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PeterJ
May 10th 2007, 02:26 PM
BBC News - “Astronomers have found the most Earth-like planet outside our Solar System to date, a world which could have water running on its surface.

The planet orbits the faint star Gliese 581, which is 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra.

Scientists made the discovery using the Eso 3.6m Telescope in Chile.

They say the benign temperatures on the planet mean any water there could exist in liquid form, and this raises the chances it could also harbor life.

‘We have estimated that the mean temperature of this 'super-Earth' lies between 0 and 40 degrees Celsius, and water would thus be liquid,’ explained Stephane Udry of the Geneva Observatory, lead author of the scientific paper reporting the result.

‘Moreover, its radius should be only 1.5 times the Earth's radius, and models predict that the planet should be either rocky - like our Earth - or covered with oceans.’

Xavier Delfosse, a member of the team from Grenoble University, added: ‘Liquid water is critical to life as we know it.’

He believes the planet may now become a very important target for future space missions dedicated to the search for extra-terrestrial life.

These missions will put telescopes in space that can discern the tell-tale light ‘signatures’ that might be associated with biological processes.

The observatories would seek to identify trace atmospheric gases such as methane, and even markers for chlorophyll, the pigment in Earth plants that plays a critical role in photosynthesis…”

cbalke
May 10th 2007, 02:32 PM
coooooooooooool!!!!

mikeynash
May 10th 2007, 02:44 PM
Link? Couldn't find this on the BBC website.

Dunedanranger
May 10th 2007, 05:53 PM
He believes the planet may now become a very important target for future space missions dedicated to the search for extra-terrestrial life.


Then he isn't very smart. The little globe is 20.5 lightyears away. Even if they did send something into space like they suggest, they're barely going to knock a dent in that kind of distance.

rchivers
May 10th 2007, 05:57 PM
Then he isn't very smart. The little globe is 20.5 lightyears away. Even if they did send something into space like they suggest, they're barely going to knock a dent in that kind of distance.

Thats funny, I had the same thought, although I did not know how far away it was I figured is was far enough.

Dunedanranger
May 10th 2007, 06:02 PM
Thats funny, I had the same thought,

Be carefull what you say! That was a great compliment to me, and a great insult to you.;)

TSP
May 10th 2007, 07:16 PM
I’ve been following the story closely for the last couple weeks or so since it has been out. My question is would it change people’s beliefs IF I only say IF there was another intelligent life form in space???

TSP
May 10th 2007, 07:19 PM
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/04/24/earthlikeplanet_spa.html?category=space&guid=20070424164530 (http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/04/24/earthlikeplanet_spa.html?category=space&guid=20070424164530)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6589157.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6589157.stm)

a couple links to check it out.

Dunedanranger
May 10th 2007, 07:48 PM
I’ve been following the story closely for the last couple weeks or so since it has been out. My question is would it change people’s beliefs IF I only say IF there was another intelligent life form in space???


Why would I change the way I believe just because there was life on another planet? Even if it uses reason, wouldn't that just add to God's glory?

slightlypuzzled
May 10th 2007, 07:51 PM
Then he isn't very smart. The little globe is 20.5 lightyears away. Even if they did send something into space like they suggest, they're barely going to knock a dent in that kind of distance.

Hey, at warp speed that is only a few hours away........:D

Dunedanranger
May 10th 2007, 07:59 PM
It would be fun going at warp speed. . . :D




Until you stopped.:)

lbeaty1981
May 10th 2007, 09:20 PM
Hey, at warp speed that is only a few hours away........:D

Ludicrous speed would get you there even quicker. :D

Dunedanranger
May 10th 2007, 10:00 PM
:o What is "ludicrous speed" from?! I can't remember but it seems so funny...:confused

Parax
May 10th 2007, 10:05 PM
Not Hitchhikers?

SLJ1962
May 11th 2007, 12:26 AM
It was Spaceballs.

cbalke
May 11th 2007, 12:59 AM
i see your shwarz is as big as mine!!!!!11!!! ham sandwich

Saved7
May 11th 2007, 01:04 AM
I’ve been following the story closely for the last couple weeks or so since it has been out. My question is would it change people’s beliefs IF I only say IF there was another intelligent life form in space???


Probably for some, while for others like me, there might be the consideration that this is the "new earth" that comes down from heaven.:pp

Dunedanranger
May 11th 2007, 05:29 AM
It was Spaceballs.

That is strange, I've never seen Spaceballs. Not that I'm doubting you, its just weird.


Probably for some, while for others like me, there might be the consideration that this is the "new earth" that comes down from heaven.:pp

That is a cool interpretation!

TEITZY
May 11th 2007, 08:40 AM
Here's (http://www.creationontheweb.com/content/view/5093/) an article by Gary Bates from CMI on this new planet.

mikeynash
May 11th 2007, 08:45 AM
isn't it 20.5 MILLION light years away?

PeterJ
May 11th 2007, 03:55 PM
That is strange, I've never seen Spaceballs. Not that I'm doubting you, its just weird.



That is a cool interpretation!

Its my best spoof film very funny.

Clavicula_Nox
May 11th 2007, 05:13 PM
Then he isn't very smart. The little globe is 20.5 lightyears away. Even if they did send something into space like they suggest, they're barely going to knock a dent in that kind of distance.

Assuming the liberals allow us to research and field propulsion systems that can push spacecraft to speeds that would allow the Theory of Relativity to kick in, then yes it is quite unattainable for man-powered craft.

Assuming cryogenic stasis can be worked out, then we could send "sleeper," ships once the atmosphere has been verified. Or something.

Jesusinmyheart
May 11th 2007, 06:27 PM
Probably for some, while for others like me, there might be the consideration that this is the "new earth" that comes down from heaven.

I had the same thought, that this is our new heaven and earth. Libra.. the starsign of the scales of justice..... Who else but Yeshua could be the Judge ?

I will not for one moment buy into an alien theory.

MikeAD
May 11th 2007, 07:46 PM
I had the same thought, that this is our new heaven and earth. Libra.. the starsign of the scales of justice..... Who else but Yeshua could be the Judge ?

I will not for one moment buy into an alien theory.

Why?

Who knows, we find organisms everyday on our own earth that we had no idea existed, I don't really see the difference.

Dunedanranger
May 13th 2007, 04:28 AM
Assuming the liberals allow us to research and field propulsion systems that can push spacecraft to speeds that would allow the Theory of Relativity to kick in, then yes it is quite unattainable for man-powered craft.

Assuming cryogenic stasis can be worked out, then we could send "sleeper," ships once the atmosphere has been verified. Or something.

You lost me there.;) I thought the Theory of Relativity involved matter/energy relationships.:confused

Clavicula_Nox
May 13th 2007, 04:32 AM
You lost me there.;) I thought the Theory of Relativity involved matter/energy relationships.:confused

You're correct, it does. It gets extrapolated to things involving space flight, such as propelling something fast enough at, "Relativistic Speeds," and is theorized that at such speeds time is handled differently. The quickly moving ship, while existing in the same universe and reality, has time, "slowed," whereas the rest of the universe is in, "normal," time.

In other words, for the crew of the ship, 2 years might pass, where 20 or 30 or 40 years might pass for the "outside world."

Dunedanranger
May 13th 2007, 05:07 AM
You're correct, it does. It gets extrapolated to things involving space flight, such as propelling something fast enough at, "Relativistic Speeds," and is theorized that at such speeds time is handled differently. The quickly moving ship, while existing in the same universe and reality, has time, "slowed," whereas the rest of the universe is in, "normal," time.

In other words, for the crew of the ship, 2 years might pass, where 20 or 30 or 40 years might pass for the "outside world."

That's cool. Don't you think it might have adverse phsycological effects on the actual travelers though?

Clavicula_Nox
May 13th 2007, 06:21 AM
That's cool. Don't you think it might have adverse phsycological effects on the actual travelers though?

The only things I could think of would be the sense of loss from all living relatives being old, dying, or dead and perhaps a feeling of seperation due to the vast distances in space.

Generational space-flight is exciting to me.