PDA

View Full Version : Significance of these verses?



Redapple
Mar 1st 2010, 08:20 AM
Hi everybody :). Great site you have here. Ive been looking around for quite some time now and am finally gonna post cause i have a few questions on some verses. This is my first time getting acquainted with the bible so this is all very confusing to. Im supposed to find the significance in these verses. Could you possible tell me if im on the right track? Thanks in advance

4)”Get up, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt.”
The significance of this verse is that Jesus’ father Joseph prophecies that Herod is about to search for his child, to destroy him. This is significant because Jesus must live, and also because of the exile”. This is very similar to the exile of mosses who fleas Egypt as well.

10) The inscription Pilate places on Jesus’ cross. Irony because he was hebrew?



2. The transfiguration. The detail is that Jesus is a divine being and that his transfiguration puts him above mosses and Elijah. His dazzling white clothes (that no man could ever bleach so white) also indicate a heavenly, rather than an earthly being. This is significant because the miracle of Jesus appearing is unique because the miracle happens to Jesus himself, and supports his identity as the son of god?

3) “The first commandment of all”.



The first commandment of all emphasizes the sovereignty of god over all humanity. According to marks bible Jesus says it as an order that we take god into our hearts which in basically means that it is necessary in order to go to heaven instead of hell.

5) Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have not come to abolish but to fulfill.”


What Jesus is trying to saw by “Law and prophets” is the scriptures or the Old Testament. Jesus takes it upon himself to radically change and add onto some of the commandments that he felt were incomplete. In other words he is finishing the incomplete commandments or law that was begun in the Old Testament. The statement I have not come to abolish but to fulfill is just Jesus’ way heading off any misunderstanding.

Radagast
Mar 1st 2010, 08:56 AM
Hi everybody :). Great site you have here. Ive been looking around for quite some time now and am finally gonna post cause i have a few questions on some verses. This is my first time getting acquainted with the bible so this is all very confusing to. Im supposed to find the significance in these verses. Could you possible tell me if im on the right track? Thanks in advance

4)”Get up, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt.”
The significance of this verse is that Jesus’ father Joseph prophecies that Herod is about to search for his child, to destroy him. This is significant because Jesus must live, and also because of the exile”. This is very similar to the exile of mosses who fleas Egypt as well.

On the one hand, Egypt was a safe place (many Jews lived there); on the other hand, it sets up a prophecy (Matt 2:15 And so was fulfilled what the Lord had said through the prophet: "Out of Egypt I called my son.").


10) The inscription Pilate places on Jesus’ cross. Irony because he was hebrew?

It was in the three main local languages. As to JESUS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE JEWS, Pilate may have been mocking, but he also spoke truer than he realised.


2. The transfiguration. The detail is that Jesus is a divine being and that his transfiguration puts him above mosses and Elijah. His dazzling white clothes (that no man could ever bleach so white) also indicate a heavenly, rather than an earthly being. This is significant because the miracle of Jesus appearing is unique because the miracle happens to Jesus himself, and supports his identity as the son of god?

Also showing that the Moses and the Prophets witness to Jesus.


3) “The first commandment of all”. The first commandment of all emphasizes the sovereignty of god over all humanity. According to marks bible Jesus says it as an order that we take god into our hearts which in basically means that it is necessary in order to go to heaven instead of hell.

Jesus is saying that God comes first.


5) Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have not come to abolish but to fulfill.”
What Jesus is trying to saw by “Law and prophets” is the scriptures or the Old Testament. Jesus takes it upon himself to radically change and add onto some of the commandments that he felt were incomplete. In other words he is finishing the incomplete commandments or law that was begun in the Old Testament. The statement I have not come to abolish but to fulfill is just Jesus’ way heading off any misunderstanding.

Pretty much. Also that for some Old Testament things, like sacrifices, the main purpose was to point to Jesus. Now they are no longer needed.

roaring tiger
Mar 1st 2010, 09:54 AM
Hi!!!Redapple,

How are you?, and welcome to the board.

Radagast reply is correct and I'll just add verse some in # 2 please read Acts. 10:43 to him give all the prophets witness, that through his namewhosoever believeth in him

shall receive remission of sin.

#2 The first commandment is to love the Lord thy God and serve him with perfect heart and with a willing mind, for the Lord searcheth all hearts, and understand

all imagination of the thoughts: if thou seek him, he will be found of thee, but if thou forsake him, he will cast thee off forever.

Eph. 6:1-2 Children, obey your parents in the Lord: for this is right.

v.2]Honour thy father and mother:[ which is the first commandment with promise:]

Thanks and God bless./RT.
Hi!!!Radagast'

I agree with your quote, thanks RT.




On the one hand, Egypt was a safe place (many Jews lived there); on the other hand, it sets up a prophecy (Matt 2:15 And so was fulfilled what the Lord had said through the prophet: "Out of Egypt I called my son.").



It was in the three main local languages. As to JESUS OF NAZARETH, THE KING OF THE JEWS, Pilate may have been mocking, but he also spoke truer than he realised.



Also showing that the Moses and the Prophets witness to Jesus.



Jesus is saying that God comes first.



Pretty much. Also that for some Old Testament things, like sacrifices, the main purpose was to point to Jesus. Now they are no longer needed.

goykodesh
Mar 1st 2010, 07:20 PM
Hi everybody :). Great site you have here. Ive been looking around for quite some time now and am finally gonna post cause i have a few questions on some verses. This is my first time getting acquainted with the bible so this is all very confusing to. Im supposed to find the significance in these verses. Could you possible tell me if im on the right track? Thanks in advance

Hi!! First, no one is ever on the wrong track if they are inquiring something of God's Word. None of us will get it 'right,' all of it right. I beleive God's intent for our earthly lives is for us to get to know Him, and to establish a relationship with Him. We ask many things of each other, our opinion, etc., but don't forget after all the human interaction to ask the Most High.


4)”Get up, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt.”
The significance of this verse is that Jesus’ father Joseph prophecies that Herod is about to search for his child, to destroy him. This is significant because Jesus must live, and also because of the exile”. This is very similar to the exile of mosses who fleas Egypt as well.

At first, Egypt was host to the sons of Jacob. A safe haven in a time of famine. It is also prophecied.



10) The inscription Pilate places on Jesus’ cross. Irony because he was hebrew?

In what way? I think the intent was Roman mockery. Ironically true though......



2. The transfiguration. The detail is that Jesus is a divine being and that his transfiguration puts him above mosses and Elijah. His dazzling white clothes (that no man could ever bleach so white) also indicate a heavenly, rather than an earthly being. This is significant because the miracle of Jesus appearing is unique because the miracle happens to Jesus himself, and supports his identity as the son of god?

The thing about this event that impresses me the most is when God the Father says "This is my Son. Listen to Him." Now this would have been 'spoken' in Hebrew. The word for listen in Hebrew is "shema." It means more than just 'listen.' It means "hear and obey." Hebrew verbs always include actions. Go read Deut 18:15. Do you think this is what God has in mind here?



3) “The first commandment of all”.


The first commandment of all emphasizes the sovereignty of god over all humanity. According to marks bible Jesus says it as an order that we take god into our hearts which in basically means that it is necessary in order to go to heaven instead of hell.

Any king must establish his soverignty before he asserts his power. By the way, Deuteronomy 6 - Hear (Shema) Israel. The LORD is God, the LORD is one. And you shall love the LORD God with all your hearts, with all your mind and with all your strength....." and it is also written "put these commandments which the LORD God has given you today on your hearts....."

Yes, it has always been a heart issue, and always will be.


5) Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have not come to abolish but to fulfill.”

What Jesus is trying to saw by “Law and prophets” is the scriptures or the Old Testament. Jesus takes it upon himself to radically change and add onto some of the commandments that he felt were incomplete. In other words he is finishing the incomplete commandments or law that was begun in the Old Testament. The statement I have not come to abolish but to fulfill is just Jesus’ way heading off any misunderstanding.

hmmm... well there were a few sects in Judaism in Jesus' time, and they were constantly accusing each other of 'annulling the Torah' when they disagreed. I'm sure Jesus faced the same accusations as He was questioned in the Gospels by the two largest sects, the house of Shammai and the house of Hillel, usually so one sect could 'gang up' on the other, or make a point. Remember, in the early part of the Gospels, Jesus is described as a stunning student of Torah, and no doubt, His wisdom was tapped be many. Yes, He filled up the Torah, meanine He was blameless and did not transgress neither the command, nor the intent of the command. The intent is important here, because the "oral Torah" was held as an 'interpretation' of the Law orally handed down through Moses. But it was just not so. After the Babylonian exile, it was clear the Jews had lost provisions of even the written (God's) Torah (read Ezra). The problem with any religion can be that the focus can be shifted from relationship with God to relationship with the doings and goings on of religion. Once that link is broken, we get all wound up in ourselves and we end up serving ourselves and our religious leaders. Jesus taught us heaviness, or the weight of God's intent with His commandments was to focus on Him and each other. Obeying his commands spring out of love, trust and obedience to Him, not out of obeying the rules of some religious leader who appears to be holy.