wrong, an impression that many have of the Christian community anyhow.

I'm not quite sure what the point of your question to me was. I guess, but may be wrong, that you wish to point out that sometimes God, or God's prophets, used such terms to denounce Israel's descent into idolatry or similar great wrongs.

I tried to indicate, in my post, that I was not disagreeing with your previous post, in which you noted that on certain occasions, the prophets, or Christ, strongly denounced those who were in some very important way oppressing people, or distorting the truth. Thus, in a modern context, it would be natural, and not particularly wrong, for someone to have denounced in extreme terms what Hitler was doing, or what Stalin did, in torturing and executing their enemies and in creating a powerful and evil state machinery based upon such crimes. Under some limited circumstances it may be appropriate to talk that way about people who purport to speak for the Church, yet are undermining the faith in basic ways, such as denying Christ's resurrection, and so on. But I think we need to be rather circumspect about when we talk that way. In any case, that whole issue was neither the point I was addressing nor the one that the OP and the thread had as their concern.

But in general the Bible strongly indicates that it is our tendency to go around speaking ill of others, or giving angry denunciations, or using harsh and derogatory language of others, and that this kind of behavior is generally not what God wants of us. Jesus walked on water, but it's not my part to lead a boy scout troup into a position where, if they can't, they sink and may drown. Jesus on occasion used strong language of those whom He knew were centrally opposing God's plan. That does not mean that I have equal authority and discernment, or that the issues I champion are as important as those He championed. It's all too easy to see oneself, often, as God's spokesman, entitled to go about denouncing those with whom one has differences which, though perhaps quite important, do not rise to the level of people trying to kill Jesus.

The Bible again and again tells us to speak graciously of others, not to let wrath or contempt reign in our thinking, to turn away wrath with a soft answer, to be at peace with others in so far as it lies in us, and so on. Peter, in telling us to be always ready to give a reason for
the hope that is in us cautions us to do so with gentleness and respect. Jesus tells us to turn the other cheek. Jude, in telling us to contend eagerly for the faith once given to the saints, cautions us that the archangel Michael, contending with Satan for the body of Moses, "did not presume to use reviling language against him" but rather simply said "May the Lord rebuke you."

However, it's very common for Christians, in arguing with one another, or with non-believers, or speaking of those of whom we disagree, or even in family squabbles, or in gossip about our neighbors, to use language which tears others down, either in anger, or for other reasons. The Bible clearly teaches us not to do that.

It's conduct like that that constitutes what James calls using the tongue to bless God but curse men, like a fountain supposed to give out pure water which also gives out poisoned water.

That, IMO, is what the Bible principally forbids when it tells us not to let corrupt, filthy, or wrong language proceed from our mouths. This kind of thing does huge harm to those we traduce, to ourselves, to our listeners, and to the reputation of the Christian community and of Christ.

Just_Another_Guy
Mar 14th 2009, 07:00 PM
I, too, sometimes use strong language, even very strong language—but I never degrade myself or my Savior by resorting to profanity or euphemisms for profanity; and I always strive to be pleasing to God in every word and expression that I use.

What's the difference between strong language and evil actions though? What if an individual uses strong language..but their intentions and actions are good, while someone uses very kind and jovial language..and their intentions towards another are nothing but pure evil. Don't get me wrong, I don't like people to curse at me...nor do I condone one going out on a limb to curse at others whom they are trying to help, but sometimes we need to think outside of the box of what we've learned..particularly in the event that we may be travelling down a difficult and convoluted path.

I think of the many times in my younger years..when I wish I would have had someone use "strong language" with me, as oppossed to letting me go in a direction that would lead me astray. Whatever the case, sometimes the methods used may not be conventional..but it's God who looks at the heart of an individual and whatever situation they are in. Words carry no more value than what we as people give them...so I really do think intent..should be the most prevelant factor in when we here something we often times don't like hearing. I think of how many times there are so many people in this life who's words were ever so sweet, who have mislead me in the wrong direction.

MacBheathain
Mar 14th 2009, 07:10 PM
Matthew 15:11 (New American Standard Bible)
11 "It is not what enters into the mouth that defiles the man, but what proceeds out of the mouth, this defiles the man."

Just_Another_Guy
Mar 14th 2009, 07:15 PM
Matthew 15:11 (New American Standard Bible)
11 "It is not what enters into the mouth that defiles the man, but what proceeds out of the mouth, this defiles the man."

Remember this verse...

Wounds from a friend can be trusted..While an enemy multiplies kisses..

Again I don't want to sound like I'm recommending chewing someone out and cursing them out everyday..sometimes yelling at people and saying things they don't like to here is indeed necessary to get people's attention. I'd rather have the wounds..as oppossed to the deceitful kisses.

threebigrocks
Mar 14th 2009, 10:32 PM
Psalm 109
(Bold mine)
16Because he did not remember to show lovingkindness,
But persecuted the afflicted and needy man,
And the despondent in heart, to put them to death.
17He also loved cursing, so it came to him;
And he did not delight in blessing, so it was far from him.
18But he clothed himself with cursing as with his garment,
And it entered into his body like water
And like oil into his bones.
19Let it be to him as a garment with which he covers himself,
And for a belt with which he constantly girds himself.
20Let this be the reward of my accusers from the LORD,
And of those who speak evil against my soul.
21But You, O GOD, the Lord, deal kindly with me for Your name's sake;
Because Your lovingkindness is good, deliver me;
22For I am afflicted and needy,
And my heart is wounded within me.
23I am passing like a shadow when it lengthens;
I am shaken off like the locust.
24My knees are weak from fasting,
And my flesh has grown lean, without fatness.
25I also have become a reproach to them;
When they see me, they wag their head.
26Help me, O LORD my God;
Save me according to Your lovingkindness.
27And let them know that this is Your hand;
You, LORD, have done it.
28Let them curse, but You bless;
When they arise, they shall be ashamed,
But Your servant shall be glad.
29Let my accusers be clothed with dishonor,
And let them cover themselves with their own shame as with a robe.
30With my mouth I will give thanks abundantly to the LORD;
And in the midst of many I will praise Him.
31For He stands at the right hand of the needy,
To save him from those who judge his soul.

MacBheathain
Mar 15th 2009, 04:35 AM
Again I don't want to sound like I'm recommending chewing someone out and cursing them out everyday..sometimes yelling at people and saying things they don't like to here is indeed necessary to get people's attention. I'd rather have the wounds..as oppossed to the deceitful kisses.

It is possible to do everything that you mentioned without using profanity. I do it every day. However, If you want to tell the world that you are NOT a Christian, then swearing is the way to do it.

Matthew 26 (American Standard Version)
69 Now Peter was sitting without in the court: and a maid came unto him, saying, Thou also wast with Jesus the Galilaean.
70 But he denied before them all, saying, I know not what thou sayest.
71 And when he was gone out into the porch, another maid saw him, and saith unto them that were there, This man also was with Jesus of Nazareth.
72 And again he denied with an oath, I know not the man.
73 And after a little while they that stood by came and said to Peter, Of a truth thou also art one of them; for thy speech maketh thee known.
74 Then began he to curse and to swear, I know not the man. And straightway the cock crew.
75 And Peter remembered the word which Jesus had said, Before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice. And he went out, and wept bitterly.

crawfish
Mar 15th 2009, 03:09 PM
The bible says cussing is bad? A lot of the time, in this day and age, cussing is a language thing intended to emphasize a point. What does the Word say? How are we as contemporary people supposed to go?

I have a friend who became a Christian many years ago. He came from a family where foul language was so normal, so part of the daily vernacular, that he spoke it without even thinking. For years he would add colorful words to the conversation, even in church, without really realizing how offensive he was being. It took him many years to leave the habit; but his faith was strong and his intentions pure, so it did happen.

I think we should avoid words, phrases and terminology that are off-color because we are meant to stand out. I do not think we should judge those who use such language harshly, however; only God knows their heart.

There is the ideal, and there is the real. God desires the former, but through His grace accepts the latter.

Big Jake
Mar 15th 2009, 05:22 PM
It is possible to do everything that you mentioned without using profanity. I do it every day. However, If you want to tell the world that you are NOT a Christian, then swearing is the way to do it.

Matthew 26 (American Standard Version)
69 Now Peter was sitting without in the court: and a maid came unto him, saying, Thou also wast with Jesus the Galilaean.
70 But he denied before them all, saying, I know not what thou sayest.
71 And when he was gone out into the porch, another maid saw him, and saith unto them that were there, This man also was with Jesus of Nazareth.
72 And again he denied with an oath, I know not the man.
73 And after a little while they that stood by came and said to Peter, Of a truth thou also art one of them; for thy speech maketh thee known.
74 Then began he to curse and to swear, I know not the man. And straightway the cock crew.
75 And Peter remembered the word which Jesus had said, Before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice. And he went out, and wept bitterly.


I don't know exactly what swearing represents..but it is my understanding that God does look at the intentions of one's heart, and not just the words that come out of one's mouth. We know that Peter himself was forgiven later on by Jesus..despite his denial of him. Peter was a good man, and God knew this as he looked at the intentions of Peter's heart before he had chosen Peter as one of Jesus's chosen disciples.

I think of times where the Pharisees where called "sons of the devil" and "brood of vipers." These words may have actually caught the attention of these men, as they were meant to invoke a holy response of repentance within them. I think at times, one can be in desperate situations..such as Peter..and use words that aren't exactly pleasant to hear. So again, God looks at the heart..not just what comes out of one's mouth during perilous times. Specifically those times which test us.

MacBheathain
Mar 15th 2009, 10:03 PM
I don't know exactly what swearing represents..but it is my understanding that God does look at the intentions of one's heart, and not just the words that come out of one's mouth. We know that Peter himself was forgiven later on by Jesus..despite his denial of him. Peter was a good man, and God knew this as he looked at the intentions of Peter's heart before he had chosen Peter as one of Jesus's chosen disciples.

I think of times where the Pharisees where called "sons of the devil" and "brood of vipers." These words may have actually caught the attention of these men, as they were meant to invoke a holy response of repentance within them. I think at times, one can be in desperate situations..such as Peter..and use words that aren't exactly pleasant to hear. So again, God looks at the heart..not just what comes out of one's mouth during perilous times. Specifically those times which test us.

Gotta remember, what comes out of the mouth is a reflection of what is in the heart.

Just_Another_Guy
Mar 17th 2009, 05:07 PM
Gotta remember, what comes out of the mouth is a reflection of what is in the heart.

Isaiah 29
The Lord says: "These people come near to me with their mouth and honour me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me. Their worship of me is made up only of rules taught by men.

Well when the Pharissees said "Good Teacher" what was in their hearts? Nothing good would be my thought. I don't try to conceal everything that is on my mind from God. If I feel something is a miss, I say it..rather than conceal it..as God knows the heart anyway. I think that we can get too caught up with words at times. I've cursed many times in my life, but I know many times that my heart was indeed in the right place even when I've cursed at people. Sometimes it's just best to say what's on the brain..instead of always trying to conceal. I can respect a person to come out right and say something to me(not necessarily agree with though), moreso than one who consistently tries to conceal their intentions towards me.