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Friend of Jesus
Jan 27th 2009, 09:42 AM
Why are so many Christians "right wing"?

When it comes to politics I generally try not to get involved in picking a party (as politics is so corrupt these days). However recently I've picked up on how many "right wing" Christians there are. Anyone know why this is? I would have thought that "left wing" policies/ideals fit more with the teachings of the Bible?

Revinius
Jan 27th 2009, 12:20 PM
I think it's cos Christianity is counter cultural and the more liberal spectrum of politics is geared towards getting away from tradition. Christianity was more set into culture in days gone by and as such the liberal 'reforms' tend to be anti-Christian.

Dauwq
Jan 27th 2009, 01:40 PM
Hi there

Well while you might be right in saying that many christians are right wing orientated I am not. I work for the Democratic Alliance. I really do pray for this country alot. I think that we as christians look at it incorrectly sometimes. Though we tend to vote the way we think this might not always be right. Even though I am a christian and I vote for a more liberal party this does not mean that I support all their views.


Most important is to keep on praying for those in government.

Christian Sweetie
Jan 28th 2009, 05:10 AM
I think it's because, for me anyway, that those on the left-wing consisently tear down and demonize Christians. Here in Canada, the NDP and Liberals always strip our freedom of speech lest we "offend" someone and generally have a very condescending attitude towards us. They openly mocked an MP who was the leader of a right-wing party for his Christian believes. I believe they called him "crazy" though I may be paraphrasing. I don't know about you, but I'm not about to join up with parties that call my beliefs "crazy".

And it's like Revinius said, right-wingers are more traditional and family-oriented; liberals generally are not. So that's another reason.

Athanasius
Jan 28th 2009, 05:11 AM
Liberals are very orthordox.. Free, open minded thinkers very closed off. Quite the paradox, but true. Very rarely will you find a liberal liberal.

catholicdude
Jan 28th 2009, 11:35 PM
Liberals are very orthordox.. Free, open minded thinkers very closed off. Quite the paradox, but true. Very rarely will you find a liberal liberal.

I've never heard this, liberals have always seemed foot loose and fancy free to me, any goes with a liberal.

To the OP, most Christians are right-winged because left-winged people dislike Christian virtues and much of what they stand for goes against the Bible. And because most Christians have common sense and understand that liberal politics don't work, but that's for a different part of the forum.

Pax,
Zach

CactusCarlos
Jan 29th 2009, 12:38 AM
I would have thought that "left wing" policies/ideals fit more with the teachings of the Bible?

What "left wing" policies/ideals specifically fit more with the teachings of the Bible?

Friend of Jesus
Jan 29th 2009, 07:48 AM
What "left wing" policies/ideals specifically fit more with the teachings of the Bible?

Well the main thing is that there is more of a sharing of wealth. In a "right wing" country there tends to be more emphasis on what the world calls 'success' and what God calls a waste of time.

Also, left wing groups tend to be kinder to other ethnic groups. For instance in England, the Conservatives believe that we should strongly limit immigration, want to vanquish council housing and lower taxes (which is good for the rich but bad for the poor). It was also the Conservatives that were originally against public health care (good for the rich).

I don't know about America, but in England "left wing" groups are more charitable, and the "Right Wing" groups don't seem to have any obvious Christian morals. Hense why I was confused as to why so many Christians were right wing.

I should point out that I am not left wing, nor right wing. Politics from my point of view doesn't seem to change much- it's best simply to pray for whatever party is in power.

Athanasius
Jan 29th 2009, 08:45 PM
I've never heard this, liberals have always seemed foot loose and fancy free to me, any goes with a liberal.

Seemed and are, are two different things ;)

Izdaari
Feb 13th 2009, 05:46 PM
In terms of politics, I'm neither right nor left in the conventional sense, but I see the world as Reagan described it here:

You and I are told increasingly that we have to choose between a left or a right. There is only an up or down: up to man's age-old dream -- the ultimate in individual freedom consistent with law and order -- or down to the ant heap of totalitarianism. And regardless of their sincerity, their humanitarian motives, those who would trade our freedom for security have embarked on this downward course. Ronald Reagan (http://www.friesian.com/presiden.htm#40), Republican National Convention, 1964


And IMHO conservatives, liberals, right, left, Republicans, Democrats, Tories and Labour, all do very poorly when it comes to promoting that ideal. The label that seems to fit it best is classical liberal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_liberalism) or libertarian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarianism), so that's what I call myself.

Within the libertarian spectrum, I identify most with libertarian conservatism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_conservatism). Though I often feel compelled to vote for one of the major parties as the 'lesser evil', I am a member of the Libertarian Party (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_Party_%28United_States%29).

Revinius
Feb 14th 2009, 01:08 PM
I believe it is up and down: Up in that you are worshipping God; Down in that you are worshipping yourself or something else.

Izdaari
Feb 14th 2009, 01:14 PM
I believe it is up and down: Up in that you are worshipping God; Down in that you are worshipping yourself or something else.
That's true too, but that's worship, not politics. :cool:

Revinius
Feb 15th 2009, 01:42 PM
That's true too, but that's worship, not politics. :cool:

I don't believe they are seperate.

Izdaari
Feb 16th 2009, 12:03 AM
I don't believe they are seperate.
In a sense, everything a Christ-follower does should be an act of worship. But I worship God in the three divine persons, not the state.

Do I consider God's will in the voting booth? You bet I do! Jesus didn't say, imply or even hint that we should try to establish the Kingdom of Heaven by attempting to influence national policy. We do it from the ground up, by changing ourselves and those around us, not from the top down.

And I don't believe we show much love for God or do His will by trying to establish a theocracy or a theonomy. Rather, I believe that most godly form of government we can have is what America's Founders established, a limited constitutional republic, pluralistic, with full freedom of speech and of religion. Only Jesus, when He returns, is qualified to run a theocratic state... if He would choose to do so.

Bex4Jesus
Feb 16th 2009, 01:58 PM
I don't really undestand it either. In America, I think like EVERY person in the House and Senate (other than one Muslim) is either Jewish or Christian (which includes Catholics). Every one! At least that's what a political science professor told us.

So if they mostly Christians, I don't understand why people would think the governement is anti-Christian. I know people disagree about abortion and gay marriage, but look at how the progressive groups try to help the poor and uneducated. The Republicans don't do that.

I look at the two parties and I see this...

Liberals - help the poor, respect human rights, treat everyone as equals, help the homeless, people with AIDS, build schools and libraries and teach people, don't let the government teach a certain religion,

versus

Conservatives - everyone for themselves! homelessness should be illegal! gay people aren't allowed to express their love, people deserve to get AIDS because they sin, let's spend a ton of money on the military, which as we all know is designed to kill people and destroy things.

Like with the stimulus, the Republicans objected to spending $800 billion on things like schools, tax cuts, environmental programs, work programs, etc. but they were happy to spend over $600 billion so far on the war in Iraq. How does that make sense???

I know where I stand,

Bex

Revinius
Feb 16th 2009, 03:35 PM
I doubt most of them are Christians, most certainly would call themselves Christians though.

Christian Sweetie
Feb 17th 2009, 03:16 AM
I don't really undestand it either. In America, I think like EVERY person in the House and Senate (other than one Muslim) is either Jewish or Christian (which includes Catholics). Every one! At least that's what a political science professor told us.
Bex

There's a huge difference between calling yourself a Christian and actually being a Christian. I know some "Christians" who are only that term in name, even going so far as to mock Christ. Take Canada for example. Trudeau claimed to be Catholic, then went ahead and took steps to legalize abortion, flipped off the entire Western Canada, and was rude and condescending. Not exactly "Christ-like".

Athanasius
Feb 17th 2009, 05:15 PM
Political science professors also neglect to use the word 'nominal', as does every atheist trying to make a case against religion in the west.

Rhyfelwr
Feb 18th 2009, 12:24 PM
I support a collectivist approach to domestic politics. I think that the government should aim to create full employment, that people should be guaranteed health care, decent schooling etc.

I think there is a misunderstanding of what left/right means. From what I gather, in the US the "left" is seen as socialist/social democratic, the "right" is seen as libertarians/free marketers. However, the way I see it is:

Left - big government, full employment, nationalised services/industries etc
Right - big government, full employment, nationalised services/industries etc
Centre - libertarian, free market, small government

Most 'Christian Right' referred to in the US would fall into the 'Centre' category. The difference between the left and right is their ideologies. The left is very liberal on moral issues, very international in its approach (free movement of labour etc, in this respect similar to the 'Centre' - it must be very annoying to be a British worker in a recession and be told that some Portuguese were invited in to take the only available jobs). On the other hand, the right tends to be more protectionist, and believes the government has a role in moral issues.

I suppose by those definitions I would fall into the 'Right' category, because as Christian I can't accept the left's lack of morals, but I think the 'Centre' approach lacks compassion and fails to provide for people's basic needs.

RabbiKnife
Feb 18th 2009, 07:00 PM
Conservatives in America want private citizens to use their money to help the poor and downtrodden.

Liberals in America want the government to take the money from the private citizens to use to help the poor and downtrodden.

"Liberalism," when applied to governmental systems, is usually confiscatory of private property.

RabbiKnife
Feb 18th 2009, 07:01 PM
Why do governments have to provide for people's basic needs.
That is the role of:
1. The individual
2. The family
3. The church.

technotask
Feb 20th 2009, 09:07 AM
Many asian countries right wing give their support to Christian people... Most of the say 90% of christians are right wing in asia...

Izdaari
Feb 20th 2009, 07:54 PM
I support a collectivist approach to domestic politics. I think that the government should aim to create full employment, that people should be guaranteed health care, decent schooling etc.

I think there is a misunderstanding of what left/right means. From what I gather, in the US the "left" is seen as socialist/social democratic, the "right" is seen as libertarians/free marketers. However, the way I see it is:

Left - big government, full employment, nationalised services/industries etc
Right - big government, full employment, nationalised services/industries etc
Centre - libertarian, free market, small government

Most 'Christian Right' referred to in the US would fall into the 'Centre' category. The difference between the left and right is their ideologies. The left is very liberal on moral issues, very international in its approach (free movement of labour etc, in this respect similar to the 'Centre' - it must be very annoying to be a British worker in a recession and be told that some Portuguese were invited in to take the only available jobs). On the other hand, the right tends to be more protectionist, and believes the government has a role in moral issues.

I suppose by those definitions I would fall into the 'Right' category, because as Christian I can't accept the left's lack of morals, but I think the 'Centre' approach lacks compassion and fails to provide for people's basic needs.
By that definition, I would be a raging Centrist. And I see you put the American 'Christian Right' there too. However, unlike most of the 'Christian Right', I do not believe in a role for government in moral issues. I am libertarian in both economics and social policy. That isn't because of any "lack of morals" on my part, but simply that I don't believe government is the appropriate tool to fight moral battles.

Majulah Singapura
Mar 19th 2009, 08:36 AM
um... I don't know which is left and right, sorry, but I'm against socialism and pro conservatives, whichever that is... it's pretty simple. The whole take from the rich and give to the poor thing I don't feel is part of Christianity the way the reds do it today. And also, they tend to be the ones for abortion, for euthanasia, etc etc, and here in NZ if you look at the situation, we have a newly elected blue (conservative) leader and his leadership is fine, but he isn't undoing the work of the reds.

Which is the issue. We here have had an anti-smacking bill, a civil union bill, and a prostitution bill in the wrong direction to name a few. And the conservatives don't do enough to reverse that.

The other thing, I guess for me, is that (ironically) the conservatives tend to be at least neutral on the Israel/Palestine issue, whereas the liberals (even the feminists, who would otherwise be screaming bloody murder over the mistreatment of Women in the Middle East) are always advocating the poor little Palestinians who warp the figures, even though they've never seen MEMRI (www.memri.org) or the Hamas Charter or learnt Arabic... Of course, there are exceptions like Alan Dershowitz, who's a really good liberal author who's fiercely pro-Israel.

RedBird777
Mar 25th 2009, 09:55 PM
This is the Libertarian standpoint on this...so I KNOW I am going to get bashed for this.

In the United States of America, the founding fathers separated Church and State. The problem now is that people like to clump Christians with "right-wing", when this is not necessarily true. It is true that most Christians are more conservative, but take a look at we believe! It is very against the liberal thought. Since the founding fathers despised big government in any way, the Democrat AND Republican viewpoints go against America and where it should stand. Most of the founding fathers, in some way, shape or form, were "Christian". The belief in smaller government is a more Republican way of thinking. However, they did not fully put in their Christian viewpoint while creating the USA.

My own personal belief is that the political parties should stop bringing in these moralistic standards and bringing religion into it. The bashing and hatred caused by this is unbelievable. I really do hate how this country is getting destroyed by "left wing this" and "right wing that". This is NOT how a country is supposed to be run! Religion has not been much of an issue until recently. But WHY recently? The answer is socialism. Socialism controls its people - even their belief systems. The reason why Christians are on the "right wing" of things is because socialism has infiltrated into (mainly) the Democrat/Liberal view, and clouds their judgment on how to govern their people. Christianity has been mocked and bashed by the socialist propaganda, and we as Christians should hate this coming from our government. I'm not saying to hate socialists...DO NOT HATE THE PEOPLE WHO RUN OUR GOVERNMENT. We should pray for them. We should hate their actions and the evil that they spread. Socialism wants to destroy Christianity, and it's working itself little by little.

I guess what I am trying to say, is that religion and government are two different species in America because it was originally meant to be that way.


Now a little education time:
There is a HUGE difference between Liberal and Democrat. There is also a huge difference between Conservative and Republican.

Liberal/Conservative: Moral Values
Democrat/Republican: Government styles

That means that we can switch up stuff, like create Liberal Republicans, and Conservative Democrats. So it is quite unfortunate that we stereotypically mash together Liberal-Democrat (left) and Conservative-Republican (right).

*Hope*
Apr 4th 2009, 01:35 AM
I highly recommend a book called A Christian Manifesto by Francis Schaeffer and another one of his called How Should We Then Live? Each book shows how our culture has been influenced by philosophies over the centuries and how our culture reflects beliefs. A belief begins with thoughts, ideas (philosophies) and once those begin to be influential, you start to see them reflected in education, art, government and theology.

The conservative side still holds some semblance of value for human life. This, first and foremost, is the reason Christians hold to (and should continue to hold to) conservative political views.