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infinityy
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:36 AM
Paul speaks about this, something about taking communion in a unworthy manner. Me and the wife smoke and are not 100% unrepentant in our sins

-SEEKING-
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:41 AM
Paul speaks about this, something about taking communion in a unworthy manner. Me and the wife smoke and are not 100% unrepentant in our sins

What exactly do you mean by not 100% unrepentant?

infinityy
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:49 AM
What exactly do you mean by not 100% unrepentant?
By not following Jesus 100% as he would want. When I read the NT, it seems to me Jesus wants us to die to ourselves in every way shape and form. Not to be a fan of Jesus, but a true follower of him. I feel I've missed this mark. I don't know, it's hard to explain my feelings

-SEEKING-
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:51 AM
Well let me ask you a question. Are you a Christian? Did you give your life to Jesus? Accept his gift of salvation? Take Him as your savior? And lastly, how has that impacted your life?

webhead
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:52 AM
Paul speaks about this, something about taking communion in a unworthy manner. Me and the wife smoke and are not 100% unrepentant in our sins

Read 1 Cor 11 in it's entirety. Unworthy communion has nothing to do with unrepented sin. If you are born from above through Christ, you are repented of your sins. No such thing as being "prayed up or repented up" as some teach. No man is without sin, and the scriptures are clear on this. But our sins are covered by the blood of Christ if we are saved.

Here is what the Corinthians were doing during communion.

1 Cor 11:18For first of all, when ye come together in the church, I hear that there be divisions among you; and I partly believe it. 19For there must be also heresies among you, that they which are approved may be made manifest among you.
20When ye come together therefore into one place, this is not to eat the Lord's supper.
21For in eating every one taketh before other his own supper: and one is hungry, and another is drunken.
22What? have ye not houses to eat and to drink in? or despise ye the church of God, and shame them that have not? what shall I say to you? shall I praise you in this? I praise you not.



The Corinthians were feasting and getting drunk, and calling it communion, and this caused a great division in their church because of the communion heresies.

-SEEKING-
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:54 AM
That's an excellent point WH. Everything in context.

tim_from_pa
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:54 AM
Paul speaks about this, something about taking communion in a unworthy manner. Me and the wife smoke and are not 100% unrepentant in our sins

This has nothing to do with taking communion. You can still partake. Read the context about an unworthy manner. How do we partake unworthily? By not discerning the Lord's body. The focus is on the Lord and what He has done, not our sins. As a matter of fact, the very idea of being obcessed with sins and "how we can improve" ironically is the very thing that makes one partake in an unworthy manner.

Psalms Fan
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:55 AM
I'm not one who believes that any of us will ever be completely sinless this side of eternity. No matter how repentant you may be, if your desire is to take communion you will be taking communion with some amount of sin in your life.

With that said, if there's some sin in your life that you're totally aware of but you're not willing to turn from it, in that case I'd recommend against taking communion. But if you are in the position that you know there's sin in your life, but you're working against the sin and repenting of it, I'd say that that is the ideal christian life and that one ought to take communion.

markedward
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:57 AM
No, it is not wrong to take the communion when you have sin in your life. Christians would be lying if we said we had no sin. Being a sinner does not mean you cannot partake in the communion.

But, you openly admit that you are in a sinful habit, and you openly admit that you have been unwilling to give up that sinful habit. By definition, you are "living in sin", which, as you admit yourself, means you are unrepentant.

Now that you've openly admitted that you have lived in sin without repentance... what are you going to do about it? Are you going to continue living in sin? [1 John 3.6] Or are you going to repent and call upon Christ to help you do what you can do put it to a stop?

infinityy
Dec 2nd 2009, 02:59 AM
Well let me ask you a question. Are you a Christian? Did you give your life to Jesus? Accept his gift of salvation? Take Him as your savior? And lastly, how has that impacted your life?
When I think about his love for me I cry, I cry hard thinking about how he forgave me and shown me mercy. To me he is the Lord of Lords and King of Kings. He is all I think about. I have accepted his free gift of salvation.

FinalTrump
Dec 2nd 2009, 03:00 AM
By not following Jesus 100% as he would want. When I read the NT, it seems to me Jesus wants us to die to ourselves in every way shape and form. Not to be a fan of Jesus, but a true follower of him. I feel I've missed this mark. I don't know, it's hard to explain my feelings

You are right, and none of us follow 100%. Even the Apostle Paul says he does the things he doesn't want to do and doesn't do the things he want to. We can never be perfect in deed, but we can be perfect in heart.

It is a growing process for all of us. When we reach the "mark of perfect love" and stood, we die. We have finished the course, we have fought the fight, we have overcome and hence forth a crown of live is laid up for us.

We are all struggling with sins and weaknesses. I think I consider smoking a weakness. On the other hand if you were living in sin, and then thought it was OK to partake of the Lord's Memorial, you would be on very dangerous ground, and had better not take it.

So we can only do our best, at least we should be doing our best, that is what we promised when we gave our life to the Lord, and like I said, it is a growing process, it doesn't happen overnight, but we should be making steps of progress every day on all of our short comings, and little by little we should see the light at the end of the tunnel (which doesn't mean we won't slip and fall, but we had better get back up and get back on track).

I think a great book for you to read is "Pilgrim's Progress." You have to find a very old copy with footnotes. I have had 2 different ones with footnotes and without them you miss half of the story or more. John Bunyan the author lived in the 1600s and it is an allegory of the Christian life and all the pitfalls and fears that go with it and how it is eventually overcome.

Go to ebay and find one, you won't be disappointed.

IsItLove?
Dec 2nd 2009, 08:49 AM
This has nothing to do with taking communion. You can still partake. Read the context about an unworthy manner. How do we partake unworthily? By not discerning the Lord's body. The focus is on the Lord and what He has done, not our sins. As a matter of fact, the very idea of being obcessed with sins and "how we can improve" ironically is the very thing that makes one partake in an unworthy manner.

BIG AMEN TO THAT!

Our communion restored

This past Sunday I was speaking on communion.

It was once called our love feast.
It was all about celebrating Jesus life and death by partaking of His life in loving one another.
Remembering Him together, speaking of all that he has done and is doing in our lives.
People sharing their homes, their food, their lives, their hearts
They had communion with one another, and so also with God.
They would declare God's works to one another, always giving thanks to God from their hearts.
Imagine being in a home full of people and everyone is talking about what God has done, randomly raising their cup in thanks and giving praise to God from the overflow of the hearts. Everyone was singing songs to one another as an encouragement. Because all of this was happening the power of the Spirit of God was showing.

Now consider what 2000 years of religion and tradition has reduced it to.
A squirt of juice and a crumb of bread,
taken in silence and isolated introspection,
while many are in fear, focusing on their sin.

I so long to see our communion restored to its fullness!

notuptome
Dec 2nd 2009, 01:43 PM
When I think about his love for me I cry, I cry hard thinking about how he forgave me and shown me mercy. To me he is the Lord of Lords and King of Kings. He is all I think about. I have accepted his free gift of salvation.
Amen. You have met the primary requirement to come to the Lords table.
The salvation requirement. It is the Lords table and not the churches table. Paul wrote to instruct the church at Corinth a church that was a real mess. They had abused the Lords table eating and drinking like a bunch of modern day party goers. Their heart attitude was way out of line with God and His holiness and purity.

Now we are clearly instructed to examine ourselves before we partake. This is self examination before the Lord not examination of each other in public. Some in the church at Corinth were eating without regard to the Lord and were weak and sickly and some were dead. This is physical death and not spiritual death.

If the Lord is convicting your heart about a specific sin then you need to address that with Him before you eat. If someone else is on you about your smoking then that is a different matter. Smoking is something I think you should stop for the sake of your testimony. In the past smoking was considered medicinal in the treatment of asthma. Some old time preachers smoked. I think C.H. Spurgeon was one such mighty man used of God who indulged. Smoking stinks and while it won't send you to hell it does make you smell like you visited there. Would your witness before the lost that you love and desire to see saved be more effective if you quit? The Lord can give you victory over smoking and peace about the matter.

I cannot in good conscience suggest that one ever take the Lords table lightly. We are remembering how His body was broken for us and His blood was shed for us on Calvary. High and holy thoughts indeed. Jesus has cleansed us from our sin. Jesus washed the disciples feet that they might be clean every bit to wit. Ask of Him a clean heart with which to eat and He will give it to you. Eat or don't eat because you are persuaded of the Lord and not of men. We did not merit salvation but He saved us and only in His righteousness are we made worthy to commune with Him at His table. He loved us when we were sinners how much more now that we are His. I think He wants us to come to His table because we are not worthy just redeemed and rejoicing to say so.

There is great joy and peace when we draw close to our Lord and have fellowship with Him. Peace and joy the world cannot know.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

tim_from_pa
Dec 2nd 2009, 01:56 PM
Now consider what 2000 years of religion and tradition has reduced it to.
A squirt of juice and a crumb of bread,
taken in silence and isolated introspection,
while many are in fear, focusing on their sin.

I so long to see our communion restored to its fullness!

That's because a squirt of juice and crumb of bread has been the main diet of spiritual teaching unfortunately.

Firefighter
Dec 2nd 2009, 03:34 PM
That's because a squirt of juice and crumb of bread has been the main diet of spiritual teaching unfortunately.

:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

I am often amazed at the bits of truth I often see here on this board. This was one of them.

BroRog
Dec 2nd 2009, 04:53 PM
I want to come at this from left field so please bear with me.

Does anyone remember where they were and what they were doing when . . .



Kennedy was assassinated?
Man landed on the moon?
Woodstock took place?
The Twin Towers fell on 9/11?


Each of these events, and others like it, are examples of highly significant times that touched thousands, even millions of people. And those who had an emotional investment in the event can vividly recall what they were doing when they heard the news or experienced the event themselves. A commonly shared experience is a powerful thing, from which those who experienced it have a unique bond.

Think about the Jewish Exodus. Think about the social and emotional ties that developed between those who experienced the supernatural plagues together and ultimately escaped slavery after God put to death all the first born children in Egypt. These particular Jews shared something unique in common with each other that bound them together as a people, such that they could say, "If you weren't there, you couldn't possibly know what we went through."

And yet, God established and Moses perpetuated a community meal, which was designed specifically as a memorial to the Passover event and the subsequent Exodus from Egypt. Each person living at the time ate each subsequent Passover meal with the sights, sounds, fears, and hopes vividly in mind, perhaps causing these images and feelings to come streaming back to awareness in full force, and along with that the familiarity, closeness, and sociability shared in common with fellow Jews.

Not only this, but the Passover meal allows subsequent generations of Jews to participate in and commune with their ancestors, in which the memorial of past events is mixed with a memorial of recent events such as the Holocaust and the Pogroms which, again, causes each individual Jew to unite both emotionally and socially to every other Jew. This union is so powerful and influential it forms part of a Jew's personal identity.

The Lord's supper was supposed to be this kind of thing. Just as the Jews came together each year in acknowledgment of a common bond between them, which united those who experienced the Exodus with the children of those who experienced it in an unbreakable bond down through the generations, Paul established the communion meal for Christians in order that they too, might have a means to remember what they also share in common, which was salvation in Christ.

Corinthian meeting was far from a shared meal among those who shared the same thoughts and feelings, connected by a strong social bond, born of a shared experience in Christ. Those who gorged themselves while others went hungry behaved in way that stood in sharp contrast to the character and purpose of the communion meal. The condemning question hung over the meal like a heavy weight, "If you can't even share food, how does your claim to communion with Christ and his followers have any credence?"

The Mighty Sword
Dec 2nd 2009, 04:59 PM
These two ordinances are both mentioned in Acts 2:41-42.


Baptism and communion if you have been baptized you can take communion.

Acts 2:41-42 41Those who accepted his message were baptized, and about three thousand were added to their number that day.

The Fellowship of the Believers

42They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and to the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer.

goykodesh
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:22 PM
These two ordinances are both mentioned in Acts 2:41-42.


Baptism and communion if you have been baptized you can take communion.

Acts 2:41-42 41Those who accepted his message were baptized, and about three thousand were added to their number that day.

The Fellowship of the Believers

42They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and to the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer.

I guess I don't understand communion. Verse 42 is standard Jewish tradition, even to this day, notibly at sunset on saturday.

The Mighty Sword
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:24 PM
I guess I don't understand communion. Verse 42 is standard Jewish tradition, even to this day, notibly at sunset on saturday.

That's probably because Jesus was a Jew.

markedward
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:26 PM
When you say you don't understand communion... do you mean, you don't see how it's in the verse, or you don't understand its purpose?

goykodesh
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:33 PM
When you say you don't understand communion... do you mean, you don't see how it's in the verse, or you don't understand its purpose?

I understand the purpose. I mean I don't see how it's in the verse. Is communion normally treated as a command or a tradition?

markedward
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:34 PM
I'd say it's treated as a command within Scripture. Christ did say, "Do this in remembrance of me."

notuptome
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:39 PM
I guess I don't understand communion. Verse 42 is standard Jewish tradition, even to this day, notibly at sunset on saturday.
I do not see vs 42 as speaking to communion but to the sharing of meals and sharing prayers. A time of fellowship among the apostles and disciples.

Communion as described by Paul in 1 Cor 11 is a remberance of the suffering and sacrifice of our Lord for our redemption. A time of fellowship with the Lord.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

FinalTrump
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:40 PM
I guess I don't understand communion. Verse 42 is standard Jewish tradition, even to this day, notibly at sunset on saturday.


Not everywhere it talks about "breaking bread" is about communion.

We call it Memorial, when we commemorate the Last supper with the bread and wine. We do it once a year on its anniversary.

Many times when it talks about breaking bread, it is just talking about a meal, a literal meal.

We have small house type meetings and especially where I used to go before we moved, we always had a meal together after the meeting.

The "breaking of bread" with the brethren is very important. We are to love the brethren and lay our lives down for one another.

If we go to church and leave right after and have no fellowship, how can we possibly love them (philio or agape), how can we expect to lay our lives down for people we don't even know or love.

So I see that verse as you do, that it is not talking about communion (Memorial).

RabbiKnife
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:42 PM
So is washing of the saints feet, but very few groups follow that command/tradition!

Reynolds357
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:46 PM
Paul speaks about this, something about taking communion in a unworthy manner. Me and the wife smoke and are not 100% unrepentant in our sins
It is wrong to intentionally keep sin in your life. Why would you intentionally keep sin in your life?

BroRog
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:54 PM
I'd say it's treated as a command within Scripture. Christ did say, "Do this in remembrance of me."

Jesus said, "Do this (that is, eat the Passover meal) in remembrance of me." This wouldn't apply to Gentile dogs like me.

markedward
Dec 2nd 2009, 06:58 PM
Christ didn't say anything about the Passover meal as a whole. He ate broken bread saying "this is my body", he drank wine saying "this is my blood". He had his disciples share in the bread and wine, and he said "Do this in remembrance of me". He wasn't saying "keep the Passover in remembrance of me", he was saying to break the bread and drink the wine in remembrance of his sacrifice for the New Covenant.

Not to mention that the Corinthians (you know, "Gentile dogs") were keeping the communion under Paul's direction. Hence his exhortation about communion in his first letter to the Corinthians.

goykodesh
Dec 2nd 2009, 07:05 PM
I'd say it's treated as a command within Scripture. Christ did say, "Do this in remembrance of me."

This He said at a Passover seder. I will tell you what I get from this. No doubt, Jesus recounted the Exodus story that night, and gave many blessings to the Father. But this passover was different. It's too bad we don't get the full account, but from what I read, Jesus wove into the Exodus account the greater redemption to come. This time the firstfruits offering was the blood of the firstborn of God- God's Lamb. Like Isaac, He submitted to His Father and freely went to the alter of sacrifice. The Exodus from Egypt was a memorial to be sure, but how much more a memorial is the rememberence of our Redeemer, for both Jew and Gentile believers? Infinitely more. For all my life I will remember the moment of my own personal exodus from bondage. For the first time in my life, I was accepted just the way God made me. Accepted by the Most High. And not only that, I was lavished by even more - I was free from guilt, pardoned for my rebellious attitude, wiped clean from all the bitterness and anguish of trying to survive in a world that I neither understood, nor understood me. My exodus event itself was not a great shared moment with millions of others, but for me, it was the divider between life and death. He picked me up out of the mud and cleaned my soul. Why wouldn't I memorialize Him? I do so every moment. But on the day He spoke His covenant, on that Passover; that is a day to be memorialized, and when He said 'do this in rememberence of Me,' He is telling me to celebrate Passover with Him as the focus - to remember His redemption. I don't have a physical Egyptian captivity story, I am only grafted into that family - however He provided me with an amazing exodus story. To stop and commit 100% of that day to Him, to sit with my family and break (He would have broke matza) bread and bless Him, recount what He did for us. This is how I memorialize Him.

I'm not so good with the religious stuff and etiquette, but this is how I remember my Redeemer. It's an intensly personal experience for me. He knows my intent.

BroRog
Dec 2nd 2009, 07:13 PM
Christ didn't say anything about the Passover meal as a whole. He ate broken bread saying "this is my body", he drank wine saying "this is my blood". He had his disciples share in the bread and wine, and he said "Do this in remembrance of me". He wasn't saying "keep the Passover in remembrance of me", he was saying to break the bread and drink the wine in remembrance of his sacrifice for the New Covenant.

Not to mention that the Corinthians (you know, "Gentile dogs") were keeping the communion under Paul's direction. Hence his exhortation about communion in his first letter to the Corinthians.



And He said to them, "I have earnestly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer; for I say to you, I shall never again eat it until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God." And when He had taken a cup and given thanks, He said, "Take this and share it among yourselves; for I say to you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine from now on until the kingdom of God comes." And when He had taken bread and given thanks, He broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me." And in the same way the cup, after they had eaten, saying, "This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in My blood."

goykodesh
Dec 2nd 2009, 07:13 PM
Communion as described by Paul in 1 Cor 11 is a remberance of the suffering and sacrifice of our Lord for our redemption. A time of fellowship with the Lord.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

Yes, I guess I got some terminology confused. For me, this is a passover event.

markedward
Dec 2nd 2009, 07:22 PM
And He said to them, "I have earnestly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer; for I say to you, I shall never again eat it until it is fulfilled in the kingdom of God."
Considering that he was required to keep the Passover by the Law, I don't doubt his earnest desire that he would prefer to keep it with the people who loved him.

Your post in no way deals with the two points I raised:


Regarding the breaking of bread and the drinking of wine in relation to the New Covenant. In 1 Corinthians 10.16, Paul explicitly identifies the eating of the bread and the drinking of the wine as partaking in Christ's sacrifice. Between his descriptions of the communion in 1 Corinthians 10-11, he makes zero mention of the Passover feast, only the Christ's sacrifice for the New Covenant. (Christ is our Passover sacrifice, but neither Christ nor Paul state that Passover itself was the thing to be done "in remembrance", but instead the breaking of bread and drinking of wine. It seems incredibly unusual that in the one place Paul describes the communion, he doesn't mention Passover.)
Regarding how the Corinthians are Gentiles, and they clearly were taking part in the communion act. You claimed that Christ's command to "do this in remembrance of me" doesn't apply to the Gentiles, yet you ignore the plain fact that the first-century Gentile Christians saw that it did apply to them?

goykodesh
Dec 2nd 2009, 07:28 PM
Jesus said, "Do this (that is, eat the Passover meal) in remembrance of me." This wouldn't apply to Gentile dogs like me.

Not according ot the religion of men anyway. God has a different idea about that.

webhead
Dec 2nd 2009, 08:10 PM
So is washing of the saints feet, but very few groups follow that command/tradition!

It's because as Christians, we pick and chose the parts of the Bible that best fit our ideas of a good Christian walk. Thank you Jesus for your patience and grace and unrelenting love for your bride.

BroRog
Dec 2nd 2009, 08:35 PM
Considering that he was required to keep the Passover by the Law, I don't doubt his earnest desire that he would prefer to keep it with the people who loved him.

Your post in no way deals with the two points I raised:


Regarding the breaking of bread and the drinking of wine in relation to the New Covenant. In 1 Corinthians 10.16, Paul explicitly identifies the eating of the bread and the drinking of the wine as partaking in Christ's sacrifice. Between his descriptions of the communion in 1 Corinthians 10-11, he makes zero mention of the Passover feast, only the Christ's sacrifice for the New Covenant. (Christ is our Passover sacrifice, but neither Christ nor Paul state that Passover itself was the thing to be done "in remembrance", but instead the breaking of bread and drinking of wine. It seems incredibly unusual that in the one place Paul describes the communion, he doesn't mention Passover.)
Regarding how the Corinthians are Gentiles, and they clearly were taking part in the communion act. You claimed that Christ's command to "do this in remembrance of me" doesn't apply to the Gentiles, yet you ignore the plain fact that the first-century Gentile Christians saw that it did apply to them?



Your statement concerned what Jesus said to do, which must be informed by the circumstances that surrounded the event. Jesus' statement was given in the context of a Seder, which is a Jewish Passover meal. During that meal it was customary for the father of the family or someone else to give the midrash -- the commentary or interpretation of the symbols. There was not one set midrash, but the midrash varied among the various rabbii. Since Jesus was giving the midrash, he gave his own interpretation to the Sedar elements of the bread and the wine. And from then on, his Jewish disciples were to associate these elements with his body and blood.

Until Paul instituted the gathering together of a communal meal among the Corinthians, the Gentile Christians had no equivalent to the Passover meal. Gentiles are not obligated to memorialize the Exodus in the ritual Seder. The debate over the keeping of the Mosaic Law by the Gentiles established that the Gentiles were not obligated to keep Moses. And so the Gentiles are not obligated to celebrate the Seder, and had no occasion to "do this."

After Paul instituted the communal meal for the Corinthian church, he was able to talk about the bread and wine as a group activity for them as a church. And just as Jesus' midrash reinterpreted the Seder elements, Paul's communal meal also had the same elements and interpretation. However, what the communal meal lacked, which the Passover Sedar had was the imperative to keep it. While it is a commandment for Jews to keep the Passover, it was not a commandment that Gentile Christians celebrate the Lord's supper.



But in giving this instruction, I do not praise you, because you come together not for the better but for the worse. For, in the first place, when you come together as a church, I hear that divisions exist among you; and in part I believe it. For there must also be factions among you, so that those who are approved may become evident among you.
In this Paul shows his disapproval for coming together since they come together, "not for the better but for the worse." Had this been a commandment, he couldn't put it this way. If this were a commandment, and they were coming together as he commanded, he would praise them for being obedient to his command to come together, and correct the deficient technique.

Clydson
Dec 3rd 2009, 08:00 AM
Paul speaks about this, something about taking communion in a unworthy manner. Me and the wife smoke and are not 100% unrepentant in our sins
First, Paul is not speaking to taking communion with sin guilt, but rather partaking irreverently.

The Corinthians were so irreverent in their participation that they had turned the Lord's Supper into a common meal with prejudice. See 1 Cor 11:17-34.

Second, I know of no good reasoning for a child of God to enter into worship with sin-stained hands. Especially knowing that God forgives the repentant humble heart, James 4:6.

IsItLove?
Dec 3rd 2009, 09:50 AM
That's because a squirt of juice and crumb of bread has been the main diet of spiritual teaching unfortunately.
First this made me laugh.
Then it made me want to cry.

notuptome
Dec 3rd 2009, 05:35 PM
First this made me laugh.
Then it made me want to cry.
How must it appear to the Lord?

Will we endure sound doctrine?

For the cause of Christ
Roger

Heirphoto
Dec 3rd 2009, 08:55 PM
Our church, The Church Of The Brethren (anabaptist) blends both these concepts into our "remembrance", We have a short service in the chapel, we wash each others feet, we exchange a Holy Kiss, we share a simple meal together, then break bread between us and share a cup of wine. We do still call it Love Feast.

This is done twice each year, spring and fall. We remember the Last Supper as we do it, we serve each other with the foot washing, we have fellowship sharing the meal and then have communion. We "should" enter into this will a clean heart. If we have made transgressions we should pray and ask forgiveness first. If we have an issue with our brother or sister in Christ we should settle things first.

This is the high point of our year as Brethren, we think hard about what Christ did for us, we share our love with our Brethren. We should come to the communion table being the best we can be.

Tony Miller