Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hebrew scriptures

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hebrew scriptures

    We know that the Hebrew Scriptures refer to the Old Testament. My question is when we say Hebrew scriptures, do we mean the scriptures of the Hebrews or scripture that is written in the Hebrew language and that of course would be the O.T. The latter is what I always assumed. However, in reading about the Hellenistic and Hebraic Jews from various sites it seems that what was available even during the time of Jesus was Aramiac text and the Hebrew language had fallen into disuse. They spoke either Greek or Aramiac. Anyone know with certainty anything about this subject?

  • #2
    Originally posted by mickeyrory View Post
    My question is when we say Hebrew scriptures, do we mean the scriptures of the Hebrews or scripture that is written in the Hebrew language and that of course would be the O.T.
    It's probably a combination of both. The majority of the Tanakh is written in Hebrew and was obviously produced and circulated by Hebrews. However, some of the texts were written in part in other languages, like Aramaic (e.g. Daniel). The Septuagint is the Greek translation of the Tanakh but still can be referred to as the "Old Testament." I think the titles "Old Testament" and "Hebrew Scriptures" refers more to the nation the texts were produced and circulated by than the actual language they were written in; it is more the content that the titles are concerned with than the languages the content are presented in. I could be wrong, though.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mickeyrory View Post
      We know that the Hebrew Scriptures refer to the Old Testament. My question is when we say Hebrew scriptures, do we mean the scriptures of the Hebrews or scripture that is written in the Hebrew language and that of course would be the O.T. The latter is what I always assumed. However, in reading about the Hellenistic and Hebraic Jews from various sites it seems that what was available even during the time of Jesus was Aramiac text and the Hebrew language had fallen into disuse. They spoke either Greek or Aramiac. Anyone know with certainty anything about this subject?
      Aramaic was a prominent semitic language from the time of the patriarchs.
      Aramaic was the language of Semitic peoples throughout the ancient Near East. It was the language of the Assyrians, Chaldeans, Hebrews and Syrians. Aram and Israel had a common ancestry and the Hebrew patriarchs who were of Aramaic origin maintained ties of marriage with the tribes of Aram. The Hebrew patriarchs preserved their Aramaic names and spoke in Aramaic.

      The term Aramaic is derived from Aram, the fifth son of Shem, the firstborn of Noah. See Gen. 10:22. The descendants of Aram dwelt in the fertile valley, Padan-aram also known as Beth Nahreen.
      THE HISTORY OF THE ARAMAIC LANGUAGE
      I think what is meant by OT is the scriptures that were written by the Hebrews.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mickeyrory View Post
        We know that the Hebrew Scriptures refer to the Old Testament. My question is when we say Hebrew scriptures, do we mean the scriptures of the Hebrews or scripture that is written in the Hebrew language and that of course would be the O.T. The latter is what I always assumed. However, in reading about the Hellenistic and Hebraic Jews from various sites it seems that what was available even during the time of Jesus was Aramiac text and the Hebrew language had fallen into disuse. They spoke either Greek or Aramiac. Anyone know with certainty anything about this subject?
        The term "Hebrew Scriptures" was created as a neutral term to refer to those scriptures accepted by both Jews and Christians.

        From a Jewish perspective the term "Old Testament" is offensive, since they don't recognize any later testament.

        Since, in modern times both Jews and Christians derive their version of the "Hebrew Scriptures" from a Hebrew language text, it seemed appropriate.

        Comment


        • #5
          I always thought..

          and maybe I 'm wrong, Hebrew scriptures referred to any scripture that was written by Hebrews, and used by early believers who didn't have things like Paul's letters yet or say the book of Matthew to refer to.

          It is my impression that early believers like today, had pagan religions surrounding them, that had their own systems of belief and writings. When they turned to the Hebrew God, it was his Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures), and the preachers who taught from the Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures), who they looked to for written and verbal guidence.

          I am also under the impression that the language it was written in was considered proper Hebrew, which is the language that survived unlike it's street version known as Aramaic.

          I understand that Aramaic was to the Hebrew language like say Cockney English is to the English language. It was nothing more than a slang used by the more uneducated, and had a lot of alternate words that were made up (yet understood) and not necessicarily found in a Proper Hebrew dictionary. It is my impression that this is why Aramaic was lost as a language for the most part ,as there is no comprehensive record of it, like there is with Hebrew language through the Tanakh.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Serve-N-Protect View Post
            I understand that Aramaic was to the Hebrew language like say Cockney English is to the English language. It was nothing more than a slang used by the more uneducated, and had a lot of alternate words that were made up (yet understood) and not necessicarily found in a Proper Hebrew dictionary. It is my impression that this is why Aramaic was lost as a language for the most part ,as there is no comprehensive record of it, like there is with Hebrew language through the Tanakh.
            No, not really...

            Aramaic was a semitic language spoken over a wide area of what is now the Middle East and was originally the language the Aramaeans.

            It is related to Hebrew in rather the same way that Spanish is related to French.

            For many centuries Aramaic functioned as a lingua franca around the Middle East rather the way English does globally today.

            Hebrew was nothing more than a regional language spoken exclusively in Israel, Jews outside Israel in the Middle East (basically in modern Syria and Iraq) spoke Aramaic (which was basically the language of those areas).

            We can probably compare it to Polish and English. Nobody really speaks Polish outside of Poland, but many people in many countries speak English.

            Later Aramaic was replaced by Arabic.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Serve-N-Protect View Post
              It is my impression that this is why Aramaic was lost as a language for the most part ,as there is no comprehensive record of it, like there is with Hebrew language through the Tanakh.
              The Syrian Orthodox Christians still use the Aramaic language and scriptures in their liturgies.

              Comment

              Working...
              X