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GreekAsianPanda
Apr 19th 2010, 11:58 PM
"But one of the soldiers pierced his side with a spear, and at once there came out blood and water." ---John 19:34, ESV

I was just wondering ... Should this be taken literally? After all, John says in his letter, in a non-literal way:

"This is the one who came by water and blood - Jesus Christ. He did not come by water only, but by water and blood." ---1 John 5:6, ESV

So was Yeshua actually stabbed with a spear?

markedward
Apr 20th 2010, 12:06 AM
John 19.34 refers to blood and water pouring out of Jesus' body when, yes, he was stabbed with a spear.

1 John 5.6 is not referring to the same thing; the "water" that 1 John 5.6 refers to was the water baptism of Jesus, and the "blood" was the death of Jesus on the cross.

Beckrl
Apr 20th 2010, 12:49 AM
Yes, He was pierced his side with a spear, John noted that water and blood came forth because he wanted to shown that Jesus was a man, the incarnation. John 1:14 That the Word was made flesh.

Radagast
Apr 20th 2010, 01:04 AM
"But one of the soldiers pierced his side with a spear, and at once there came out blood and water." ---John 19:34, ESV

I was just wondering ... Should this be taken literally?

Yes. John is including this deail to show that Jesus was really dead: that his blood had started to clot (so that the red blood cells had started to separate out from the watery-looking blood liquid). I guess this is why the soldier did it: as a quick test for whether Jesus was really dead or simply unconscious. Soldiers are pretty good at knowing when people are really dead.

You can read symbolism into this, and John is also pointing out fulfilled prophecy, but the key thing is that John was there and saw that Jesus was really dead, which is why he says in verse 35: The man who saw it has given testimony, and his testimony is true. He knows that he tells the truth, and he testifies so that you also may believe.

ThyWordIsTruth
Apr 20th 2010, 03:05 PM
"But one of the soldiers pierced his side with a spear, and at once there came out blood and water." ---John 19:34, ESV

I was just wondering ... Should this be taken literally? After all, John says in his letter, in a non-literal way:

So was Yeshua actually stabbed with a spear?

I've done some research on this (the piercing of the spear) and I think it is meant to be taken literally.

The human heart is encased by a sac called the pericardium sac containing quite a lot of lubricating fluid. This fluid acts to cool the heart muscles and prevent friction as the heart pumps. I believe the Holy Spirit led the apostles and Luke the physician to record this in the Gospels so as to remove all doubt whatsoever that Jesus indeed had his heart pierced by the spear, so that the pericardium sac was torn and both blood and water (from the pericardium sac) flowed out of his wounds.

They wouldn't have known this at the time of writing, only as advances in medical science was made do we now know this.

I think this is to prevent whatever speculations people make that Christ did not die, that he feigned his death or he fainted or whatever else people can think of to discredit the Lord's death on the cross. The record of the blood and water flowing out leaves no doubt at all that his heart was pierced and there was no way for anyone to survive such a condition.

Radagast
Apr 20th 2010, 03:24 PM
They wouldn't have known this at the time of writing, only as advances in medical science was made do we now know this.

I think it's fair to say that experienced Roman soldiers knew a LOT about what happened when you poked spears into people. That's what they did for a living.

As I said, I think "blood and water" is more likely to refer to partially clotted blood than to anything else. But the main point is that the soldier was checking "is this man really dead" and was satisfied by his test.