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Firstfruits
Jan 24th 2009, 02:04 PM
According to the following scripture the Law Made Nothing Perfect, what therefore is the "better hope" that did?

Heb 7:19 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=58&CHAP=7&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=19) For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God.

According to the scriptures:
What is the hope by which we draw near unto God?
Why does the law not make anything perfect?

God bless You!

Firstfruits

tt1106
Jan 24th 2009, 02:26 PM
Romans 7
I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. 22For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:
23But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
24O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?
25I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin.


AAnnnnnndddddddddd Romans 8:


1There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
2For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.
3For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
5For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit.

Alaska
Jan 24th 2009, 08:40 PM
According to the following scripture the Law Made Nothing Perfect, what therefore is the "better hope" that did?

Heb 7:19 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=58&CHAP=7&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=19) For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God.

According to the scriptures:
What is the hope by which we draw near unto God?
Why does the law not make anything perfect?

God bless You!

Firstfruits


Romans 7
I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. 22For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:
23But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
24O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?
25I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin.


AAnnnnnndddddddddd Romans 8:


1There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
2For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.
3For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
5For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit.

Hi tt1106
How refreshing it is to see understanding.
I'm assuming that you have recognized the two laws Paul is referring to.
Now someone may ask, what does this have to do with Firstfruits question?
I think we see a good analogy in the book of Esther.
The first law from Haman condemned the Jews to die, but the second law gave them hope and then that hope was realized and the Jews were saved.
The OT law was the ministry of condemnation. There was a principle or "law" as Paul calls it, which in that situation all of mankind was under, not having the Messiah and the regeneration of the Holy Spirit in their lives. Paul describes this principle earlier in the same chapter in Romans revealing the frustration and inability in and of ourselves to truly be righteous:
Rom. 7:
14 For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, sold under sin.
15 For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
16 If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good.
17 Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
18 For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not.
19 For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
20 Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
21 I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.

This law, or principle, that Paul is describing in this text is basically a state of condemnation under which all men dwelt having the same experience that Paul demonstrates using himself as an example of what it was like to not have the Spirit.
This law is the "law of sin and death", which is the widely experienced human condition of even if we know what is right; that is different than actually being able do what is right due to the sin that dwells in us as in verse 20 above.

There is however another law that has come on the scene, like the second law in the book of Esther that was able to overpower the first law. This second law is the very thing that has given us hope. This law or principle was initiated by Christ's death and resurrection.
Paul makes a comparative reference to these two laws in
Rom. 8:
1 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.

This law or principle of sin and death was what kept all of mankind basically in the same state, under the control of sin to one extent or the other. Whether Jew or Gentile, we were basically all in the same boat:

Rom. 3:
9 What then? are we better than they? No, in no wise: for we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles, that they are all under sin;
22 Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference:

This righteousness is what gives us hope and this hope resulting from righteousness came from the initiation of a new "law" that enables us to overcome the power of the other existing "law" that would destroy us. "The law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus" makes someone free from the frustrating inability to be righteous, which they experienced while under "the law of sin and death". This available freedom from sin has its source in the power of the Holy Ghost dwelling in and enabling the true believer, which was only made possible by Christ's death and resurrection.
The NT freedom also cut out all of the unnecessary non-morally binding commandments from the OT and leaves us with only those necessary moral absolutes, such as "thou shalt not covet" [Romans 7:7], which is the example Paul is using in his demonstration of the operation of "the law of sin and death". Hence "the law is holy and just and good" [Rom. 7:12] does not apply and was not intended by Paul to refer to the unnecessary or abolished things from the OT, some of which are immoral by the greater NT standard of truth. Also, since Paul is still in the context of his example of morally binding absolutes, his phrase in Rom. 8:4 "That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit" does not apply to OT things not supported by the NT.

This commonly shared dilemma of being under "the law of sin and death" is the enemy of mankind. I believe that is what the Apostle Paul is referring to in
Eph. 2:
12 That at that time ye were without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope, and without God in the world:
13 But now in Christ Jesus ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ.
14 For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us;
15 Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;
16 And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:
17 And came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh.
18 For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.

The enmity shared by both Jew and Gentile that separated us both from God was "the law of sin and death" described by Paul in Rom. 7. I believe Paul's phrase above: "even the law of commandments contained in ordinances" is simply another way of describing that same law. Also that same spiritual principle or "law" cannot be separated from the written law under the OT that accompanied it. Even the moral absolutes, such as "thou shalt not covet" in that context of not providing deliverance from "the law of sin and death" only served to further manifest the state of condemnation ministered under that OT system. Notice the association Paul draws between the ten commandments and the ministry of condemnation:

2 Cor. 3:
6 Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.
7 But if the ministration of death, written and engraven in stones, was glorious, so that the children of Israel could not stedfastly behold the face of Moses for the glory of his countenance; which glory was to be done away:
8 How shall not the ministration of the spirit be rather glorious?
9 For if the ministration of condemnation be glory, much more doth the ministration of righteousness exceed in glory.
10 For even that which was made glorious had no glory in this respect, by reason of the glory that excelleth.
11 For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious.
12 Seeing then that we have such hope, we use great plainness of speech:

I think we can agree with Paul that the OT, including the ten commandments was in a certain sense at odds with us since it did not give us what was primarily necessary; "the law of the spirit of life" that would overcome "the law of sin and death" inherent in our nature from Adam.

Our death to that "old man", made possible by Christ's death for us, was the means by which "the law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus" was introduced, like the kings law in the book of Esther was introduced to combat the law that condemned.
The new wine comes with a new wineskin, hence the OT law was nailed to the cross with Christ and what is valid now in the NT is what remains after the ressurection:
2 Cor. 3:
11 For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious.

Even with regards to the moral absolutes carried over from the OT into the NT, there is a great difference: the first covenant having those moral absolutes coupled with the law of sin and death while in the second covenant those moral absolutes are connected to the new man in Christ, the law of sin and death having been defeated and the means whereby to abide in that victory are available by the more powerful "law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus".

Col. 2:
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.

Col. 1:
20 And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven.
21 And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled
22 In the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight:

Gal. 2:
21 I do not frustrate the grace of God: for if righteousness come by the law, then Christ is dead in vain.

Rom. 8:
3 For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4 That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.

Heb. 7:
18 For there is verily a disannulling of the commandment going before for the weakness and unprofitableness thereof.
19 For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God.

Ixthus
Jan 24th 2009, 08:52 PM
The better hope he is speaking of I believe is Jesus Christ.

Firstfruits
Jan 24th 2009, 09:03 PM
Hi tt1106
How refreshing it is to see understanding.
I'm assuming that you have recognized the two laws Paul is referring to.
Now someone may ask, what does this have to do with Firstfruits question?
I think we see a good analogy in the book of Esther.
The first law from Haman condemned the Jews to die, but the second law gave them hope and then that hope was realized and the Jews were saved.
The OT law was the ministry of condemnation. There was a principle or "law" as Paul calls it, which in that situation all of mankind was under, not having the Messiah and the regeneration of the Holy Spirit in their lives. Paul describes this principle earlier in the same chapter in Romans revealing the frustration and inability in and of ourselves to truly be righteous:
Rom. 7:
14 For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, sold under sin.
15 For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
16 If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good.
17 Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
18 For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not.
19 For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
20 Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
21 I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.

This law, or principle, that Paul is describing in this text is basically a state of condemnation under which all men dwelt having the same experience that Paul demonstrates using himself as an example of what it was like to not have the Spirit.
This law is the "law of sin and death", which is the widely experienced human condition of even if we know what is right; that is different than actually being able do what is right due to the sin that dwells in us as in verse 20 above.

There is however another law that has come on the scene, like the second law in the book of Esther that was able to overpower the first law. This second law is the very thing that has given us hope. This law or principle was initiated by Christ's death and resurrection.
Paul makes a comparative reference to these two laws in
Rom. 8:
1 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.

This law or principle of sin and death was what kept all of mankind basically in the same state, under the control of sin to one extent or the other. Whether Jew or Gentile, we were basically all in the same boat:

Rom. 3:
9 What then? are we better than they? No, in no wise: for we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles, that they are all under sin;
22 Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference:

This righteousness is what gives us hope and this hope resulting from righteousness came from the initiation of a new "law" that enables us to overcome the power of the other existing "law" that would destroy us. "The law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus" makes someone free from the frustrating inability to be righteous, which they experienced while under "the law of sin and death". This available freedom from sin has its source in the power of the Holy Ghost dwelling in and enabling the true believer, which was only made possible by Christ's death and resurrection.
The NT freedom also cut out all of the unnecessary non-morally binding commandments from the OT and leaves us with only those necessary moral absolutes, such as "thou shalt not covet" [Romans 7:7], which is the example Paul is using in his demonstration of the operation of "the law of sin and death". Hence "the law is holy and just and good" [Rom. 7:12] does not apply and was not intended by Paul to refer to the unnecessary or abolished things from the OT, some of which are immoral by the greater NT standard of truth. Also, since Paul is still in the context of his example of morally binding absolutes, his phrase in Rom. 8:4 "That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit" does not apply to OT things not supported by the NT.

This commonly shared dilemma of being under "the law of sin and death" is the enemy of mankind. I believe that is what the Apostle Paul is referring to in
Eph. 2:
12 That at that time ye were without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope, and without God in the world:
13 But now in Christ Jesus ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ.
14 For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us;
15 Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;
16 And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:
17 And came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh.
18 For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.

The enmity shared by both Jew and Gentile that separated us both from God was "the law of sin and death" described by Paul in Rom. 7. I believe Paul's phrase above: "even the law of commandments contained in ordinances" is simply another way of describing that same law. Also that same spiritual principle or "law" cannot be separated from the written law under the OT that accompanied it. Even the moral absolutes, such as "thou shalt not covet" in that context of not providing deliverance from "the law of sin and death" only served to further manifest the state of condemnation ministered under that OT system. Notice the association Paul draws between the ten commandments and the ministry of condemnation:

2 Cor. 3:
6 Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.
7 But if the ministration of death, written and engraven in stones, was glorious, so that the children of Israel could not stedfastly behold the face of Moses for the glory of his countenance; which glory was to be done away:
8 How shall not the ministration of the spirit be rather glorious?
9 For if the ministration of condemnation be glory, much more doth the ministration of righteousness exceed in glory.
10 For even that which was made glorious had no glory in this respect, by reason of the glory that excelleth.
11 For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious.
12 Seeing then that we have such hope, we use great plainness of speech:

I think we can agree with Paul that the OT, including the ten commandments was in a certain sense at odds with us since it did not give us what was primarily necessary; "the law of the spirit of life" that would overcome "the law of sin and death" inherent in our nature from Adam.

Our death to that "old man", made possible by Christ's death for us, was the means by which "the law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus" was introduced, like the kings law in the book of Esther was introduced to combat the law that condemned, which gave hope.
The new wine comes with a new wineskin, hence the OT law was nailed to the cross with Christ and what is valid now in the NT is what remains after the ressurection:
2 Cor. 3:
11 For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious.

Even with regards to the moral absolutes carried over from the OT into the NT, there is a great difference: the first covenant having those moral absolutes coupled with the law of sin and death while in the second covenant those moral absolutes are connected to the new man in Christ, the law of sin and death having been defeated and the means whereby to abide in that victory are available by the more powerful "law of the spirit of life in Christ Jesus".

Col. 2:
13 And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses;
14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;
15 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.

Col. 1:
20 And, having made peace through the blood of his cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in heaven.
21 And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled
22 In the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight:

Gal. 2:
21 I do not frustrate the grace of God: for if righteousness come by the law, then Christ is dead in vain.

Rom. 8:
3 For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4 That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.

Heb. 7:
18 For there is verily a disannulling of the commandment going before for the weakness and unprofitableness thereof.
19 For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God.


Thanks Alaska,

God bless you!

Firstfruits

Firstfruits
Jan 24th 2009, 09:05 PM
Romans 7
I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. 22For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:
23But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
24O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?
25I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin.


AAnnnnnndddddddddd Romans 8:


1There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
2For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.
3For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:
4That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
5For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit.

Thank you tt1106,

God bless you!

Firstfruits

Firstfruits
Jan 24th 2009, 09:11 PM
The better hope he is speaking of I believe is Jesus Christ.

Thanks Ixthus,

So since Christ is the "better hope" by following Christ we therefore are made perfect;

Col 1:28 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=51&CHAP=1&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=28) Whom we preach, warning every man, and teaching every man in all wisdom; that we may present every man perfect in Christ Jesus:

Col 4:12 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=51&CHAP=4&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=12) Epaphras, who is one of you, a servant of Christ, saluteth you, always labouring fervently for you in prayers, that ye may stand perfect and complete in all the will of God.

How therefore are we made perfect in Christ?

Firstfruits

theBelovedDisciple
Jan 24th 2009, 09:59 PM
The better hope he is speaking of I believe is Jesus Christ.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

I also agree.... the Better Hope is Jesus the Christ...


Thru the Law was the 'knowledge of sin'... and God sent His Own Son in the Likeness of Sinful flesh and for sin condemned sin in the flesh by nailing it (Jesus's body) to that Bloody Tree... Christ fulfilled the Law... Perfectly... and In Him we have Righteousness...the Righteousness which comes by 'faith'... His Righteousness... and Rightouesness of the Law is fulfilled in those who who walk not after the flesh but the Spirit....

God's Grace and Mercy is revealed in the Person of Jesus the Christ.. His Ministry.. His Atoning Work on that Tree.... God 'knew' that man in his own flesh(weak) could never fulfill the Law 100% ... so He sent His Son to do it.. what a Great and Merciful God we Serve...

He did what we could never do...

God could of just let us all die.. we dieing in our sins.....never fullfilling the Law 100% according to our flesh.. because it was 'weak'...but He made a Way.. for those to Believe on His Son and what He has accomplished... amen and amen..

Alaska
Jan 24th 2009, 11:04 PM
I reckon I should have gotten a great deal of flak for my post since I am declaring in it that Christ's death and resurrection represents our death and resurrection (He died for us) so that we now have access into a state of abiding in newness of life not controlled by the "law of sin and death", which refers to our natural state inherited from Adam whereby we were not able to truly live righteously.

"The law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus" relates to the transforming power made available to believers to no longer be subject or controlled by "the law of sin and death" as described by Paul:

Rom. 7:
19 For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
20 Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
21 I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.

Paul is describing the state of condemnation experienced by himself and all of mankind outside of the deliverance from that state of condemnation, which deliverance is in Christ Jesus and walking in the Spirit:

Rom. 8:
1 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.

That state of being under the law of sin and death, [frustration and the inability to live righteously in all honesty and a genuine good conscience], is a state of condemnation that Christians are supposed to be delivered from by the "law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus".
The NT reveals that by the power of the Holy Spirit Christians are supposed to overcome that old nature inherited from Adam.

In most cases those forms of Christianity not agreeing with the power made available and the introduction of this new "law" enabling the believer to overcome sin in their lives, treats the sinful condition we were born with as an inescapable reality that Jesus somehow only came to help us cope with instead of his coming being the provision of the means to overcome that nature. Hence these forms of Christianity deal with righteousness after the same manner as those under the law before Christ came. It could be said, that though believing in Jesus, their misunderstanding of righteousness places them in the same state of condemnation as those not believing in Jesus. They are in a similar way "bound to the law" being bound to that same old state of condemnation, denying the power of godliness.

2 Peter 1:
3 According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue:
4 Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.

Acts 3:
26 Unto you first God, having raised up his Son Jesus, sent him to bless you, in turning away every one of you from his iniquities.

2 Tim. 3:
1 This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
5 Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away.



Hence, the forms of Christianity so corrupting the true intent for Christ's coming, are in my opinion, antichrist.

Firstfruits
Jan 25th 2009, 11:24 AM
-------------------------------------------------------------------

I also agree.... the Better Hope is Jesus the Christ...


Thru the Law was the 'knowledge of sin'... and God sent His Own Son in the Likeness of Sinful flesh and for sin condemned sin in the flesh by nailing it (Jesus's body) to that Bloody Tree... Christ fulfilled the Law... Perfectly... and In Him we have Righteousness...the Righteousness which comes by 'faith'... His Righteousness... and Rightouesness of the Law is fulfilled in those who who walk not after the flesh but the Spirit....

God's Grace and Mercy is revealed in the Person of Jesus the Christ.. His Ministry.. His Atoning Work on that Tree.... God 'knew' that man in his own flesh(weak) could never fulfill the Law 100% ... so He sent His Son to do it.. what a Great and Merciful God we Serve...

He did what we could never do...

God could of just let us all die.. we dieing in our sins.....never fullfilling the Law 100% according to our flesh.. because it was 'weak'...but He made a Way.. for those to Believe on His Son and what He has accomplished... amen and amen..

So faith is the key to perfection through Christ, and since as it is written;

Gal 3:12 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=48&CHAP=3&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=12) And the law is not of faith: but, The man that doeth them shall live in them.

Col 2:6 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=51&CHAP=2&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=6) As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him:

Heb 7:19 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=58&CHAP=7&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=19) For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God.

Jn 14:6 (http://bibledatabase.org/cgi-bin/bib_search/bible.cgi?BIBLE=48&BOOK=43&CHAP=14&SEARCH=jesus king lord&Read=Read&FIRST=OK&HV=6) Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.

God bless you!

Firstfruits