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Equipped_4_Love
Jan 30th 2011, 09:25 PM
Hey, all;

I have been studying for some time how the pre-flood Noahic civilization compares to the present civilization, and I am hoping to get a discussion going on this.

P.S. Let's PLEASE try to stay away from any debates on the Nephilim and the identity of the Sons of God, as I know there are differing interpretations of that passage. I know what I believe about it, but I would rather like to JUST focus on the behavior and condition of the people at that time.

BroRog
Jan 30th 2011, 11:18 PM
Here is one passage where Jesus talks about the days of Noah.



For the coming of the Son of Man will be just like the days of Noah. For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark, and they did not understand until the flood came and took them all away; so will the coming of the Son of Man be. Matthew 24:37-39

Since God says that he will bring a flood on mankind because he "saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually", many Bible teachers and commentaries focus on how evil the times were back then, and suggest that when Jesus returns, the world will be just as evil or worse. This may be true, but this isn't the focus of Jesus' point in Matthew 24:37-39. Notice that Jesus, himself, tells us how it will be. People will be eating and drinking, and marrying and giving in marriage. In other words, life will be pretty much normal.

In Noah's day, Noah was building an ark, and preaching about the coming flood. The people, however, were going about life as if nothing was going to happen. Noah was preaching the coming judgment, and people were going about their business as if nothing was going to happen. People weren't building their own boats, they weren't hiking to the tallest mountain, they weren't praying to God in repentance and asking for mercy to save their lives. They walked around as if oblivious to the coming judgment. And Jesus is trying to say that when he returns, people will have the same attitude as those who perished in the flood.

When Jesus returns, people will be going about their business during a normal day, acting as if things will continue as they have been for thousands of years. Nothing ever changes, people continue to have weddings and funerals and go to work and come home and get up and do it again, amen.

Equipped_4_Love
Jan 31st 2011, 12:04 AM
Interesting passage is also Luke 12:45,46. It says that the wicked servant will say that Christ has delayed his coming, and will eat and drink and beat the fellow servants. Eating and drinking -- that is what the Matthew passage says that people will be occupied with before Christ comes again.

Seems that even some people in the church will fall privy to this lacsadaisical attitude.

The most interesting thing I find in the Genesis passage is what God says about them -- that they are "merely flesh." This seems to indicate that mankind reached a point where they had absolutely no spiritual inclination whatsoever, and it was all about living to satisly their lusts and fleshly desires. Also, there was a lot of oppression. Indeed, God says that His spirit would no longer strive with man. God does tell us that man can reach a point of such spiritual oblivion that His Spirit will cease its work of reproval and regeneration in them.

divaD
Jan 31st 2011, 08:26 PM
Interesting passage is also Luke 12:45,46. It says that the wicked servant will say that Christ has delayed his coming, and will eat and drink and beat the fellow servants. Eating and drinking -- that is what the Matthew passage says that people will be occupied with before Christ comes again.

Seems that even some people in the church will fall privy to this lacsadaisical attitude.

The most interesting thing I find in the Genesis passage is what God says about them -- that they are "merely flesh." This seems to indicate that mankind reached a point where they had absolutely no spiritual inclination whatsoever, and it was all about living to satisly their lusts and fleshly desires. Also, there was a lot of oppression. Indeed, God says that His spirit would no longer strive with man. God does tell us that man can reach a point of such spiritual oblivion that His Spirit will cease its work of reproval and regeneration in them.



Let me ask this, since I'm not entirely sure to what depth you want to discuss this topic. But since most take the flood of Noah's day to have been literal, mankind being wiped out in a flood, does that mean that we also have to conclude that God is literally going to set this planet ablaze when He returns, occupants and all? If He destroyed mankind via a flood in the past, why do it different this time, with literal fire? I believe the Bible teaches that there will be parts of the earth ablaze, but the entire planet tho? Somehow I just don't believe that should be understood literally, as far as the entire planet is concerned, even tho I believe the flood should be.

divaD
Jan 31st 2011, 08:27 PM
Here is one passage where Jesus talks about the days of Noah.



For the coming of the Son of Man will be just like the days of Noah. For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark, and they did not understand until the flood came and took them all away; so will the coming of the Son of Man be. Matthew 24:37-39

Since God says that he will bring a flood on mankind because he "saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually", many Bible teachers and commentaries focus on how evil the times were back then, and suggest that when Jesus returns, the world will be just as evil or worse. This may be true, but this isn't the focus of Jesus' point in Matthew 24:37-39. Notice that Jesus, himself, tells us how it will be. People will be eating and drinking, and marrying and giving in marriage. In other words, life will be pretty much normal.

In Noah's day, Noah was building an ark, and preaching about the coming flood. The people, however, were going about life as if nothing was going to happen. Noah was preaching the coming judgment, and people were going about their business as if nothing was going to happen. People weren't building their own boats, they weren't hiking to the tallest mountain, they weren't praying to God in repentance and asking for mercy to save their lives. They walked around as if oblivious to the coming judgment. And Jesus is trying to say that when he returns, people will have the same attitude as those who perished in the flood.

When Jesus returns, people will be going about their business during a normal day, acting as if things will continue as they have been for thousands of years. Nothing ever changes, people continue to have weddings and funerals and go to work and come home and get up and do it again, amen.



This is basically how I see it as well.

notuptome
Jan 31st 2011, 08:56 PM
This is basically how I see it as well.
What then shall we do with 2 Pet 3:10-13?

The Lord could return at anytime. There are no prophecies that must be fulfilled before He returns.

For the cause of Christ
Roger

David Taylor
Jan 31st 2011, 09:13 PM
Matthew and Luke both liken the 2nd Coming of Christ to the times of Noah. When they 'as in the days of Noah', it's a pretty simply thing they are comparing back to, that will also be the condition at the time of the 2nd Coming of Christ. Peter also weighed in on this in His epistle.

Here is the condition of the world as it was in the days of Noah, that it will also be like when Christ Returns.

Genesis 6:6 "And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at him And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth"

Here is the condition repeated at the second Coming, as Matthew re-tells....
Matthew 24:37 "But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be. For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered into the ark, And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be."



Here is the condition repeated at the second Coming, as Luke re-tells....
Luke 17:26 And as it was in the days of Noah, so shall it be also in the days of the Son of man. They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in marriage, until the day that Noah entered into the ark, and the flood came, and destroyed them all. Even thus shall it be in the day when the Son of man is revealed."



Here is the condition repeated at the second Coming, as Peter re-tells....
II Peter 3:4 "And saying, Where is the promise of his coming? for since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation. For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished: But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men. "

So the 'as in the days of Noah' refers to the wickedness of the Earth, and God's desctruction then of the earth by water;
paralleling the Revelation of Christ when the Earth again is filled with wickedness, and God's destruction of it next time by fire.

John146
Jan 31st 2011, 10:34 PM
Let me ask this, since I'm not entirely sure to what depth you want to discuss this topic. But since most take the flood of Noah's day to have been literal, mankind being wiped out in a flood, does that mean that we also have to conclude that God is literally going to set this planet ablaze when He returns, occupants and all?Yes, I believe so. Why else would Peter have compared the future fiery destruction directly with the flood?

2 Peter 3:5 For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water: 6Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished: 7But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men.


If He destroyed mankind via a flood in the past, why do it different this time, with literal fire?Because with fire He can burn everything up and destroy it and then change everything and make it new. With water some things would still be left. They'd be very wet, but still there.


I believe the Bible teaches that there will be parts of the earth ablaze, but the entire planet tho?Sure, why not?


Somehow I just don't believe that should be understood literally, as far as the entire planet is concerned, even tho I believe the flood should be.Why would Peter have compared that directly with the flood then? He said just as the world back then was overflowed with water the heavens and earth as they are now are reserved unto fire. How could that be a reasonable comparison if both aren't literal, physical events?

moonglow
Feb 1st 2011, 03:13 AM
Actually I have never seen any scriptures saying Noah preached to the people then or that he even warned them about the coming flood.

Even the passages posted above say the people didn't know until the flood came. :hmm:

Matthew 24:37 "But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be. For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered into the ark, And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be."

I always wondered about that because you would think they would have at least asked Noah what he was building and why. I heard a pastor say before the flood these people had never even seen rain at all let alone a flood of any kind...so they would have no concept of what was going to happen even if Noah tried to explain it to them. :hmm:

These people may have been far too gone to even try to give them a message of saving grace. :( God says nothing at all about trying to save any of them. He makes a statement instead:

Genesis 6:

7 So the LORD said, “I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth, both man and beast, creeping thing and birds of the air, for I am sorry that I have made them.” 8 But Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD.

Yet in nearly every other part of the bible God does offer a solution...He will say something like, If my people repent and turn back to me, away from their sins and false gods, I will not destroy them. That is repeated countless times to the Hebrews. Nothing like this is even remotely mentioned here though. No prophet sent out...no savior, no king..nothing because God had said this earlier in that passage: 5 Then the LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. 6 And the LORD was sorry that He had made man on the earth, and He was grieved in His heart.

This part I think people mistake for Noah preaching to these people:

2 Peter 2
5 For this they willfully forget: that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of water and in the water, 6 by which the world that then existed perished, being flooded with water.

Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament (http://www.studylight.org/com/bcc/view.cgi?book=2pe&chapter=002)
Verse 5
and spared not the ancient world, but preserved Noah with seven others, a preacher of righteousness, when he brought a flood upon the world of the ungodly;

Singificantly, Peter here refers to the flood recorded in Genesis as an historical event, denying the allegation of some that it was a myth.

The ancient world ...
In the Greek text here, Peter omitted the article; but Strachan said, "This is not a mark of illiteracy. The chapter is prophetic in form, and the omission of the article is characteristic of this style."

Noah with seven others ...
These were Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, with their respective wives.

A preacher of righteousness ...
There is not a word in Enoch about Noah's having been a preacher of righteousness; nor, for that matter, even a word in the Old Testament about it. The link is not between Peter and Enoch, but between Peter and Christ. Furthermore, the implication is clear, even in the Old Testament, that Noah attempted to persuade his contemporaries to renounce their evil ways and turn to God.

Yet I hear people say Noah tried to talk sense to them...or that Noah was mocked by them...I hear all sorts of things but never seen scriptures saying any of that happened. Maybe Noah was living so far away from these people they didn't even know he was building an ark. Scripture just doesn't tell us.

How wicked were they? We know God allowed Cane to continue to live inspite of killing his brother. So it had to be worse then murder. The Hebrews and later the Jews (not too mention the pagans) did some truly horrific things! Some of those pagan nations no longer exist btw but the Hebrews and Jews always eventually came to their senses. I always image the worse of the worse you hear about on the news...except it would be not one individual but a whole group of them. :(

Here is some interesting information:

Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament (http://www.studylight.org/com/bcc/view.cgi?book=ge&chapter=006)
Verse 3
And Jehovah said, My spirit shall not strive with man for ever, for that he also is flesh: yet shall his days be a hundred and twenty years.

This signals the withdrawal of the Holy Spirit from those who already had hardened their hearts against God, and we find in this the first Scriptural instance of Judicial Hardening, a phenomenon witnessed again and again throughout the Bible. It is not so designated here, but that is undeniably what it is. This is equivalent in every way to Paul's statement regarding a later evil generation that, "God gave them up ..." (Romans 1:24,26,28). This is different from causing men to sin, but it always leads to the proliferation and intensity of sin. It means that God will, at last, allow men the right of choosing sin, if they must. We shall encounter this phenomenon again and again in our studies. The result in this instance of it was the complete corruption of humanity (Noah and his family excepted), after the manner described below in Gen. 6:6-8. Paul also described the same condition in Rom. 1. "God gave them up."

(skipping down)

THE FIRST HARDENING OF HUMANITY

The entire Bible deals with the phenomenon of Judicial Hardening, and this is the first instance of it. Only four such occasions are evident in the Holy Scriptures, the others being: (2) the hardening of the entire pre-Christian world (Abraham excepted), as explained in Rom. 1; (3) the hardening of the whole of mankind (except a remnant) at the time of the First Advent of Christ, and (4) the final judicial hardening of the entire world just prior to the Second Advent of Christ, as depicted in Rev. 16.

Note:

1. The Hardening of humanity prior to the Flood

God's answer: The Flood
Exception: Noah

2. The Hardening of Rom. 1

God's answer: His Chosen People
Exception: The True Israel

3. The Hardening of mankind including the Jews

God's answer: The First Advent of Christ (mercy)
Exception: The remnant of the first Israel

4. The Hardening of the whole world (Rev. 16)

God's answer: The Second Advent of Christ (judgment)
Exception: The redeemed "in Christ"

It is fitting enough, and absolutely in accord with what is revealed in the prophets that the judgment should finally come at the end of the fourth Great Transgression of humanity. We believe that the peculiar expression found eight times in the opening chapters of the Book of Amos is explicitly related to the sequence given above. That expression is:

"For three transgressions of Damascus, yea for four, I will not turn away the punishment..." -- Amos 1:3.

Hope this helps in your studies. :)

God bless

Psalms Fan
Feb 1st 2011, 04:23 AM
Here is one passage where Jesus talks about the days of Noah.



For the coming of the Son of Man will be just like the days of Noah. For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark, and they did not understand until the flood came and took them all away; so will the coming of the Son of Man be. Matthew 24:37-39

Since God says that he will bring a flood on mankind because he "saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually", many Bible teachers and commentaries focus on how evil the times were back then, and suggest that when Jesus returns, the world will be just as evil or worse. This may be true, but this isn't the focus of Jesus' point in Matthew 24:37-39. Notice that Jesus, himself, tells us how it will be. People will be eating and drinking, and marrying and giving in marriage. In other words, life will be pretty much normal.

In Noah's day, Noah was building an ark, and preaching about the coming flood. The people, however, were going about life as if nothing was going to happen. Noah was preaching the coming judgment, and people were going about their business as if nothing was going to happen. People weren't building their own boats, they weren't hiking to the tallest mountain, they weren't praying to God in repentance and asking for mercy to save their lives. They walked around as if oblivious to the coming judgment. And Jesus is trying to say that when he returns, people will have the same attitude as those who perished in the flood.

When Jesus returns, people will be going about their business during a normal day, acting as if things will continue as they have been for thousands of years. Nothing ever changes, people continue to have weddings and funerals and go to work and come home and get up and do it again, amen.


QFT
15 Characters

Diggindeeper
Feb 1st 2011, 04:36 AM
Moonglow, Peter said that Noah preached!

2 Peter 2:5

5 And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;

John146
Feb 1st 2011, 05:00 PM
Moonglow, Peter said that Noah preached!

2 Peter 2:5

5 And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;Exactly. It's amazing that people try to deny even the most clear verses. Just because the OT doesn't specifically say he preached doesn't mean he didn't. It doesn't say he didn't, either. Peter clearly said that he did so why can't people just accept that? Since he did preach then it's very reasonable to assume that he did try to warn people about what was going to happen but they didn't listen and didn't take him seriously and kept going on about their normal business instead.

Amos_with_goats
Feb 1st 2011, 05:22 PM
I doubt Moonglow sought to 'deny' this clear verse, she probably did not think of it.

I see it as significant though, when we see scripture that contradicts our understanding that we not dismiss it.

When I saw the Lord's return as being 'before the great tribulation' the idea that it would be 'as in the days of Noah' was somehow used to support the idea.... the truth is that the lost pretty much live oblivious to the very real signs around them.

I am thankful that it is not so for us. :pp

1 Thessalonians 5:1-5 (New King James Version)

1 Thessalonians 5
The Day of the Lord
1 But concerning the times and the seasons, brethren, you have no need that I should write to you. 2 For you yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so comes as a thief in the night. 3 For when they say, “Peace and safety!” then sudden destruction comes upon them, as labor pains upon a pregnant woman. And they shall not escape. 4 But you, brethren, are not in darkness, so that this Day should overtake you as a thief. 5 You are all sons of light and sons of the day. We are not of the night nor of darkness.

John146
Feb 1st 2011, 05:29 PM
[FONT="Comic Sans MS"][SIZE="3"][COLOR="navy"]I doubt Moonglow sought to 'deny' this clear verse, she probably did not think of it. She quoted that verse in her post, but the commentary she referenced (Coffman) butchered the verse, IMO. Why does it matter whether or not it's mentioned in the OT when we have a NT verse that says very clearly that Noah was a preacher of righteousness?

Amos_with_goats
Feb 1st 2011, 05:31 PM
She quoted that verse in her post, but the commentary she referenced (Coffman) butchered the verse, IMO.

Thanks, I had not noticed that. Hopefully she will see it then.

Blessings,

moonglow
Feb 1st 2011, 06:11 PM
She quoted that verse in her post, but the commentary she referenced (Coffman) butchered the verse, IMO. Why does it matter whether or not it's mentioned in the OT when we have a NT verse that says very clearly that Noah was a preacher of righteousness?

Actually Coffman was using a different translation then what I quoted...many commentaries use the KJV and no I didn't catch that..thanks for pointing it out.

When I get a chance I will do some more studying on this...kind of hectic right now..snow day so my son is home.


Thank you Amos_with_goats...:) You are such a gentleman.

God bless

divaD
Feb 1st 2011, 07:21 PM
Exactly. It's amazing that people try to deny even the most clear verses. Just because the OT doesn't specifically say he preached doesn't mean he didn't. It doesn't say he didn't, either. Peter clearly said that he did so why can't people just accept that? Since he did preach then it's very reasonable to assume that he did try to warn people about what was going to happen but they didn't listen and didn't take him seriously and kept going on about their normal business instead.



I agree. But if there were people on the other side of the planet at the time, how did he preach to them? And if there weren't people on the other side of the planet, then why did God need to flood the parts where no life existed? I'm not looking to debate anything, just wondering how Noah was able to preach and warn everyone on the entire planet about the upcoming doom? Do you think God would do anything to people without them at least being warned first? There's folks on this planet right now who have never heard the gospel. Do you actually believe when Jesus returns, He's going to set them ablaze with the planet, even tho they had no clue there was even a Jesus to begin with?

John146
Feb 1st 2011, 08:54 PM
I agree. But if there were people on the other side of the planet at the time, how did he preach to them?I'm not saying he preached to everyone.


And if there weren't people on the other side of the planet, then why did God need to flood the parts where no life existed?I think life probably existed everywhere there was land. And the land may not have been like it is now. Some theorize that the land broke apart at that point to be as it is now but was one huge land mass at the time or something along those lines. There could be some truth to theories like that.


I'm not looking to debate anything, just wondering how Noah was able to preach and warn everyone on the entire planet about the upcoming doom?I don't think anyone is trying to say that he preached to literally everyone.


Do you think God would do anything to people without them at least being warned first?I think in one way or another He does warn everyone. It might not be directly through preaching but He is able to give messages to people through the Holy Spirit.


There's folks on this planet right now who have never heard the gospel. Do you actually believe when Jesus returns, He's going to set them ablaze with the planet, even tho they had no clue there was even a Jesus to begin with?This would relate to the thread where we've been talking about what happens to those who haven't heard of Jesus. I believe they will be judged according to what they do know. According to Paul in Romans 1:18-21 it appears that everyone is at least expected to understand that there is a God who is our Creator and that they should glorify Him as God and be thankful to Him.

moonglow
Feb 1st 2011, 10:01 PM
This part I think people mistake for Noah preaching to these people:

2 Peter 2
5 For this they willfully forget: that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of water and in the water, 6 by which the world that then existed perished, being flooded with water.

Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament (http://www.studylight.org/com/bcc/view.cgi?book=2pe&chapter=002)
Verse 5
and spared not the ancient world, but preserved Noah with seven others, a preacher of righteousness, when he brought a flood upon the world of the ungodly;

Singificantly, Peter here refers to the flood recorded in Genesis as an historical event, denying the allegation of some that it was a myth.

The ancient world ...
In the Greek text here, Peter omitted the article; but Strachan said, "This is not a mark of illiteracy. The chapter is prophetic in form, and the omission of the article is characteristic of this style."

Noah with seven others ...
These were Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, with their respective wives.

A preacher of righteousness ...
There is not a word in Enoch about Noah's having been a preacher of righteousness; nor, for that matter, even a word in the Old Testament about it. The link is not between Peter and Enoch, but between Peter and Christ. Furthermore, the implication is clear, even in the Old Testament, that Noah attempted to persuade his contemporaries to renounce their evil ways and turn to God.



Ok it took awhile to figure this out...but I finally did...:rolleyes: Actually I quoted the wrong verse...so the commentary is for a different verse..though I am sure some will still disagree with his conclusions.

I quoted 2 Peter 2:5 when I should have quoted 2 Peter 3:5..:rolleyes:

Yet still all we have is a vague 'preacher of righteous'. No indication warning was given to the wicked people. Noah may have tried to preach to these people for many years, simply telling them to turn to righteous. The scriptures are just too vague on this and since other scriptures say they 'knew not' the flood was coming, it really appears they weren't warned.

Matthew 24:37 "But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be. For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered into the ark, And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be."

Plus there is this passage too:

1 Peter 3:18-20 (New King James Version)

Christ’s Suffering and Ours

18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive by the Spirit, 19 by whom also He went and preached to the spirits in prison, 20 who formerly were disobedient, when once the Divine longsuffering waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which a few, that is, eight souls, were saved through water.

This is a very difficult passage...both Coffman and Adam Clarke's bible commentaries and Apologetics Press do not think Jesus went to Hades (should have been hades, not hell...prison) to preach to those that lived in Noah's time.

Anyway having read all three of these I am having a hard time with them because they seem to be jumping through alot of hoops to come up with their conclusions frankly. I need more time to study on this and of course pray the Holy Spirit teaches me.

God bless

Equipped_4_Love
Feb 1st 2011, 11:32 PM
These people may have been far too gone to even try to give them a message of saving grace. :( God says nothing at all about trying to save any of them. He makes a statement instead:

Genesis 6:

7 So the LORD said, “I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth, both man and beast, creeping thing and birds of the air, for I am sorry that I have made them.” 8 But Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD.


This is a great point!! I agree with what you are saying about God not trying to save any of them. In Gen. 6:3, God says "I will not strive with man forever, for He is indeed flesh." The word strive here means judge. What I am getting from this is basically God's Holy Spirit would stop His work of reproving and regeneration, and man was basically left on his own -- Romans 1 describes the condition of that kind of a person, whom God simply abandons to their own lusts. Also, the verse seems to indicate that man had reached such a carnal state.

Equipped_4_Love
Feb 1st 2011, 11:36 PM
How wicked were they? We know God allowed Cane to continue to live inspite of killing his brother. So it had to be worse then murder. The Hebrews and later the Jews (not too mention the pagans) did some truly horrific things! Some of those pagan nations no longer exist btw but the Hebrews and Jews always eventually came to their senses. I always image the worse of the worse you hear about on the news...except it would be not one individual but a whole group of them. :(


Think of the end times -- Think of the demonic activity that will be basically controlling the world until Jesus Christ finally comes. I am thinking it might have ben the same scenario. I do not believe that angels came down and had sex with women, but it is VERY APPARENT that there was incredible demonic activity in the world....and that people loved their sin, and embraced evil, and this demonic activity. They welcomed it. It might even be safe to say that the leaders of that time may have been largely demonized....we know from Scripture that it was unbearably oppressive. Think of a bunch of guys like Hitler and Pol Pot in power.

WSGAC
Feb 3rd 2011, 02:06 AM
I agree. But if there were people on the other side of the planet at the time, how did he preach to them? And if there weren't people on the other side of the planet, then why did God need to flood the parts where no life existed? I'm not looking to debate anything, just wondering how Noah was able to preach and warn everyone on the entire planet about the upcoming doom? Do you think God would do anything to people without them at least being warned first? There's folks on this planet right now who have never heard the gospel. Do you actually believe when Jesus returns, He's going to set them ablaze with the planet, even tho they had no clue there was even a Jesus to begin with?

Easy! He didn't have to preach on the other side of the world because it wasn't a global flood, but just a very large local flood.

moonglow
Feb 3rd 2011, 03:53 PM
Easy! He didn't have to preach on the other side of the world because it wasn't a global flood, but just a very large local flood.

Where did you read that in the bible?

WSGAC
Feb 3rd 2011, 04:22 PM
Where did you read that in the bible?

"The Nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward." - Genesis 6:4
Obviously the Flood did not destroy the the Nephilim, yet the Flood supposedly wiped out ALL flesh.

moonglow
Feb 3rd 2011, 04:27 PM
"The Nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward." - Genesis 6:4
Obviously the Flood did not destroy the the Nephilim, yet the Flood supposedly wiped out ALL flesh.

Or were born from those that didn't die later on....

WSGAC
Feb 3rd 2011, 04:29 PM
Or were born from those that didn't die later on....

If "all" the world was flooded, meaning the entire globe, then "all" flesh must include Nephilim too. Yet they were on the earth in those days and afterwards.

moonglow
Feb 3rd 2011, 04:32 PM
If "all" the world was flooded, meaning the entire globe, then "all" flesh must include Nephilim too. Yet they were on the earth in those days and afterwards.

Noah and his family didn't die, and obviously procreated...Nephilim were simply very large, tall people which we still find today.

Diggindeeper
Feb 3rd 2011, 04:38 PM
"The Nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward." - Genesis 6:4
Obviously the Flood did not destroy the the Nephilim, yet the Flood supposedly wiped out ALL flesh.


Or were born from those that didn't die later on....

Right, Moonglow. The wives of Noah's 3 sons did not come from Noah's lineage! The flood DID wipe out all flesh, but there WERE babies born later, to the wives of Noah's 3 sons! And, we all descended from those 3 sons of Noah. We have no idea the lineage line of Noah's 3 daughters-in-law!