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watchman 2
Apr 28th 2011, 06:46 AM
Some of you can keep me in prayer about finding a career focus as I am not very content with current career, and its ability to pay back my debts. I am having a hard time trying to find a focus as I have many passions. I do not desire to relocate so perhaps my passions will be limited by the careers in my area. I have taken career inventories and I get a ton of different results so its not easy. Dan Miller and some other career experts preach that I should go with what my passions are, but sadly things have not worked out that way.

I remember for the longest time I had no focus and direction on what my spiritual gifts were (a big part of this was due to being raised in a conservative church that ignored spiritual gifts) and my 1st year of seminary I was serving in a children's ministry and nursing home. Although I was very passionate about preaching & teaching and always loved doing this, the rest of the time I was bored. It was not until the summer that I took a class that made it a mandatory requirement to involve myself in evangelism and it was suggested by others to try out street evangelism. I did and I fell in love with it and having been doing it ever since. Second year of seminary I got a leadership position and led a street evangelism team. Ever since then I have been a very active street evangelist and open air street preacher. I have found like minded brethren to encourage me to continue preaching and witnessing regardless of what others believe. Lord willing the same focus can be found in a new career. Any advice or encouragement? Thanks..

John

AndrewBaptistFL
Apr 29th 2011, 10:50 PM
How are you doing brother John?

watchman 2
Apr 30th 2011, 10:28 AM
I am doing wonderful my friend, thanks for asking. Today I need to put a effort into my job search. I feel so much better being at new church and singles group as I know have a place to fellowship. :)

MaddJack
May 1st 2011, 12:32 AM
I would suggest picking the book 'What Color is Your Parachute' by Richard Bolles. Hands down, the best career book ever written.

amazzin
May 1st 2011, 12:49 AM
When I went into ministry I had already graduated with M.Sc as a pharmacist, served as a member of the armed forces and employed as a VP in the Pharmaceutical industry. I was always involved in one manner or the other as a lay leader and lay pastor in my dads church. Then I decided to forsake the big house, the huge ( and I mean huge) salary and work on my M.Div. My desire since the age of 9 was to be a pastor. To be a church planter. It was a burning passion inside of me but i had to wait until I was 32 to plant my first church. For many frustrating years that's all I wanted to do but God had to teach me a few things first.

1) I couldn't pant a church if I had no people following me
2) I couldn't be a pastor until I had love for the people he sent me.
3) I couldn't plant a church until I understood how to administer a church (operation and finances)
4) I couldn't plant a church until I had vision

....and so on and so forth. Today, I have planted church in Canada and Africa and soon in Qatar. They all apostolically report into us and their umbrella.

You see bro, what I am saying is that God gives you vision ( a destination if you will) but it takes a journey to get there. It's int eh journey that God refines you and prepares you. The passion doesn't go away if it is really what you are to do but you need to learn some stuff....character things and such





Some of you can keep me in prayer about finding a career focus as I am not very content with current career, and its ability to pay back my debts. I am having a hard time trying to find a focus as I have many passions. I do not desire to relocate so perhaps my passions will be limited by the careers in my area. I have taken career inventories and I get a ton of different results so its not easy. Dan Miller and some other career experts preach that I should go with what my passions are, but sadly things have not worked out that way.

I remember for the longest time I had no focus and direction on what my spiritual gifts were (a big part of this was due to being raised in a conservative church that ignored spiritual gifts) and my 1st year of seminary I was serving in a children's ministry and nursing home. Although I was very passionate about preaching & teaching and always loved doing this, the rest of the time I was bored. It was not until the summer that I took a class that made it a mandatory requirement to involve myself in evangelism and it was suggested by others to try out street evangelism. I did and I fell in love with it and having been doing it ever since. Second year of seminary I got a leadership position and led a street evangelism team. Ever since then I have been a very active street evangelist and open air street preacher. I have found like minded brethren to encourage me to continue preaching and witnessing regardless of what others believe. Lord willing the same focus can be found in a new career. Any advice or encouragement? Thanks..

John

watchman 2
May 1st 2011, 12:12 PM
I would suggest picking the book 'What Color is Your Parachute' by Richard Bolles. Hands down, the best career book ever written.

I would love too. However I made a promise to myself not to buy anymore books until I finish what I have in my hand. Currently I am reading 3 career books ( No More Mondays, The Christians Career Journey, & Discover who you are).

MaddJack
May 1st 2011, 03:15 PM
I would love too. However I made a promise to myself not to buy anymore books until I finish what I have in my hand. Currently I am reading 3 career books ( No More Mondays, The Christians Career Journey, & Discover who you are).

I agree, go through your present books. You can always go to the library to check out a book.

watchman 2
May 1st 2011, 05:17 PM
I agree, go through your present books. You can always go to the library to check out a book.

The Christians Career Journey is no doubt a book that should have been in hardcover. Its a very academic and technical book on jobs & careers with loads of details. I have no idea why the author made it in paperback format and marketed it to the consumer rather than to academic institutions. Is the Parachute book like that? 386 pages sounds like an academic book.

MaddJack
May 4th 2011, 12:38 AM
The Christians Career Journey is no doubt a book that should have been in hardcover. Its a very academic and technical book on jobs & careers with loads of details. I have no idea why the author made it in paperback format and marketed it to the consumer rather than to academic institutions. Is the Parachute book like that? 386 pages sounds like an academic book.

No, the Parachute book is written in plain, easy to understand English loaded, and I mean loaded with tons of useful information.

Just an example(I am paraphrasing):
Five Worst ways of finding the jobs that are out there:
1. Mailing(e-mailing) your resume out by the dozens. This has only a 7% success rate of landing a job.
2. Answering ads in professional or trade journals. This method has only a 7% success rate of landing a job.
3. Answering non-local newspaper ads in other parts of the nation. Only a 10% success rate
4. Answering local newspaper ads. A success rate of about 5-24% success rate.
5. Going to private employment agencies. Again, a success rate of 5-24%

Not too good of odds, is it? But these methods are the ways most people hunt for a job.

Five best ways to find the jobs:

1. Asking for jobs leds from friends, family, people in the community, career counseling centers. This has a success rate of 33%
2. Knocking on the doors of a potential place of employment, whether there is a known vacancy or not. A success rate of 47%
3. Using the telephone book and looking for potential employers/careers that would be of interest and then calling up these places. A success rate of 69%
4. Get in a group of people using #3. Success rate of 84%
5. Using the 'creative' approach to job hunting or career-changing(which is outlined in the following chapters) A success rate of 86%

I like these odds better but yet these are the methods that only a few use.

The authur doesn't candy coat it. Finding a meaningful job/career is HARD WORK and will not come easy but will pay off huge dividends in the long run.

Sounds like you need to throw that other book and head to the library and check out the 'Parachute' book.