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View Full Version : Matthew 5:37



truthseeker2
Mar 28th 2010, 04:30 AM
Let your yes be yes.

What do you think about telling someone you will be somewhere, then finding out that there is something else you would much rather go to instead at the same time?

Is it just fine to cancel on them to go to the other event?

I'm sure lots of people on this forum have done it but does that make it ok? I understand there are sometimes emergencies of course.

Butch5
Mar 28th 2010, 12:31 PM
Let your yes be yes.

What do you think about telling someone you will be somewhere, then finding out that there is something else you would much rather go to instead at the same time?

Is it just fine to cancel on them to go to the other event?

I'm sure lots of people on this forum have done it but does that make it ok? I understand there are sometimes emergencies of course.


Let your yes be yes.

truthseeker2
Mar 31st 2010, 04:53 PM
I find it a bit curious that no one else has responded to this. Is it perhaps an uncomfortable subject that almost everyone wants to avoid?

Slug1
Mar 31st 2010, 05:00 PM
I've done it... didn't make it right.

Did you make an oath? An oath was like a contract... does saying, "Sure, I'll come over to your house Saturday night" make an oath/contract?

Next time, I know to add... "if nothing pops up between now and then that may be more important... what kind of snacks should I bring if I can make it?"

crawfish
Mar 31st 2010, 05:17 PM
Essentially, the passage says "don't make promises that you don't intend or may be unable to keep". People tend to invoke things to make others accept their promises - for example "I swear by heaven above that I will repay you next month". Unscrupulous people might use these types of promises to people for whom they mean something to get away with bad behavior.

notuptome
Mar 31st 2010, 05:37 PM
Let your communication be yea, yea; Nay, nay; for whatever is more than these cometh of evil. Mat 5:7

Speak the truth. Do not embellish. Do not swear falsely.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

Dravenhawk
Apr 1st 2010, 02:50 AM
I would be a bald faced liar if I said I havent boned out on an engagement. I try to call the person as soon as I know I can't make it. Most times I keep my arrangements. Such a simple command and I blow it. Thank you Jesus for grace. Its about pride and being embarassed when I bone out on a simple yes / no promise.

On the receiving end I hate it when somebody bones out on me. I had this friend and we would make plans to go fishin or watch football and when we were to meet up he just didn't show. I know how crappy I feel when I receive it so I make every effort to keep my word when it comes to an agreement and to forgive when someone bones out on me.

Dravenhawk

subarctic_guy
Apr 1st 2010, 08:34 AM
what i got from this verse is that you shouldn't need to make promises because you are known to keep your word at all times. if i agree to meet someone and want to get out of it, i just ask if they want to reschedule.

ThyWordIsTruth
Apr 2nd 2010, 11:55 PM
Let your yes be yes.

What do you think about telling someone you will be somewhere, then finding out that there is something else you would much rather go to instead at the same time?

Is it just fine to cancel on them to go to the other event?

I'm sure lots of people on this forum have done it but does that make it ok? I understand there are sometimes emergencies of course.

I don't think you should cancel on them to go to the other event just because it is something else that *you* would much rather do.

Remember, "Love your neighbour as yourself." How would it make you feel if people did this to you regularly?

1) This kind of decision is driven by selfishness. Of what *I* prefer doing. You've given your word, the other person took your word and made adjustments in his schedule to go out with you. When you just cancel to go do something else, you leave them hanging. That is selfish and inconsiderate.

2) You don't know what kind of preperations the other person had to go through to honour this engagement. Or how they might have looked forward to it. You might hurt feelings when you do this for some frivilous, non-emergency reason.

3) There is no honour to your word anymore if you do this often. Nobody will trust you, and you'll be known as a person who makes promises and never keeps them. Firstly that surely does not glorify God, secondly you'll soon start losing your friends. Those that care enough to be hurt by your actions anyway.

There is a general principle to be learned from this Psalm:
Psa 15:1 A Psalm of David. O LORD, who shall sojourn in your tent? Who shall dwell on your holy hill?
Psa 15:2 He who walks blamelessly and does what is right and speaks truth in his heart;
Psa 15:3 who does not slander with his tongue and does no evil to his neighbor, nor takes up a reproach against his friend;
Psa 15:4 in whose eyes a vile person is despised, but who honors those who fear the LORD; who swears to his own hurt and does not change;
Psa 15:5 who does not put out his money at interest and does not take a bribe against the innocent. He who does these things shall never be moved.

The part I've highlighted means that when a righteous man makes a promise to someone, he will go to such lengths to honour what he has promised even if it meant his own hurt (financial, etc.)

Butch5
Apr 3rd 2010, 11:23 AM
I don't think you should cancel on them to go to the other event just because it is something else that *you* would much rather do.

Remember, "Love your neighbour as yourself." How would it make you feel if people did this to you regularly?

1) This kind of decision is driven by selfishness. Of what *I* prefer doing. You've given your word, the other person took your word and made adjustments in his schedule to go out with you. When you just cancel to go do something else, you leave them hanging. That is selfish and inconsiderate.

2) You don't know what kind of preperations the other person had to go through to honour this engagement. Or how they might have looked forward to it. You might hurt feelings when you do this for some frivilous, non-emergency reason.

3) There is no honour to your word anymore if you do this often. Nobody will trust you, and you'll be known as a person who makes promises and never keeps them. Firstly that surely does not glorify God, secondly you'll soon start losing your friends. Those that care enough to be hurt by your actions anyway.

There is a general principle to be learned from this Psalm:
Psa 15:1 A Psalm of David. O LORD, who shall sojourn in your tent? Who shall dwell on your holy hill?
Psa 15:2 He who walks blamelessly and does what is right and speaks truth in his heart;
Psa 15:3 who does not slander with his tongue and does no evil to his neighbor, nor takes up a reproach against his friend;
Psa 15:4 in whose eyes a vile person is despised, but who honors those who fear the LORD; who swears to his own hurt and does not change;
Psa 15:5 who does not put out his money at interest and does not take a bribe against the innocent. He who does these things shall never be moved.

The part I've highlighted means that when a righteous man makes a promise to someone, he will go to such lengths to honour what he has promised even if it meant his own hurt (financial, etc.)

Well said my friend, well said.

It seems that at the time of Christ, because man were unscrupulous there was a practice of swearing oath to make sure of ones honesty. The Jews, because they feared God would apparently be asked to swear on the temple, the thinking is that they so feared God that if they swore on the temple they would not lie. Jesus, however, told His followers not to do this, just let your yes be yes and your no be no.