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Aviyah
Sep 28th 2015, 03:36 AM
In Matthew 25:14-30, what do the "talents" represent and who would be a worthless servant?

luigi
Sep 28th 2015, 01:15 PM
In Matthew 25:14-30, what do the "talents" represent and who would be a worthless servant?

One who is enlightened, but does not share their illumination with others.

joined2him
Sep 28th 2015, 03:22 PM
In Matthew 25:14-30, what do the "talents" represent and who would be a worthless servant?

The exchange itself provides some clues: "'And I was afraid, and went away and hid your talent in the ground. See, you have what is yours.' But his master answered and said to him, 'You wicked, lazy slave, you knew that I reap where I did not sow and gather where I scattered no seed." (Matthew 25:25-26 NASB)

So it's clear, for starters, that people who are fearful and lazy are worthless servants.

keck553
Sep 28th 2015, 04:49 PM
Aviyah,

God has gifted you greatly. You have proved on these forums that you are incredibly intelligent and resourceful.

Don't bury that gift. Boldly use it to glorify His Name.

I think the same kind of advice would have been given the servant with one talent had he asked for it.

Sojourner
Sep 28th 2015, 05:01 PM
The Lord dispenses judiciously to His servants according to their potential and capability, and expects reasonable dividends on His investement. In my view, the worthless servant is one who knowingly squanders his or her potential, wasting opportunities to bring glory to the Lord and His kingdom.

Ta-An
Sep 28th 2015, 05:30 PM
I would love to think (and have believed this over many years) that the Talents are abilities you have been gifted with.
However, I visited many different congregations/denominations during the month of December 2014, and many of them were preaching on this specific verse, and they all said that the word "Talent" means money....
Mt 25:27 Thou oughtest therefore to have put my money to the exchangers, and then at my coming I should have received mine own with usury.

Aviyah
Sep 28th 2015, 05:32 PM
One who is enlightened, but does not share their illumination with others.

How does that fit into the idea of receiving multiple talents? I assume you mean enlightenment in terms of the gospel.


So it's clear, for starters, that people who are fearful and lazy are worthless servants.

True. Any idea what this type of person is fearful in doing (or not doing)?


I would love to think (and have believed this over many years) that the Talents are abilities you have been gifted with.

That's what I think initially. Would you say the servants are increasing the amount of gifts and abilities they have?

Christinme
Sep 28th 2015, 05:34 PM
I think it means talents/gifts that God has given you. And a worthless servant would be someone who didn't use it for building His Kingdom (although it may take awhile before one is ready to use it).

Ta-An
Sep 28th 2015, 05:41 PM
That's what I think initially. Would you say the servants are increasing the amount of gifts and abilities they have? I'll say we discover more, the more we use what we already have...

Sojourner
Sep 28th 2015, 06:26 PM
That's what I think initially. Would you say the servants are increasing the amount of gifts and abilities they have?

I see it in the sense of "reproducing." That is, producing fruit with seeds that produce even more fruit. Ultimately, the return on the investment of talents and abilities the Lord blesses us with translates into bringing glory to Him and souls added to His kingdom. Each person we help bring to the Lord by means of what He endows us with, further increases the return when they reach someone else. Make sense?

joined2him
Sep 28th 2015, 07:18 PM
How does that fit into the idea of receiving multiple talents? I assume you mean enlightenment in terms of the gospel.



True. Any idea what this type of person is fearful in doing (or not doing)?



That's what I think initially. Would you say the servants are increasing the amount of gifts and abilities they have?

I can think of lots of examples of professed Christians who are fearful and lazy in being about the Lord's business. A really common one is the person who doesn't actually want to leave his/her own home to be with other people at all, much less join the assembly of the saints and the work that others are doing in the kingdom.

We are not called to sit in the comfort of our own homes, doing our own thing. We are called to be God's witnesses to the world. The "here I am, come and get it" philosophy appeals to control freaks....and that extends to some assemblies of the saints, as well, who aren't missional, but view themselves as being "hospitals" for sinners....who become comfortable and complacent in their convalescence instead of being healed and going forth in their lives to glorify God.

The church is to be relational because God is relational!

slynx1947
Sep 28th 2015, 07:41 PM
I would love to think (and have believed this over many years) that the Talents are abilities you have been gifted with.
However, I visited many different congregations/denominations during the month of December 2014, and many of them were preaching on this specific verse, and they all said that the word "Talent" means money....
Mt 25:27 Thou oughtest therefore to have put my money to the exchangers, and then at my coming I should have received mine own with usury.

They are all correct. According to Strong's, the Biblical term translated "talent" means "a coin or sum of money". However, many preachers extrapolate that the spiritual point of this parable could be that the "talent" is a reference for anything given to us by God; and extrapolate the moral of the parable to be that God expects us to use whatever He gives us in His service and for His glory.

Scooby_Snacks
Sep 28th 2015, 08:26 PM
Is the worthless servant the same as a person who does not bear fruit from faith?

episkopos
Sep 28th 2015, 08:28 PM
In Matthew 25:14-30, what do the "talents" represent and who would be a worthless servant?

One who has received grace but remained the same way he was before...same character. God gives us grace in order that we would become a giver as He is. Takers get their grace taken away.

TheDivineWatermark
Sep 28th 2015, 08:33 PM
I would love to think (and have believed this over many years) that the Talents are abilities you have been gifted with.
However, I visited many different congregations/denominations during the month of December 2014, and many of them were preaching on this specific verse, and they all said that the word "Talent" means money....
Mt 25:27 Thou oughtest therefore to have put my money to the exchangers, and then at my coming I should have received mine own with usury.

I was going to point out, not only the parallel of Luke 19:12,15,17,19,23 (context: His "RETURN"), but also the truths expressed in Luke chapter 16 (the entire chapter... all of it): "a steward," "thy stewardship," "steward [as a verb]," "the steward," "the stewardship," "the unjust steward,"... "that, when ye fail ,"...

and the verses 11-12, "If therefore ye have not been faithful in the unrighteous mammon/wealth, who will commit to your trust the true riches? And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?" (see the parallels in Luke 12:42-44 and Matthew 24:45-47... all of these refer to that which will take place at His Second Coming [I]to the earth and thereafter: i.e. the earthly Millennial Kingdom).

The passage goes on to say in verse 15, "the Pharisees also, who were covetous/lovers of money, heard all these things, and they derided him." Then He goes on to talk about "the law and the prophets" and in verse 18 talks about [teaches on] "commiteth adultery," and then on to talk about "a certain rich man" and "a certain beggar named Lazarus"
... and concludes that whole passage with, "If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded though one rose from the dead."


As I see it, "the stewardship" (so to speak ["another man's riches" in these passages we're looking at now]) has to do with "a particular message to be conveyed" (in a given time period).

I believe the Matthew 25 parable (as many of the related "parables"), as part of the Olivet Discourse, speaks to the time period immediately preceding and leading up to His Second Coming to the earth for the commencement of the kingdom age, that is, the 7-yr tribulation period leading up to that. (Matthew 24:14 being the message proclaimed therein, specifically.)

(not that we cannot apply the principles as well... I see them applying to "the Church which is His body" in 1 Corinthians 3:10-4:17 where it talks about "stewards of the mysteries of God" and "let every man take heed how he buildeth thereon [gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble]," that is, 1 Corinthians 3:10, where it says, "According to the grace of God which is given unto me [Paul], as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation...")

chad
Sep 28th 2015, 10:45 PM
Some commentaries mention that the talents are money and some mention that talents are gifts given to believers.

The meaning of the parable imo, God has given us all talents. We should not waste those talents, but we can use them to do good not only in our lives, but also for the gospel as well. The parable encourages us to use the talents God has given us, rather than just let them go to waste.

slynx1947
Sep 29th 2015, 12:52 AM
Is the worthless servant the same as a person who does not bear fruit from faith?

No. Mat 25:30 indicates he goes to Hell; only unbelievers go there, so he wasn't saved (no fruit if you're not saved). One could extrapolate that the "talents" given are differing amounts of faith, the worthless servant then wasted his faith by not using it to get saved!

Mat 25:30 And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

wendy-p-marshall
Sep 29th 2015, 12:59 AM
Could this be referring to soul-winning? For example I don't go soul-winning (knocking on doors) "per-say", but I do still try to give the Gospel to as many people as I can and I ask many people if they believe in Jesus and try to get a conversation going with them to find out if they're Saved or not. When I realize they are clearly not saved I try to give them the Gospel and teach them how to get Saved.

This parable always scares the H-E-Double-Hockey-Sticks out of me! Still today...

slynx1947
Sep 29th 2015, 02:17 AM
Could this be referring to soul-winning? For example I don't go soul-winning (knocking on doors) "per-say", but I do still try to give the Gospel to as many people as I can and I ask many people if they believe in Jesus and try to get a conversation going with them to find out if they're Saved or not. When I realize they are clearly not saved I try to give them the Gospel and teach them how to get Saved.

This parable always scares the H-E-Double-Hockey-Sticks out of me! Still today...

The part of the parable concerning the worthless servant cannot be referring to soul-winning.

Mat 25:30 indicates he goes to Hell; only unbelievers go there, so he wasn't saved. If one is not saved, one wouldn't be concerned about soul-winning. One could extrapolate that the "talents" given are differing amounts of faith, the worthless servant then wasted his faith by not using it to get saved!

For the folks given the other "talents", you could easily substitute whatever might be given to us by God and what He expects us to do with it, keeping in mind that God expects Christians to do EVERYTHING with the guidance and empowerment of the Holy Spirit (not by our OWN reasoning and power).

wendy-p-marshall
Sep 29th 2015, 02:22 AM
The part of the parable concerning the worthless servant cannot be referring to soul-winning.

Mat 25:30 indicates he goes to Hell; only unbelievers go there, so he wasn't saved. If one is not saved, one wouldn't be concerned about soul-winning. One could extrapolate that the "talents" given are differing amounts of faith, the worthless servant then wasted his faith by not using it to get saved!

For the folks given the other "talents", you could easily substitute whatever might be given to us by God and what He expects us to do with it, keeping in mind that God expects Christians to do EVERYTHING with the guidance and empowerment of the Holy Spirit (not by our OWN reasoning and power).


That makes sense, I always assumed this was a parable about soul-winning.

mailmandan
Sep 29th 2015, 10:33 AM
The talents represent monetary value and is distributed each according to his ability (Matthew 25:15-17). The requirement is to invest in Christ. The first two servants deposited their money with the bankers (vs. 27) but the third servant buried his money in the ground. The fact that the latter man in this parable is called wicked and lazy and an unprofitable servant (Matthew 25:30) who is cast out into outer darkness, certainly indicates that he was not a genuine believer. The fact that this man is called a "servant" does not mean necessarily that he was saved. The Jews are called the Lord’s servants, but they were not all saved (Isaiah 43:10). This man's characterization of the master maligns him as a hard man, reaping where he has not sown, and gathering where he has not scattered seed. This wicked, lazy, unprofitable so-called servant does not represent a genuine believer, for it is obvious that this man had no true intimate knowledge of the master.

awestruckchild
Sep 29th 2015, 12:38 PM
Some commentaries mention that the talents are money and some mention that talents are gifts given to believers.

The meaning of the parable imo, God has given us all talents. We should not waste those talents, but we can use them to do good not only in our lives, but also for the gospel as well. The parable encourages us to use the talents God has given us, rather than just let them go to waste.

In a broader, more inclusive sense, the talents could be anything God gives you. Any knowledge of Him you hide for fear of what the churchy people will do or say or scream at you, for one. Mercy, for another, that you receive and then hide or refuse to share with others, etc.

awestruckchild
Sep 29th 2015, 12:55 PM
The part of the parable concerning the worthless servant cannot be referring to soul-winning.

Mat 25:30 indicates he goes to Hell; only unbelievers go there, so he wasn't saved. If one is not saved, one wouldn't be concerned about soul-winning. One could extrapolate that the "talents" given are differing amounts of faith, the worthless servant then wasted his faith by not using it to get saved!

For the folks given the other "talents", you could easily substitute whatever might be given to us by God and what He expects us to do with it, keeping in mind that God expects Christians to do EVERYTHING with the guidance and empowerment of the Holy Spirit (not by our OWN reasoning and power).

Hi, slynx! I have been reading a lot of your posts but I haven't had the chance to say hello. :)
I understand what you are saying here but I see it another way also. The worthless servants may be those who have been led to believe the lie that says a man is secure no matter WHAT he does thereafter.
That is the deal to cheat death that God spoke of through the prophets.
It is the placing of a bandaid on a mortal, blood spurting, highly infected wound.
You can see what I am intending to say by the verse, Lord! Lord! Haven't we cast out demons in Your name and performed many miracles??
Do you see what I'm saying? They actually believe they are secure.
I am sure there are some who KNOW they don't believe and are just trying to grab some money, but there are some who have been so deceived that there will be shock on their faces.
They think one can say they believe in Jesus yet not prove it by obeying His commands and yet they are secure.
It's repeating what Israel did and what Israel became.
It's like John the B said - prove by the way you live that you have repented.

luigi
Sep 29th 2015, 12:57 PM
How does that fit into the idea of receiving multiple talents? Those who receive great enlightenment share their abundance, while those who receive little enlightenment, keep it to themselves.


I assume you mean enlightenment in terms of the gospel.Enlightened in terms of the truth, which is the gospel of peace.

ForHisglory
Sep 29th 2015, 03:48 PM
In Matthew 25:14-30, what do the "talents" represent and who would be a worthless servant?
Jesus said this:
Joh 15:1 "I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinedresser.
Joh 15:2 Every branch in me that does not bear fruit he takes away, and every branch that does bear fruit he prunes, that it may bear more fruit.
So another way to understand the servant is to see it as a branch.
We have branches which bear fruit, which may be pruned in order to bear more fruit.
Or like the worthless servant it is a branch that bears NO fruit.
What happens to such a branch?
It is taken away - which shows it was once a branch.
And worse:
Joh 15:6 If anyone does not abide in me he is thrown away like a branch and withers; and the branches are gathered, thrown into the fire, and burned.
So ALL branches are connected to Him, but those who don't abide IN Him, fail to have fruit and so thrown away to wither and ultimately be burned up.
It is 100% speaking to believers (not unbelievers).
We again have this idea here:
Mat 13:18 "Hear then the parable of the sower:
Mat 13:19 When anyone hears the word of the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what has been sown in his heart. This is what was sown along the path.
Mat 13:20 As for what was sown on rocky ground, this is the one who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy,
Mat 13:21 yet he has no root in himself, but endures for a while, and when tribulation or persecution arises on account of the word, immediately he falls away.
Mat 13:22 As for what was sown among thorns, this is the one who hears the word, but the cares of the world and the deceitfulness of riches choke the word, and it proves unfruitful.
Mat 13:23 As for what was sown on good soil, this is the one who hears the word and understands it. He indeed bears fruit and yields, in one case a hundredfold, in another sixty, and in another thirty."

So we find that of the four places where the seed is scattered, one has no response; one responds with joy, but then produces no fruit and falls away; one more receives the word but is also unfruitful, and the final one has a return of fruit (which can be of varying amounts.

So in many various parables we have Jesus highlighting that if we do NOT bear fruit (make no return) then we are in danger of being cast into Hell, for that is what happens to the branch which had none, and the servant who got zero return.
I would like to highlight though something special. Jesus said this:
Mat 25:27 Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and at my coming I should have received what was my own with interest.
Even if we seem unable to gain much return we have the possibility of investing in others.
We read this another way here:
Rev 3:8 "'I know your works. Behold, I have set before you an open door, which no one is able to shut. I know that you have but little power, and yet you have kept my word and have not denied my name.

The worthless servant had no excuse, because Jesus knows our every weakness. He knows what we are capable of, and He delights in working through our weakness. All we need to be is willing and hold to His word. The worthless servant however had some knowledge of God, but did NOT live in the knowledge of Him, as one who loves, upholds and empowers.
The example then in this specific parable is money, and ties into the idea of buying treasure in heaven. Yet it is not ONLY about money, but about bearing fruit for eternity.

Sojourner
Sep 29th 2015, 04:44 PM
It's important to note that after speaking about the stewards and their talents, Jesus immediately speaks of the sheep and goat judgment at His return, which is clearly about charity outside the realm of money. I think He makes it clear that His servants are expected to minister to the needs of others by whatever means are at their didposal.

Showing hospitality to strangers, ministering to the physical needs of those less fortunate, visiting the sick and those forgotten souls in prison, etc, are acts of kindness taken very seriously by the Lord, and the consequences of apathy rather than compassion are as damning as the steward who buried his talent.

I believe the bigger picture we should take away from all this is that we are expected to invest everything we have and everything we are into the kingdom of God, as portrayed in the parables of the hidden treasure and the pearl of great price in Matt 13. We also see the importance of demonstrating our faith, as described in the book of James, rather than having it lie dormant inside us, and a sobering reminder that there will be an accounting.

ForHisglory
Sep 29th 2015, 04:48 PM
It's important to note that after speaking about the stewards and their talents, Jesus immediately speaks of the sheep and goat judgment at His return, which is clearly about charity outside the realm of money. I think He makes it clear that His servants are expected to minister to the needs of others by whatever means are at their didposal.

Showing hospitality to strangers, ministering to the physical needs of those less fortunate, visiting the sick and those forgotten souls in prison, etc, are acts of kindness taken very seriously by the Lord, and the consequences of apathy rather than compassion are as damning as the steward who buried his talent.

I believe the bigger picture we should take away from all this is that we are expected to invest everything we have and everything we are into the kingdom of God, as portrayed in the parables of the hidden treasure and the pearl of great price in Matt 13. We also see the importance of demonstrating our faith, as described in the book of James, rather than having it lie dormant inside us, and a sobering reminder that there will be an accounting.
The thing is though that the Sheep and Goats judgement has NOTHING to do with those within the church - unless you take the view that Jesus' brothers are the Jews.
This statement in regards to the Sheep and Goats is not a parable and so is a different focus. It is speaking of how people treat His brothers (which I understand to be those in Him.)
There are other passage which speak of visiting the sick etc, but this is about judgement for eternal life, which we, as believers, won't face. So though it is true we should care for others, that should be a natural outworking of the change within. This then is more to do with the End Times when He returns and what He will do in judgement at that time.

Sojourner
Sep 29th 2015, 04:59 PM
The thing is though that the Sheep and Goats judgement has NOTHING to do with those within the church - unless you take the view that Jesus' brothers are the Jews.
This statement in regards to the Sheep and Goats is not a parable and so is a different focus. It is speaking of how people treat His brothers (which I understand to be those in Him.)
There are other passage which speak of visiting the sick etc, but this is about judgement for eternal life, which we, as believers, won't face. So though it is true we should care for others, that should be a natural outworking of the change within. This then is more to do with the End Times when He returns and what He will do in judgement at that time.

I understand your point, and agree, with regard to eschatology. But the overarching truth remains that what believers do or fail to do with what we are given has deeper consequences than most of us realize. Far too many Christians today feel they have their ticket for the glory train and are standing idly by, instead of living their faith for those around them--many who see only apathy and hypocrisy in the Christians they are acquainted with. Actions speak louder than words--and are far more convincing.

ForHisglory
Sep 29th 2015, 05:32 PM
I understand your point, and agree, with regard to eschatology. But the overarching truth remains that what believers do or fail to do with what we are given has deeper consequences than most of us realize. Far too many Christians today feel they have their ticket for the glory train and are standing idly by, instead of living their faith for those around them--many who see only apathy and hypocrisy in the Christians they are acquainted with. Actions speak louder than words--and are far more convincing.
Oh definitely, hence the emphasis in my previous post on fruit, but that it is a response to real change within a person and not a question of their ability.

Ta-An
Sep 29th 2015, 07:43 PM
I see it in the sense of "reproducing." That is, producing fruit with seeds that produce even more fruit. Ultimately, the return on the investment of talents and abilities the Lord blesses us with translates into bringing glory to Him and souls added to His kingdom. Each person we help bring to the Lord by means of what He endows us with, further increases the return when they reach someone else. Make sense? I took some time to chew on this... and you are so right...
When I taught Sewing at school... you could see this principal demonstrated in the attitude of young girls towards the subject.... girls from mothers who could sew and loved it, transferred this love and ability to their daughters... where the girls that hated the subject reflected the mothers attitude towards sewing/knitting etc.
Thus, where a person/parent loves the LORD, it is seldom that the children don't follow in their footsteps of love towards God.... so by example one can 'grow talent' by ones attitude/love..... I hope I interpreted correctly what you said..??

Sojourner
Sep 29th 2015, 11:38 PM
I took some time to chew on this... and you are so right...
When I taught Sewing at school... you could see this principal demonstrated in the attitude of young girls towards the subject.... girls from mothers who could sew and loved it, transferred this love and ability to their daughters... where the girls that hated the subject reflected the mothers attitude towards sewing/knitting etc.
Thus, where a person/parent loves the LORD, it is seldom that the children don't follow in their footsteps of love towards God.... so by example one can 'grow talent' by ones attitude/love..... I hope I interpreted correctly what you said..??


Pretty much, Ta-An. :) There is an underlying design in nature for replication. As we read in Genesis, from the very beginning, the Lord designed living things with seed in them for reproducing themselves. We are in fact, all here today having children because Adam and Eve were created this way. Likewise, in a spiritual sense, saved people are able to "reproduce" when the Gospel that was seeded in them is shared by them in other fertile hearts, and brought forth to harvest by the Holy Spirit. We see this in the Apostle Paul's reference to Timothy as "my true son in the faith" (1 Tim 1:2). Imagine if every saved person won just three souls to the kingdom!

Noeb
Sep 30th 2015, 01:01 AM
I was going to point out, not only the parallel of Luke 19:12,15,17,19,23 (context: His "RETURN"), but also the truths expressed in Luke chapter 16 (the entire chapter... all of it): "a steward," "thy stewardship," "steward [as a verb]," "the steward," "the stewardship," "the unjust steward,"... "that, when ye fail ,"...

and the verses 11-12, "If therefore ye have not been faithful in the unrighteous mammon/wealth, who will commit to your trust the true riches? And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?" (see the parallels in Luke 12:42-44 and Matthew 24:45-47... all of these refer to that which will take place at His Second Coming [I]to the earth and thereafter: i.e. the earthly Millennial Kingdom).

The passage goes on to say in verse 15, "the Pharisees also, who were covetous/lovers of money, heard all these things, and they derided him." Then He goes on to talk about "the law and the prophets" and in verse 18 talks about [teaches on] "commiteth adultery," and then on to talk about "a certain rich man" and "a certain beggar named Lazarus"
... and concludes that whole passage with, "If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded though one rose from the dead."


As I see it, "the stewardship" (so to speak ["another man's riches" in these passages we're looking at now]) has to do with "a particular message to be conveyed" (in a given time period).

I believe the Matthew 25 parable (as many of the related "parables"), as part of the Olivet Discourse, speaks to the time period immediately preceding and leading up to His Second Coming to the earth for the commencement of the kingdom age, that is, the 7-yr tribulation period leading up to that. (Matthew 24:14 being the message proclaimed therein, specifically.)

(not that we cannot apply the principles as well... I see them applying to "the Church which is His body" in 1 Corinthians 3:10-4:17 where it talks about "stewards of the mysteries of God" and "let every man take heed how he buildeth thereon [gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble]," that is, 1 Corinthians 3:10, where it says, "According to the grace of God which is given unto me [Paul], as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation...")This is pretty much my take as well.