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View Full Version : Those who are accustomed to meat and not milk



JohnDB
Nov 2nd 2009, 08:28 PM
There is a point of view that I have been wondering about but my studies and work schedule haven't allowed me to do any real studying and point making that allow me the time to accurately do a study.

There is a device called a syndoche in scripture...which led me to thinking about all of this.

In Genesis we don't hear much of a description of God at all...except that He came in early morning as the sun was rising...same thing in Judges with Gideon...and Samuel's mother proclaiming the birth of Samuel. They would say where he had been and what was said...Samuel being the first time that the name is said to be more wonderful and beyond understanding.

Then in the prophets we see some more of God being described when people had encounters with Him...Isaiah describes the wisdom of God...

Ezekiel describes the train of God (symbolizing majesty)

Daniel is the first time physical attibutes are described about God...(Son of Man and etc) Zechariah does a little more...

finally we have the revealing of the Christ himself with Jesus...

And finally a description with John's "revelation" with Jesus as the conquoring Hero and ruler of all things.

There are many points and descriptions I have missed in this brief description...but it seems to me that there has been a slow revealing across the ages...and with a final one to come.

Any takers of this study?

Psalms Fan
Nov 2nd 2009, 10:43 PM
I agree about the points you made. God's revelation of Himself increases little by little over time, sort of like turning a light with a dimmer switch after you're accustomed to pitch black darkness. You keep turning it up little by little until you're ready for the full brightness. I believe it was the same way with God's revelation of Himself until Christ.

Also, I agree about revelation that is yet to come. Even after Christ returns, we're all judged, and we've entered into eternity, we are still approaching an infinite God as finite creatures. So throughout all eternity, our understanding of God will be growing, since He is eternal and infinite Himself.

JohnDB
Nov 3rd 2009, 03:33 PM
I was hoping for the nuts and bolts of it all...

It isn't a study for the faint of heart or someone who doesn't know scripture really well...looking at the Hebrew and Greek isn't going to be easy either for all of the nuances that it will contain either.

ahh well...maybe one day I will get the time to put it all together.

ThyWordIsTruth
Nov 3rd 2009, 04:08 PM
There is a point of view that I have been wondering about but my studies and work schedule haven't allowed me to do any real studying and point making that allow me the time to accurately do a study.

There is a device called a syndoche in scripture...which led me to thinking about all of this.

In Genesis we don't hear much of a description of God at all...except that He came in early morning as the sun was rising...same thing in Judges with Gideon...and Samuel's mother proclaiming the birth of Samuel. They would say where he had been and what was said...Samuel being the first time that the name is said to be more wonderful and beyond understanding.

Then in the prophets we see some more of God being described when people had encounters with Him...Isaiah describes the wisdom of God...

Ezekiel describes the train of God (symbolizing majesty)

Daniel is the first time physical attibutes are described about God...(Son of Man and etc) Zechariah does a little more...

finally we have the revealing of the Christ himself with Jesus...

And finally a description with John's "revelation" with Jesus as the conquoring Hero and ruler of all things.

There are many points and descriptions I have missed in this brief description...but it seems to me that there has been a slow revealing across the ages...and with a final one to come.

Any takers of this study?

Hmm...just a thought. We must bear in mind that the first four books of the Bible were actually written by Moses. Hence even before Moses, I think men knew God intimately for the following reasons.

Abraham was called a friend of God. That would suggest great intimacy and knowledge of God.

Enoch walked with God and God took him to heaven. I think Enoch probably had a good knowledge of God's character.

In fact, I think the early people had a far greater knowledge of God then we do now. Abimelech was alarmed when God told him in a dream not to touch Sarah. I don't think rulers these days would pay much attention.

In fact, the early Israelites saw the glory of God in a very real way in the pillars of cloud and fire, and saw many miracles, including hearing God thunder from heaven. That'll give one a pretty good impression of God I'd think.

Also, God's character can be clearly seen in the laws he gave to Moses. It is very clear from the law what God's character is like, what matters to Him, what he loves, what he hates, etc.

JohnDB
Nov 3rd 2009, 04:29 PM
Hmm...just a thought. We must bear in mind that the first four books of the Bible were actually written by Moses. Hence even before Moses, I think men knew God intimately for the following reasons.

Abraham was called a friend of God. That would suggest great intimacy and knowledge of God.

Enoch walked with God and God took him to heaven. I think Enoch probably had a good knowledge of God's character.

In fact, I think the early people had a far greater knowledge of God then we do now. Abimelech was alarmed when God told him in a dream not to touch Sarah. I don't think rulers these days would pay much attention.

In fact, the early Israelites saw the glory of God in a very real way in the pillars of cloud and fire, and saw many miracles, including hearing God thunder from heaven. That'll give one a pretty good impression of God I'd think.

Also, God's character can be clearly seen in the laws he gave to Moses. It is very clear from the law what God's character is like, what matters to Him, what he loves, what he hates, etc.

That is a given. God always did reveal his Character througout the bible. That is the purpose of it. (You need an edit about the four books of moses though...it was five...I know exodus is written as a continuation of Genesis but it is thought to be a book separate unto itself)

The other unique thing is about how God knows the hearts of men. (heart being thoughts, feelings as well as actions)...that was also slowly revealed. The thought that God knew the future as well as the past was always clear. But knowing the hearts of men was only fully revealed in Daniel...which was astounding to them in that day and time. We pass it off as a normal thought today...but it was really dramatic in his day and time. And for some reason the Jews still wanted to hug a codiefied Law instead of looking for a heart attitude...