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keck553
Oct 25th 2014, 10:18 PM
Act 8:1    (verseid:44.8.1)And Saul approved of his execution. And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles.

Why didn't the Apostles scatter?

keck553
Oct 25th 2014, 10:44 PM
I think my answer is in Acts 5:34-40

Scooby_Snacks
Oct 25th 2014, 11:20 PM
I love how they told them not to speak the name of Jesus and the Apostles did the opposite--they never ceased teaching and preaching after that time...:)

Bandit
Oct 26th 2014, 02:09 AM
Act 8:1    (verseid:44.8.1)And Saul approved of his execution. And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles.

Why didn't the Apostles scatter?

What makes you think that some of them did not eventually flee the region? Tradition has it that a number of them died far from Jerusalem. (And where was Paul beheaded?)

keck553
Oct 26th 2014, 02:29 AM
What makes you think that some of them did not eventually flee the region? Tradition has it that a number of them died far from Jerusalem. (And where was Paul beheaded?)

In the time line of the portion I posted it specifically says ''they were scattered except the Apostles." That is the context of my question.

Old man
Oct 26th 2014, 05:30 AM
In the time line of the portion I posted it specifically says ''they were scattered except the Apostles." That is the context of my question.

The 11 disciples (apostles) had scattered once before in the garden when they came to arrest Jesus because they were all scared. That was before they witnessed the power of the resurrection.

Now after witnessing the power and reality of resurrection the 11 apostles (disciples) even with threats of being arrested or worse they are no longer afraid and they don't scatter.

Just an observation. :hmm:

birdy
Oct 26th 2014, 09:24 AM
Act 8:1    And Saul approved of his execution. And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the apostles.

Why didn't the Apostles scatter?

The events of Acts 8 are pictures of the great tribulation period in parable form. Whenever you see the word 'great' in the Bible, it is usually associated with the time period. Great trouble, great wrath, great tribulation, great lamentation, great flood, and, in this case, great persecution. Notice it is on 'that day', more parable language for the great tribulation (that day and hour, etc.). Notice that at that time, Saul enters the houses and commits the persons there to prison (Acts 8). This is symbolic of Satan entering into the congregations and having sway there, putting the people into spiritual captivity, the unsaved condition. Notice that Stephen's martyrdom is the reason for this sort of judgement falling upon the congregations . Stephen is a picture of the true believers who are persecuted in the congregations, such that the congregations themselves eventually fall from salvation and reap the rewards of rejecting the true believers of Christ. This is parable language for the houses of God, the congregations of the church age going into captivity, or the unsaved condition as the tribulation period comes on. Anyway, the word apostle means 'sent'. Every true believer is 'sent' by God into the world to witness, as it were. In a certain sense, particularly a parable one, all true believers are apostles. They are sent. The true believers are not really scattered in the same sense that the congregations are. The true believers are kept by God during the tribulation period in the sense of still being saved, and secure in Christ.

keck553
Oct 26th 2014, 10:50 AM
Phillip was a true believer and wound up in Samaria. The Bible said he was one of the scattered ones.

Walls
Oct 26th 2014, 12:14 PM
For the Church to flourish after His departure, the Lotrd trained 12 Apostles over 3.5 years. Even the replacement for Judas had to have these qualifications ...

"... men which have companied with us all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among us, Beginning from the baptism of John, unto that same day that he was taken up from us, must one be ordained to be a witness with us of his resurrection."

So it would seem that until the Churches in the Gentile area were well established, the Lord wanted a reference point so that the ones He personally taught would continue as a unified voice in the doctrine governing the "New Man" - the Church. And He chose this unified voice in the area where the greatest opposition would lie - namely Judaism with its Law and traditions. This can be seen by the fact that

The greatest opposition to Christianity until 70 AD was the Jews and their Law
Pilate would have Jesus released but the Jews bayed for His death
Although the Romans governed Judea, it was the Jews doing the persecution. The Romans only wanted peace and order

That Jerusalem was often returned to and referred to can be seen in that;

Paul, when admonishing the Corinthians about Church order in 1st Corinthians 11:16, referred to an already established tradition in the Churches that already existed before them
Paul when regulating the order in the Meetings, 1st Corinthians 14:34, even referred back to the Law (which had its center in Jerusalem)
Paul, when he wanted to settle the issue of Gentiles and circumcision, made a long journey (those days) back to Jerusalem to settle it (Act.15:2)

So it would seem that while the great persecution dispersed the believers in Jerusalem who in turn disseminated the gospel, the core of Church doctrine was left intact until the Gentile Churches were well on their way.

keck553
Oct 27th 2014, 02:22 PM
Then it was as Gameliel said - "Leave these people alone...."

For a season anyway

birdy
Nov 6th 2014, 09:11 AM
And he burnt the house of the LORD, and the king's house, and all the houses of Jerusalem, and every great man's house burnt he with fire.
And all the army of the Chaldees, that were with the captain of the guard, brake down the walls of Jerusalem round about.
Now the rest of the people that were left in the city, and the fugitives that fell away to the king of Babylon, with the remnant of the multitude, did Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard carry away.
But the captain of the guard left of the poor of the land to be vinedressers and husbandmen. (2 Kings 25th chapter)

Here is a verse that shows the same time period and great tribulation event using somewhat similar parable language as Acts 8. Notice that although Israel was carried away into captivity in Babylon, the 'poor of the land' stayed 'unscattered' in the sense that they remained in Jerusalem as vinedressers and husbandmen (taking care of God's kingdom). I suspect that these are a parable picture of the true believers, spoken of using the parable language of 'apostles' in the Acts 8:1 verse mentioned to start this thread. Some few persons did not go into spiritual captivity, some where walking in Christ in all belief, the 'poor of the land (and by that we can mean poor in spirit in a parable sense), those Christ sent (apostles).
Keck553 noticed that Phillip was a true believer and yet was scattered, so we cannot say that being scattered makes one always an unbeliever. Indeed, the entire book of James is written to those believers who are scattered. Notice in the above verse that the Israelite multitude was carried away to Babylon "with the remnant of the multitude". The remnant is a group of true believers who were "scattered" to Babylon if you will. Daniel and the three Hebrew kids who wouldn't bow to the contrived image were some of the remnant. After the captivity, the walls of Jerusalem were rebuilt by Nehemiah, after the flood, the ark inhabitants went forth and multiplied, after the scattering, Phillip preached the gospel and joy was in the city.

keck553
Nov 6th 2014, 07:09 PM
"But they shouted, "Take him away! Take him away! Crucify him!" "Shall I crucify your king?" Pilate asked. "We have no king but Caesar ," the chief priests answered."


It's no accident that God allowed Giaus to place statues of himself in synagogues and the Temple. The rulers of Israel wound up with an exact image of what they were worshipping.

Religion has the appearance of godliness but denies the power of God. Those leaders didn't get scattered; the got dashed to pieces on the Rock.