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moonglow
Nov 19th 2010, 06:45 PM
Soooo what is your take on this:

Job 39:9-12 (King James Version)

9 Will the unicorn be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?

10 Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?

11 Wilt thou trust him, because his strength is great? or wilt thou leave thy labour to him?

12 Wilt thou believe him, that he will bring home thy seed, and gather it into thy barn?

Psalm 29:6 (King James Version)

6He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young unicorn.

Isaiah 34:7 (King James Version)

7 And the unicorns shall come down with them, and the bullocks with the bulls; and their land shall be soaked with blood, and their dust made fat with fatness.

From Answers in Genesis: (http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/aid/v2/n1/unicorns-in-bible)

However, the linguistics of the text cannot conclusively prove how many horns the biblical unicorn had. While modern translations typically translate re’em as “wild ox,” the King James Version (1611), Luther’s German Bible (1534), the Septuagint, and the Latin Vulgate translated this Hebrew word with words meaning “one-horned animal.” 13

The importance of the biblical unicorn is not so much its specific identity—much as we would like to know—but its reality. The Bible is clearly describing a real animal. The unicorn mentioned in the Bible was a powerful animal possessing one or two strong horns—not the fantasy animal that has been popularized in movies and books. Whatever it was, it is now likely extinct like many other animals. To think of the biblical unicorn as a fantasy animal is to demean God’s Word, which is true in every detail.

In the New King James version it calls them wild oxen:

Isaiah 34:7 (New King James Version)

7 The wild oxen shall come down with them,
And the young bulls with the mighty bulls;
Their land shall be soaked with blood,
And their dust saturated with fatness.”

Job 39:9-12 (New King James Version)

9 “Will the wild ox be willing to serve you?
Will he bed by your manger?

10 Can you bind the wild ox in the furrow with ropes?
Or will he plow the valleys behind you?

11 Will you trust him because his strength is great?
Or will you leave your labor to him?

12 Will you trust him to bring home your grain,
And gather it to your threshing floor?

Psalm 29:6 (New King James Version)

6 He makes them also skip like a calf,
Lebanon and Sirion like a young wild ox.

So what do you think?

God bless

teddyv
Nov 19th 2010, 07:34 PM
I'd probably defer to the scholars on this, not that it's something I lose sleep over. If it truly was a one horned animal, possibly a rhino? But I don't know if rhinos ever populated that part of the world.

crawfish
Nov 19th 2010, 07:40 PM
Maybe it's a narwhal. :)

teddyv
Nov 19th 2010, 07:59 PM
Maybe it's a narwhal. :)

Before they returned to the sea? :)

(Great, now I have the Narwhal song from Weebl in my head.)

moonglow
Nov 19th 2010, 08:03 PM
Maybe it's a narwhal. :)

Yea when they still had legs that is...:hmm::lol:

God bless

Lady e
Nov 19th 2010, 11:12 PM
Who knows all the things GOD has created?What about the leviathon?I like to say if GOD says there are unicorns,then there are unicorns-nothing is impossible with GOD.

nzyr
Nov 20th 2010, 03:24 AM
It may be the aurochs. Which is believed to be the wild ancestors of our domestic cattle. They were larger and wilder than the domestic cattle of today. Or maybe it's the rhinoceros.

http://users.aristotle.net/~swarmack/hodgraph/aurochs2.GIF

http://images3.makefive.com/images/debate/environment/most-endangered-species/black-rhinoceros-7.jpg

4Gsake
Nov 20th 2010, 03:45 AM
Another metaphore perhaps :hmm:

There seem to be quite a few in the Bible.:)

GitRDunn
Nov 20th 2010, 10:08 PM
Soooo what is your take on this:

Job 39:9-12 (King James Version)

9 Will the unicorn be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib?

10 Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow? or will he harrow the valleys after thee?

11 Wilt thou trust him, because his strength is great? or wilt thou leave thy labour to him?

12 Wilt thou believe him, that he will bring home thy seed, and gather it into thy barn?

Psalm 29:6 (King James Version)

6He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young unicorn.

Isaiah 34:7 (King James Version)

7 And the unicorns shall come down with them, and the bullocks with the bulls; and their land shall be soaked with blood, and their dust made fat with fatness.

From Answers in Genesis: (http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/aid/v2/n1/unicorns-in-bible)

However, the linguistics of the text cannot conclusively prove how many horns the biblical unicorn had. While modern translations typically translate re’em as “wild ox,” the King James Version (1611), Luther’s German Bible (1534), the Septuagint, and the Latin Vulgate translated this Hebrew word with words meaning “one-horned animal.” 13

The importance of the biblical unicorn is not so much its specific identity—much as we would like to know—but its reality. The Bible is clearly describing a real animal. The unicorn mentioned in the Bible was a powerful animal possessing one or two strong horns—not the fantasy animal that has been popularized in movies and books. Whatever it was, it is now likely extinct like many other animals. To think of the biblical unicorn as a fantasy animal is to demean God’s Word, which is true in every detail.

In the New King James version it calls them wild oxen:

Isaiah 34:7 (New King James Version)

7 The wild oxen shall come down with them,
And the young bulls with the mighty bulls;
Their land shall be soaked with blood,
And their dust saturated with fatness.”

Job 39:9-12 (New King James Version)

9 “Will the wild ox be willing to serve you?
Will he bed by your manger?

10 Can you bind the wild ox in the furrow with ropes?
Or will he plow the valleys behind you?

11 Will you trust him because his strength is great?
Or will you leave your labor to him?

12 Will you trust him to bring home your grain,
And gather it to your threshing floor?

Psalm 29:6 (New King James Version)

6 He makes them also skip like a calf,
Lebanon and Sirion like a young wild ox.

So what do you think?

God bless
I don't know for sure, but perhaps it is something to do with translation? The other possibilities as I see it are either that it is not meant to be a literal unicorn or it could be referencing the animal that is believed to be the source of many unicorn myths. The origin of the myths is believed to be, at least partly, due to deer with just a single horn in the center of their heads (here is a link (http://www.physorg.com/news132406601.html) to a story with a picture of one)

Fenris
Nov 23rd 2010, 01:59 PM
All my translations show "Re'im" as "wild ox".

tango
Nov 23rd 2010, 02:39 PM
The long lost verses... (with apologies to Gary Larson)

Gen 7:25-28 And Noah didst descend into the midst of the animals, and there he didst find the remains of the unicorns. (26) And Noah didst beat upon his breast at the demise of these beautiful creatures, yea, (27) and Noah didst thereafter confine all carnivores to C deck. (28) And with great mourning didst Noah dump the remains of the unicorns over the side.

moonglow
Nov 23rd 2010, 02:46 PM
The long lost verses... (with apologies to Gary Larson)

Gen 7:25-28 And Noah didst descend into the midst of the animals, and there he didst find the remains of the unicorns. (26) And Noah didst beat upon his breast at the demise of these beautiful creatures, yea, (27) and Noah didst thereafter confine all carnivores to C deck. (28) And with great mourning didst Noah dump the remains of the unicorns over the side.

It must be true cause there is a song even about it...:lol:

_EPsuOEH1fY

My sister and I use to listen to this song over and over when we were kids and were convicted it was true...;)

ignis
Nov 24th 2010, 07:19 PM
All my translations show "Re'im" as "wild ox".

Yep.

And the ancient Arabic translation is Antelope.

Fenris
Nov 24th 2010, 07:34 PM
Yep.

And the ancient Arabic translation is Antelope.

I did not know that. very interesting.

Reynolds357
Nov 24th 2010, 07:35 PM
I really do not find it hard to believe that unicorns existed at one time.

ignis
Nov 24th 2010, 07:43 PM
I really do not find it hard to believe that unicorns existed at one time.

:hmm: Maybe some day one of their fossilized skeletons will be excavated?

:D But I wouldn't hold my breath over it.

Zack702
Nov 27th 2010, 07:52 AM
I was just thinking based on the description it could be a Rhino / Rhinosaurus.

However there have been deer born with one straight horn, just like a unicorn.

notuptome
Nov 27th 2010, 03:03 PM
Strongs 07214 rehame probably the great aurochs or wild bulls which are now extinct. The exact meaning is unknown. When I looked at the root word raam it is translated lifted up describing the quality to rise.

Sounds like a majestic animal or the majestic quality in an animal. I feel comfortable that it did not represent anything like our modern vision of the animal of mythology. And no glitter was used in the construction of this vision.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

moonglow
Nov 27th 2010, 04:28 PM
I think we need to get rid of the idea of the fantasy unicorn someone dreamed up one time...that would help greatly in figuring out what it was.


God bless