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Jubal
Jan 19th 2007, 05:50 AM
And again he said, Whereunto shall I liken the kingdom of God?

It is like leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened.

How do you interpret this? Is the kingdom of God the leaven? And the world the meal? Or is the kingdom of God the meal that has something bad mixed into it? As leaven was almost always described as corrupting.

Benaiah
Jan 19th 2007, 06:21 AM
Jesus is pointing out how the kingdom progresses. it begins small, ie; a mustard seed and grows into a large tree, or a bit of leaven that eventually permeates the entire lump.

RogerW
Jan 19th 2007, 04:29 PM
And again he said, Whereunto shall I liken the kingdom of God?

It is like leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened.

How do you interpret this? Is the kingdom of God the leaven? And the world the meal? Or is the kingdom of God the meal that has something bad mixed into it? As leaven was almost always described as corrupting.

Here in Luke 12 Christ says the leaven of the Pharisees is hypocrisy.

Lu 12:1 In the mean time, when there were gathered together an innumerable multitude of people, insomuch that they trode one upon another, he began to say unto his disciples first of all, Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy.

If leaven represents the TRUTH of Jesus Christ why was it hidden? Is it a good thing that the TRUTH is hidden?

Matthew 13:33 Another parable spake he unto them; The kingdom of heaven is like unto leaven, which a woman took, and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened.

Here in 1 Co 5 the leaven is referred to as malice and wickedness.

1Co 5:8 Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

Here in Galatians 5 Paul likens leaven to those who hinder us not to obey the truth.

Ga 5:7 Ye did run well; who did hinder you that ye should not obey the truth?
Ga 5:8 This persuasion cometh not of him that calleth you.
Ga 5:9 A little leaven leaveneth the whole lump.

Then we have this verse which likens the leaven to doctrine. But this is not just any doctrine, nor is it true doctrine it is likened to, it is the doctrine of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees.

Mt 16:12 Then understood they how that he bade them not beware of the leaven of bread, but of the doctrine of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees.

I’ve searched every New Testament usage for the word “leaven” and while I will agree that this leaven does demonstrates the effect it has on the covenant church, nowhere do I find that leaven is ever referred to as anything but evil.

Since this is something evil coming against the kingdom (the universal church), I'm wondering if the three measures represent the three enemies that come against the child of God; the world, the flesh, and Satan? I further wonder if these three might symbolize the beast, the false prophet, and the devil? It's interesting that it is three, reminds us of the three that bear witness in heaven, and the three that bear witness on earth.

1Jo 5:7 For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.
1Jo 5:8 And there are three that bear witness in earth, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one.

Stands to reason why three since Satan comes as an angel of light and his ministers are transformed into ministers of righteousness.

2Co 11:14 And no marvel; for Satan himself is transformed into an angel of light.
2Co 11:15 Therefore it is no great thing if his ministers also be transformed as the ministers of righteousness; whose end shall be according to their works.

As far as the whole being leavened; that should not surprise us, Christ repeatedly chastens us to repent or the candlestick will be removed. (The letters to the churches)


RW

Lars777
Jan 19th 2007, 04:37 PM
And again he said, Whereunto shall I liken the kingdom of God?

It is like leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened.

How do you interpret this? Is the kingdom of God the leaven? And the world the meal? Or is the kingdom of God the meal that has something bad mixed into it? As leaven was almost always described as corrupting.


Let's begin with the meal. It is the central element in this story. The woman and the leaven both did something to the three measures of meal. That is what our Lord is trying to get across to us. So the central question is: "What does the meal represent?"

THE MEAL OFFERING

This crowd of Jews would know instantly what he had in mind. With their Judaistic background and training in the Old Testament their minds would flash back immediately to one of the most common offerings in Israel--the meal offering, consisting of three measures of meal carefully prescribed to be unleavened, without any yeast in it at all.

Very likely many of them would think back to the very first time the phrase "three measures of meal" appears in the Scriptures. It is in Genesis 18. Abraham was in his tent by the oaks of Mamre one day, and he looked out the door and saw three strangers approaching.

He went to meet them, for strangers were an uncommon sight in those days and anyone passing by was offered hospitality. He welcomed them and offered them three measures of meal which Sarah baked into bread while they were visiting together out under the trees. During their conversation it suddenly broke upon Abraham's astonished intelligence that God himself was visiting him, accompanied by two angels.

That was the beginning of the use of the three measures of meal as a symbol. What did it mean?

It is clear that it became a symbol of the fellowship of God with his people and their fellowship with one another. Meal is a beautiful picture of commonality of life. In the Bible it is always a picture of humanity, a humanity which is all alike.

Just as each grain of cereal or meal is like all the other grains, people are alike and share in the same quality and nature. And they blend together to make up something valuable.

So, very early in the life of the Jewish people the three measures of meal became a picture of the people of God sharing the life and the fellowship of God. When the Old Testament people offered the three measures of meal, they were describing in beautifully picturesque language what was very precious in God's sight--the oneness of God with his family, God with his people, the life they shared with each other under the Fatherhood of God.

Later on, in the Book of Judges, when Gideon was suddenly confronted with the angel of God, he brought him an offering of three measures of unleavened meal.

When Hannah, the mother of Samuel, went to worship God in the temple she took with her an offering of three measures of meal, unleavened. So this is a common symbol throughout the Old Testament, and it was familiar to these Jews to whom Jesus spoke. They knew instantly what he meant.

In I Corinthians, Paul said to the church at Corinth that the key thing about their lives as Christians was that they were called into the fellowship of God: "God is faithful, by whom you were called into the fellowship of his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord" (1 Corinthians 1:9). This is the key to that great letter.

That is what Christianity is all about. It is the sharing of the life of Jesus together. We share his life and all that he is. And when John opens his first letter he says,

that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you may have fellowship with us; and our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ (1 John 1:3).

So there is the meaning of the three measures of meal, the unleavened bread of sincerity, honesty, and truth. It is very precious to God that his people become honest and open and acceptant toward one another, with nothing hidden between them.

They are to understand one another, bear one another's burdens, uphold one another, and share together the life of God in their midst, the life of a living Lord.

That is what our Lord introduced into the world by bringing the gospel-this marvelous seed dropped into the heart of humanity which produces a willingness to be open and to stop hiding behind facades and to be honest in sharing the forgiving grace of Jesus Christ.

SYMBOL OF EVIL

Now let's look at the leaven. The disciples would quickly recognize its meaning. It is used all through the Old Testament, and always the same way. Never once is leaven used as a symbol of anything good.

Everyone in this crowd knew that this woman had no business putting leaven into the three measures of meal. That would destroy the very meaning of this significant offering, for Scripture had taught them that the three measures of meal were to be unleavened.

You remember that in Egypt, before the Jews ate the first Passover, God sent them all through their houses with candles and lamps looking for leaven. They were to clear every bit of it out of the house lest any of it get into the three measures of meal for the Passover feast and destroy the beauty of the symbolism.

They were to search meticulously, to look in corners, on shelves, and in the closets. (Perhaps this is where the custom of spring house cleaning began because Passover is in the spring.) The Jewish people still do this today as a result of that teaching way back in the time of Moses.

In the New Testament you find five distinct references to leaven, and they all mean something bad. Never, ever in the Scriptures does leaven symbolize something good; it is always a type of something evil.

Jesus frequently spoke of leaven. He said to his disciples, "Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees." And, lest we misunderstand what he meant, Luke adds: "The leaven of the Pharisees is hypocrisy," pretending to be something you are not, pretending to a status before God which you don't actually possess, being phony, putting on an outward appearance of religiosity but inwardly still having the same old evil thoughts and angry moods and bitter attitudes. That is the leaven of the Pharisees--hypocrisy.

Then Jesus spoke of the leaven of the Sadducees. That is rationalism--the idea that life consists only of what you can taste and see and touch and smell and hear and think about, that there is nothing beyond that, no supernatural activity of God in life, no resurrection, no angels, no life after death.

And he spoke of the leaven of the Herodians, the followers of King Herod. Their leaven was materialism. They taught that the great value of life is to be powerful and wealthy. If you can acquire wealth and power, then you have the secret of life.

Many today are following the philosophy of the Herodians, holding the attitude that what makes life worthwhile is the possession of things. That is evil, Jesus says. That is not the way you properly measure manhood or the value of a life.

In his Epistles the Apostle Paul spoke of leaven. In 1 Corinthians 5 he cites the case of a man who was actually living in incest with his father's wife, and Paul says that sexual immorality is leaven within the church, destroying its fellowship. He goes on to say,

Your boasting is not good. Do you not know that a little leaven leavens [ferments] the whole lump [of dough]? Cleanse out the old leaven that you may be a new lump [fresh dough], as you really are unleavened. For Christ, our paschal lamb, has been sacrificed. Let us, therefore, celebrate the festival, not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth (1 Corinthians 5:6-8).

That is what the bread stood for: sincerity, honesty, truth and openness--a recognition of each other's value and a transparency before each other. Anything which wrecks or ruins that or distorts it and puffs it up is leaven.

Finally in the Book of Galatians Paul again speaks of leaven, this time in connection with legalism. There were false teachers who tried to put people under the law under a set of rules by which to live expecting them to have the power to obey simply by their own effort.

The very heart of the gospel is that Christ has come to set us free from that. The world has been trying to live on that basis for centuries, and it has never been successful. Every effort to obey a rule and thus to satisfy God even with external obedience, let alone internal, is doomed to failure before it begins if you are depending upon yourself for the necessary power.

That way of life is called leaven. It, too, destroys the fellowship of God's people.

So leaven, obviously, is anything which disintegrates, breaks up, and corrupts, or causes a puffed up, swollen condition--destroying honesty and obscuring reality.

That is what yeast does when you put it into bread. The housewife says that it lightens the bread because it puffs it up, swells it up. At a certain point she arrests the action of the yeast by baking the bread in the oven. But leavened bread will spoil far more quickly than unleavened. Leaven is disruptive and corrupting.

WHODUNNIT?

Now we come to the last symbol and the key question. Here we have these two elements: (1) the fellowship of God's people which, as Jesus looked down the age, he saw as a very precious and important way of life which he had introduced into society, and (2) something which corrupts that by introducing this fivefold evil of leaven into the fellowship.

Who does this? Who is this woman? The French, you know, have a little saying they use whenever trouble arises: "Cherchez la femme," "look for the woman." I don't know but what this may be the origin of that saying.

Commentators have tried to identify the woman in this parable with a specific woman in history, and it is amazing what they have come up with. Some suggest it is Joan of Arc, who is supposed to have destroyed the fellowship of the church by introducing false doctrines.

But when a woman is used symbolically in Scripture it always means the same thing--some religious authority either out of place or doing the wrong thing, some misuse of a relationship with God.

It is clear that the woman belongs in the story. A woman is an authority in the home--one who had the right to prepare the bread of fellowship. This woman was in her rightful place, in her kitchen.

It was her job to prepare the bread. But she had no right to hide leaven in it. And the very fact that she hides it indicates sneaky motives; she is trying to get away with something she knows is wrong.

Now bring the picture together. Our Lord is looking down the centuries to follow and he sees the thing which is most precious to God about the work which he himself has begun among mankind.

This is the fellowship of God with his people, the sharing of life with each other and with God, the family of God, the oneness of the body of Christ--with all the members sharing life in openness and honesty together under the love and forgiveness of the Father.

And into that wonderful fellowship these false, evil principles are introduced by those who had the right and the authority to preserve this fellowship, that is, the leaders of the church. It is they who introduce the leaven into it, who permit it to come in and do not exclude it as they should.

Those who are charged with the responsibility of developing the fellowship of God's people, nevertheless allow hypocrisy, formalism ritualism rationalism, materialism legalism, immorality--all of these things--to come in. And when these things get into a church, they destroy the fellowship of God's people.

As we apply it to ourselves, we can see that this is what has been happening. This is why churches are often charged with being cold and unfriendly--there's no fellowship. It is too often only on the most superficial basis that people come and sit together in the congregation.

They come, not as members together of one great family, but as individuals--listening to the service, but not relating to the person next to them. But that isn't Christianity as it is intended to be manifested.

That is only a form, only a moment in the Christian life. The major part is to be the sharing of each other's concerns, the bearing of one another's burdens, the confessing of our faults one to another and praying for one another that we may be healed, the opening of our lives and the transparency of our actions before others. This is the great fellowship that our Lord is seeking.

As you trace this pattern down through history, you can see how leaven has been working. The very ones who were responsible to keep God's house free from it--the leaders, the pastors, the elders, the teachers within the church--are the ones responsible for allowing these conditions to come in and prevail. And each time they have done so they have destroyed this marvelous fellowship.

Kahtar
Jan 19th 2007, 05:00 PM
Here is one use of leaven in the Old Testament that has been ignored thus far:

Ye shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves of two tenth deals: they shall be of fine flour; they shall be baken with leaven; [they are] the firstfruits unto the LORD. And ye shall offer with the bread seven lambs without blemish of the first year, and one young bullock, and two rams: they shall be [for] a burnt offering unto the LORD, with their meat offering, and their drink offerings, [even] an offering made by fire, of sweet savour unto the LORD. Then ye shall sacrifice one kid of the goats for a sin offering, and two lambs of the first year for a sacrifice of peace offerings. And the priest shall wave them with the bread of the firstfruits [for] a wave offering before the LORD, with the two lambs: they shall be holy to the LORD for the priest. Leviticus 23:17-20So we can see that there is at least one instance of leaven being a good thing.Now let's look at that parable again, along with the parable preceeding it:

Another parable put he forth unto them, saying, The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field: Which indeed is the least of all seeds: but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof. Another parable spake he unto them; The kingdom of heaven is like unto leaven, which a woman took, and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened.
Matthew 13:31-33
One thing that stands out to me is that Jesus said the Kingdom of Heaven is like leaven. If leaven always represents something bad (which is not the case), then that would indicate that the kingdom of heaven contained something bad (which it does not).
In the first parable, the seed is hidden, in the soil, but then it grows into a large tree which provides benefit.
Christ was hidden in the soil, dead and buried, He was the seed, the firstfruit, and because He died and was buried, now we have this marvelous Tree providing benefit to all the nations.
In our own hearts, we receive the Word, hide it in our hearts, and it grows within us, to the point that it effects every part of our lives, our spirit, our soul, our body, our mind, our actions, our words. Because we take that bit of truth into ourselves, it grows and benefits all around us, bringing the light of truth into others lives.
In the world, Christ was buried, then resurrected. The church sprang up, and though small to begin with, it now encompasses the globe, effecting and bringing benefit to every tribe, tongue, and nation.

Lars777
Jan 19th 2007, 05:10 PM
"And you shall count from the morrow after the sabbath, from the day that you brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven full weeks shall they be, counting fifty days to the morrow after the seventh sabbath; then you shall present a cereal offering of new grain to the LORD. You shall bring from your dwellings two loaves of bread to be waved, made of two tenths of an ephah; they shall be of fine flour, they shall be baked with leaven, as first fruits to the LORD." [Then there follow animal and cereal offerings similar to those we have already examined earlier in Leviticus] (Leviticus 23:15-17 RSV)




This feast, because it came fifty days after the Feast of First Fruits, was called Pentecost. Pentecost means fiftieth. Notice that this too fell on the day after a sabbath, Sunday, further evidence that God has shifted the day of celebration for believers to the first day of the week.

How was this fulfilled historically in the carrying out of God's work with his people? You remember what happened on Pentecost. On that day as the disciples were gathered in the upper room the Holy Spirit suddenly came upon them in a new way. A new body was formed, the body of the church, made up no longer simply of Jews alone but, as Peter announced, of Jews and Gentiles -- two loaves baked with leaven.

Leaven, as we have seen, is a picture of the working of evil in our lives. And when the Holy Spirit came, he came upon people just like you and me, people still struggling with leaven, this principle of self-sufficiency.

And we can be filled with the Holy Spirit as they were filled on that day. He can live in us and work in us. So the church as it exists today is beautifully symbolized by these two loaves -- Jews and Gentiles together -- filled with the Spirit, and still possessing leaven within us. This was the beginning of the new work that God was going to do with his people.

The heart of this feast was these two loaves, baked with leaven. Baking is accomplished by heat, by fire. And in the Scriptures fire always symbolizes judgment. As the Holy Spirit took up residence in men and women still capable of sin, the leaven still there, this nevertheless was testimony that God would work in his people, would judge their leaven and bring it under control.

They themselves would never in this life be an example of what Christianity is in its perfection -- you can see that only in Christ. But nevertheless they would be the expression of God's fellowship with humanity. Those two loaves have been at work all through the history of the world since then.

RogerW
Jan 19th 2007, 05:43 PM
One thing that stands out to me is that Jesus said the Kingdom of Heaven is like leaven. If leaven always represents something bad (which is not the case), then that would indicate that the kingdom of heaven contained something bad (which it does not).
In the first parable, the seed is hidden, in the soil, but then it grows into a large tree which provides benefit.
Christ was hidden in the soil, dead and buried, He was the seed, the firstfruit, and because He died and was buried, now we have this marvelous Tree providing benefit to all the nations.
In our own hearts, we receive the Word, hide it in our hearts, and it grows within us, to the point that it effects every part of our lives, our spirit, our soul, our body, our mind, our actions, our words. Because we take that bit of truth into ourselves, it grows and benefits all around us, bringing the light of truth into others lives.
In the world, Christ was buried, then resurrected. The church sprang up, and though small to begin with, it now encompasses the globe, effecting and bringing benefit to every tribe, tongue, and nation.

Greetings Kahtar,

These parables are not depicting the heavenly realm called the Kingdom of Heaven. These are pictures as the kingdom exists in her earthly form.

In these Parables the "Kingdom of Heaven" is limited as to its Time and its Sphere. Its Time is from the First to the Second Coming of Christ, and its Sphere is over that part of the world that we call Christendom. The kingdom of God on earth, i.e. the church universal. In this "Kingdom of Heaven" there is a mixture of good and evil, of "Wheat" and "Tares," of "Good Fish" and "Bad Fish," of "Wise Virgins" and "Foolish Virgins".

John the Baptist appeared at the Jordan preaching-- "Repent ye: for the Kingdom of Heaven is AT HAND." Mt 3:2. And we are told that his mission was to "Prepare the Way of the Lord." Mt 3:3; Isa 40:3. Prepare the way of the Lord for what? Not for the "Cross" but the "Kingdom." John's message had no meaning to those who heard him and were looking for the setting up of the "Messianic Kingdom," if he did not mean by the "Kingdom of Heaven" an outward and visible earthly Kingdom. That John himself so believed is evident from the question he sent his disciples while in prison to ask Jesus-- "Art Thou He that should come or do we look for another?" Mt 11:3. The fact that Jesus answered John's question by a number of miracles of healing, which are the "signs" of the Messianic Kingdom (Isa 35:1-10), and were proofs of Christ's Messiahship, and told John's disciples to so report, is proof that both John and Jesus had in mind the earthly Messianic Kingdom when they proclaimed that the "Kingdom of Heaven was AT HAND." It was the "Kingdom of Heaven," not because it was a Heavenly or Spiritual Kingdom, but because it was not received from men, but was given from Heaven by God the Father.

When Christ speaks of the kingdom He is not always referring to the eternal dwelling place of God. The kingdom is also referenced as being with us, even within us now, in an earthly sense. Christ ushered in the kingdom by His death and resurrection on the cross. The Messianic Kingdom will be made manifest through the Church. This is why the church external is said to be the representation of the Kingdom on earth. It is in this earthly assembling of the “called out ones” where we find not only the eternally elect of God, but also the leaven, the evil, the tares, the bad, and the foolish, both the Christians, and antichrists.

If the kingdom always means the heavenly abode, would some of the elect entering into the kingdom be called the least, while others are called great? Are there different rewards in heaven depending upon how faithful we are in the flesh?

Mt 5:19 Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.

How could these be called children of the kingdom and then be cast out? What kingdom are they cast out of, could it be heaven?

Mt 8:12 But the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Can violent men take the kingdom, the heavenly abode by force? What kingdom of heaven is this that suffers violence, and is taken by force?

Mt 11:12 And from the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent take it by force.

After having cast out a devil, Jesus tells us the kingdom of God is come. This is not the kingdom which will come down out of heaven, so what kingdom of God is Jesus talking about?

Mt 12:28 But if I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you.

Nothing offensive can enter into the kingdom which is in heaven, so where/what is the kingdom where the Son of man shall send His angels to gather out things that offend?

Mt 13:41 The Son of man shall send forth his angels, and they shall gather out of his kingdom all things that offend, and them which do iniquity;

Christ tells us the kingdom of God is within us, but He also tells us the kingdom is not of this world. How can the kingdom be within us, and yet be not of this world?

Lu 17:20 And when he was demanded of the Pharisees, when the kingdom of God should come, he answered them and said, The kingdom of God cometh not with observation:
Lu 17:21 Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there! for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.

Joh 18:36 Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence.

RW

Kahtar
Jan 19th 2007, 06:01 PM
Thank you Roger. I wasn't confused on that issue, though.
In my view, just as sin, when it is allowed in, will spread and ruin the whole being, so also is the Holy Spirit, and the Word of God, in that IT will spread and affect the entire being as well.
If we allow the leaven of sin in our lives, it will have it's effect. If we allow the leaven of the Holy Spirit in our lives, it also will have its effect.
This is not saying anything at all about some kingdom out in the universe somewhere, but the kingdom of heaven as it exists in our hearts.

Frances
Jan 19th 2007, 06:56 PM
Leaven increases what is already there. So the good of the Kingdom of God increases even when hidden - eg at the time of the cultural revolution in China there were not all that many Christians there, and because of persecution they had to go 'underground' where the leaven of Christianity grew undetected, then when the spiritual climate was more open the world discovered the extent of their growth.

(the leaven of the Pharisees caused what was bad in their teaching to grow)

Steven3
Sep 12th 2007, 08:14 AM
Hello :)

Has anyone noticed that Jesus says she "hid" the leaven rather than "mixed" it? This is the Greek word "encrypt" (en- means in, crypt means secret, hidden). In fact this parable 13:21 and 13:33 is the only time the word is used in the NT.

It is also used in the Greek OT seven times:
Josh7:21-22 re. Achan hiding (burying) stolen money in his tent,
Prov19:24, "The sluggard buries his hand in the dish and will not even bring it back to his mouth."
Hosea13:12, "The iniquity of Ephraim is bound up; his sin is hidden."
Amos9:3, "if they hide from my sight at the bottom of the sea"
Ezek4:12, "you shall hide the barley cake in man's dung."
1Maccabees16:15. re. Ptolemy hiding his men at a banquet and killing Simon Maccabeus when his men were drunk.



eg-kruptô (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=e%29gkru%2Fptw&bytepos=44280489&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) ,
A. hide or conceal in, dalon (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=dalo%2Fn&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) spodiêi (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=spodih%3D%7C&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) enekrupse (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=e%29ne%2Fkruye&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) melainêi (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=melai%2Fnh%7C&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) Od.5.488 (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3aabo%3atlg%2c0012%2c002%3a5%3a4 88&vers=original&word=e%29gkru%2fptw#word1) , cf. Sotad.Com.1.29; [ôia] (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=w%29%7Ca%2F&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) en (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=e%29n&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) dermati (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=de%2Frmati&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) lagôou (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=lagwou%3D&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) Arist.HA 619b15 ; ti (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=ti&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) eis (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=ei%29%2Fs&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) ti (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=ti&bytepos=44280566&wordcount=2&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) Ev.Matt.13.33 (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3aabo%3atlg%2c0031%2c001%3a13%3a 33&vers=original&word=e%29gkru%2fptw#word1) , Apollod.1.5.1 (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3aabo%3atlg%2c0548%2c001%3a1%3a5 %3a1&vers=original&word=e%29gkru%2fptw#word1) (Pass.), etc. 2. pur (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=pu%3Dr&bytepos=44282005&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) e. bank it up, Ar.Av.841 (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3aabo%3atlg%2c0019%2c006%3a841&vers=original&word=e%29gkru%2fptw#word1). 3. Med., hide oneself, melathrois (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/morphindex?lang=greek&lookup=mela%2Fqrois&bytepos=44282407&wordcount=1&embed=2&doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057) Nonn.D.32.285 .

It doesn't have to have any negative context, but it often does. Also the related adjective "kryptos" hidden is used 17 times in the NT translated "secret" in the KJV, primarily negatively.

In any case - both in Matt13 and Luke13 the context is not all rosy:


The Mustard Seed and the Leaven

18 He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what shall I compare it? 19 It is like a grain of mustard seed that a man took and sowed in his garden, and it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.”
20 And again he said, “To what shall I compare the kingdom of God? 21 It is like leaven that a woman took and hid in three measures of flour, until it was all leavened.”
The Narrow Door

22 He went on his way through towns and villages, teaching and journeying toward Jerusalem. 23 And someone said to him, “Lord, will those who are saved be few?” And he said to them, 24 “Strive to enter through the narrow door. For many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able. 25 When once the master of the house has risen and shut the door, and you begin to stand outside and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us,’ then he will answer you, ‘I do not know where you come from.’ 26 Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank in your presence, and you taught in our streets.’ 27 But he will say, ‘I tell you, I do not know where you come from. Depart from me, all you workers of evil!’ 28 In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God but you yourselves cast out. 29 And people will come from east and west, and from north and south, and recline at table in the kingdom of God. 30 And behold, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.”


S. :)