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  • Question about Matthew

    I was at the doctor's office cause my mom broke her arm (they think it was her collar bone) and I started reading a Gideons bible, and I must say, it was awesome compared to my KJV or NIT cause it was easier to read for some reason, but anyways:

    I am about to start doing a study on the chapter of Matthew cause its a widely quoted chapter from the catholic forum I am from, and I am wanting to read it cause I got through 2 parts of it yesterday at the doctor's, is their any tips/hints/info I should know about it?

  • #2
    This is where one might ask - what chapter?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Emanate View Post
      This is where one might ask - what chapter?
      This is where one might say - the whole book of Matthew.

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      • #4
        Hmmm...

        My only suggestion would be to take notes. What is the writing style like? What does the author focus on? What parts of the life of Jesus are presented and how? Then when you get to the rest of the gospels, you can see how each authors approach was different.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ChristianKnight View Post
          I was at the doctor's office cause my mom broke her arm (they think it was her collar bone) and I started reading a Gideons bible, and I must say, it was awesome compared to my KJV or NIT cause it was easier to read for some reason, but anyways:

          I am about to start doing a study on the chapter of Matthew cause its a widely quoted chapter from the catholic forum I am from, and I am wanting to read it cause I got through 2 parts of it yesterday at the doctor's, is their any tips/hints/info I should know about it?
          Matthew is widely regarded as the Gospel to the Jews, because it was clearly written for a hebrew audience. It quotes the OT more than any other Gospel. It is intended to establish that Jesus IS the Messiah long promised by the prophets. Thus, I would suggest studying it from this perspective. Further, spend significant time going over chapters 5-7 (the Sermon on the Mount). This is the Christian version of the 10 commandments and illustrates Christ's theology in a practical application sense more than any other part of the NT.

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          • #6
            Matthew has the Lord's Prayer

            Originally posted by ChristianKnight View Post
            ... is their any tips/hints/info I should know about it?
            In the the Sermon on the Mount you will find Matthew's version of the Lord's Prayer. The Lord's Prayer is found only in Matthew and Luke. My suggestion is to meditatively read the Lord's Prayer, to pray it before each time you read the book of Matthew and then ask yourself, "How is Jesus in Matthew an answer to the petitions of the prayer?"

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            • #7
              Each of the four gospels has its own particular focus (even though there is much in common). Matthew tends to focus on Jesus as Messiah/King. Mark tends to focus on Christ as the Servant. Luke tends to emphasize Christ's humanity. John tends to emphasize Christ's divinity.

              If you'll notice in Revelation (I think chapter 4), you'll find a creature with four faces. The first face was that of a lion ("king" of beasts). The second is that of an ox (a "servant" of mankind). The third is that of a man (a "human"). The fourth is that of an eagle (which flies in the "heavens", close to where "God" dwells).

              So I would read Matthew with an emphasis on Christ as Messiah/King to the Jews.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Psalms Fan View Post
                Each of the four gospels has its own particular focus (even though there is much in common). Matthew tends to focus on Jesus as Messiah/King. Mark tends to focus on Christ as the Servant. Luke tends to emphasize Christ's humanity. John tends to emphasize Christ's divinity.

                If you'll notice in Revelation (I think chapter 4), you'll find a creature with four faces. The first face was that of a lion ("king" of beasts). The second is that of an ox (a "servant" of mankind). The third is that of a man (a "human"). The fourth is that of an eagle (which flies in the "heavens", close to where "God" dwells).

                So I would read Matthew with an emphasis on Christ as Messiah/King to the Jews.
                Good post. I've never heard the analogy of the four gospels (and their focus) with the four faces of the creature in revelation. I also note that Ezekial decribes "cherubim" with the same four faces in his book. This is a thought provoking analogy worthy of further consideration on my part.

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