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Frecs
Mar 4th 2010, 08:42 PM
In conjunction with my degree studies in nutrition, Iíve been studying herbalogy and, to a lesser extent, aromatherapy. During a google search for suppliers of essential oils, I found several websites purporting to be Christian selling Sacred Anointing Oil using the formula contained in Exodus chapter 30:

1 part [essential oil of] myrrh
Ĺ part [essential oil of] cinnamon
Ĺ part [essential oil of] fragrant cane
1 part [essential oil of] cassia
hin of olive oil

I found this to be quite surprising considering the strong language of that chapter. According to Exodus 30, this particular blend of essential oils was to be considered sacred. One website referenced the Essene Gospels as justification. Since those are not canon by a LONG shot, I can not and will not use them as a justification for the use of this sacred blend of oils. But, it did get me wonderingÖ

1. Since we are now the Royal Priesthood, is it okay to anoint using this formula?
2. More broadly, when NT passages speak of anointing someone (either for blessing or healing) was it strictly olive oil being used or were they using other oils/balms? If the latter, was the particular oil used determined by itís healing abilities or attributes or fragrance or????
3. Exodus 30 also mentions an incense to be burned in the temple. It was also considered sacred. Would the same reasoning for your answer of question #1 apply here?
4. Incense in general: thoughts as to itís biblical application?

Iím curious to see what you think. I keep going round and round and havenít quite resolved the issue in my head/heart/spirit. Perhaps through a discussion on the forum I can formulate a satisfactory conclusion.

Your Sister in Christ,

Frecs

Crosstalk
Mar 5th 2010, 01:21 AM
I thought that the Scripture was clear that it was not to touch human flesh. So I would say that you can't make this anointing oil.
And why would you need an anointing oil anyway?

Frecs
Mar 5th 2010, 02:36 AM
I thought that the Scripture was clear that it was not to touch human flesh. So I would say that you can't make this anointing oil.
And why would you need an anointing oil anyway?

Actually, it was to be used to anoint Aaron and his sons for the priesthood. It was also used to anoint the tabernacle and the furniture and tools used in the tabernacle. It was not to be used to anoint any other person.

As for your question of "why": I know that mainstream Christian churches don't generally use anointing oil and certain anointing oil is not a necessity. But, it is quite common in Pentacostal circles. While there are far more references to the practice in the OT scriptures, it is a common practice even during Jesus's lifetime and in the early church. When Jesus sent out the 12 to minister to the people, it is recorded in Mark 6:13 that they anointed the sick with oil and the sick were healed. James 5:14-16 instructs sick believers to call on the elders of the church and be anointed with oil and prayed over.

Luke 10:34 indicates that the use of oil (essential oils?) as a healing agent was common...it and other uses of medicinal herbs were quite likely the tools of the physicians and every Jewish mother. :idea:

Modern views of the use of anointing oils during the time of the early church is that it was olive oil and more symbolic than medicinal. Certainly, today's use is totally symbolic (general either olive oil or any vegetable oil is used)(Zechariah 4:4-6). We know that the healing that occurs after the laying on of hands, anointing with oil, and prayer is the work of the Holy Spirit, not the oil (Acts 10:38). Though, the HS does not require either the laying on of hands or the use of anointing oil to do His work! It is more directly affecting the building of the faith of the one needing healing (or those around that person).

I carry vials of anointing oil to anoint others or myself. More recently, I've also felt led to anoint my hands before raising them in worship. I would never have considered the use of a blend of the Sacred Anointing Oil because of the strong wording in Exodus. It was seeing those website and then considering that we are a Royal Priesthood that caused me to wonder. We are also the temple of the Holy Spirit. So, one could argue that as a Priest and the Temple, we could/should be anointed with the Sacred Anointing Oil. But, the immediate answer that comes to mind is that we ARE anointed, by the blood of the lamb and the baptism of the Holy Spirit. So, we don't NEED to be anointed for service...but, is there danger for those who used that blend? Is the warning still valid under the New Covenant?

Like I said, I've gone back and forth regarding the Sacred Anointing Oil and thought the good folks on this forum might help me think it through and become more certain in my heart about the matter.

Your Sister in Christ,

Frecs

goykodesh
Mar 5th 2010, 08:04 PM
Since there is no longer a Tabernacle or Levitical priests, there is no purpose for "annointed oil."

Jesus is our all. Nothing can be added to His works.

The Mighty Sword
Mar 5th 2010, 08:19 PM
The New Testament actually doesn't tell us very much about anointing with oil. Mark 6:13 says that the disciples "anointed many sick people with oil and healed them," but that was before Jesus' death and resurrection. The only mention of anointing with oil after the cross is in James 5:14:
"Is any one of you sick? He should call the elders of the church to pray over him and anoint him with oil in the name of the Lord." (James 5:14)
In both of those verses (Mark 6:13 and James 5:14), the Greek word for "anoint" is aleipho, which means: to rub, to cover over, besmear , But is doesn't not to annoint with oil.


"But when you fast, put oil on [aleipho] your head and wash your face" (Matthew 6:17)

"When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint [aleipho] Jesus' body." (Mark 16:1)

"and as she stood behind him at his feet weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them and poured [aleipho] perfume on them." (Luke 7:38)

"You did not put oil on my head, but she has poured [aleipho] perfume on my feet." (Luke 7:46)

"This Mary, whose brother Lazarus now lay sick, was the same one who poured [aleipho] perfume on the Lord and wiped his feet with her hair." (John 11:2)

"Then Mary took about a pint of pure nard, an expensive perfume; she poured [aleipho] it on Jesus' feet and wiped his feet with her hair. And the house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume." (John 12:3)
These are all of the places in the New Testament where the Greek word aleipho is used.

The main Greek word for the "sacred" type of anointing (in which the Holy Spirit is involved) is chrio, which is never used in connection with healing. Here are all of the places in the New Testament where this Greek word is used:

"The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed [chrio] me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed" (Luke 4:18)

"Indeed Herod and Pontius Pilate met together with the Gentiles and the people of Israel in this city to conspire against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed [chrio]." (Acts 4:27)

"how God anointed [chrio] Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power, and how he went around doing good and healing all who were under the power of the devil, because God was with him." (Acts 10:38)

"Now it is God who makes both us and you stand firm in Christ. He anointed [chrio] us" (2 Corinthians 1:21)

"You have loved righteousness and hated wickedness; therefore God, your God, has set you above your companions by anointing [chrio] you with the oil of joy." (Hebrews 1:9)
Notice that this Greek word for the "sacred" type of anointing is never used in connection with healing.

A similar Greek word is chrisma, which means "anointing." Here are all of the places in the New Testament where this Greek word is used:

"But you have an anointing [chrisma] from the Holy One, and all of you know the truth." (1 John 2:20)

If GOD condoned annointing as when he told Samuel to annoint the boy (King) david, then it still stands true today GODs Word never changes.

goykodesh
Mar 5th 2010, 08:47 PM
Good post, Mighty Chereb. I hope that clears up any inclination to "send in a love gift" for a 0.0000000005 oz beaker of river water from the Jordan

The Mighty Sword
Mar 5th 2010, 09:17 PM
Good post, Mighty Chereb. I hope that clears up any inclination to "send in a love gift" for a 0.0000000005 oz beaker of river water from the Jordan

Do you have any??? :lol:

goykodesh
Mar 5th 2010, 09:19 PM
Do you have any??? :lol:

Um...no. But I will send you a whole gallon of Colorado river water for a lot less. keep in mind, what is left is a remnant of the great flood that carved the Grand Canyon.........

The Mighty Sword
Mar 5th 2010, 09:21 PM
Um...no. But I will send you a whole gallon of Colorado river water for a lot less. keep in mind, what is left is a remnant of the great flood that carved the Grand Canyon.........

That's great cuz we're having a water shortage here in Cali so send all you can.

goykodesh
Mar 5th 2010, 09:24 PM
That's great cuz we're having a water shortage here in Cali so send all you can.

I also have a few jars of Mt. Saint Helen's ash. For a double love gift, I will include a sackcloth....

The Mighty Sword
Mar 5th 2010, 09:30 PM
I also have a few jars of Mt. Saint Helen's ash. For a double love gift, I will include a sackcloth....

I'll use the ash in case someone says something I don't like and douce myself in it, or when I fast I'll rub it on my face to look like I'm plagued by hunger, you know like the good ol'e days. :lol:

ClayInHisHands
Mar 5th 2010, 09:51 PM
I also have a few jars of Mt. Saint Helen's ash. For a double love gift, I will include a sackcloth....

Does these jars have a picture of yourself on it, that's the only way I could reason sending my money.....:lol:

Frecs
Mar 5th 2010, 10:35 PM
Hi Mighty Sword,

That was a great post, thanks for the information on the different Greek words for anointing. That gives me more to meditate on in regards to the use of oil in both worship and in conjunction with the prayer for healing of the sick....

Frecs
Mar 5th 2010, 10:44 PM
Good post, Mighty Chereb. I hope that clears up any inclination to "send in a love gift" for a 0.0000000005 oz beaker of river water from the Jordan

:rofl:

There is actually a guy in my church who insists on paying for "Oil from Jerusalem" as if it is somehow more "holy" than any other olive oil (with or without essential oil--though he prefers spikenard). I tried to engage him in a discussion of the matter but he wasn't open to a two way conversation (he likes the sound of his own voice).

The original reason I even started thinking about this stuff is that I was curious about the use of medicinal essential oils during biblical times as well. That and the common practice in pentacostal circles of using anointing oil when praying for folks.... and well...you see the rabbit trail started and I was off....My mind tends to favor following rabbit trails at times...if this then what about... :hmm: