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  • Protestant Reformation

    On Oct 31th, 1517 Martin Luther in an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church. This bold move began a movement later to be called the Protestant (Pro-test-tant) Reformation. The mainstream Protestant Churches generally trace their separation from the Roman Catholic Church to this pivotal moment in church history, yet sadly most Christians know little if anything about this period in the history of the church militant.

    Therefore, I find this to be a good time of year to ask what does the Protestant Reformation mean to you? Who was involved, and how did the movement evolve in time?

    Many Blessings,
    RW

  • #2
    Originally posted by RogerW View Post
    On Oct 31th, 1517 Martin Luther in an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church. This bold move began a movement later to be called the Protestant (Pro-test-tant) Reformation. The mainstream Protestant Churches generally trace their separation from the Roman Catholic Church to this pivotal moment in church history, yet sadly most Christians know little if anything about this period in the history of the church militant.

    Therefore, I find this to be a good time of year to ask what does the Protestant Reformation mean to you? Who was involved, and how did the movement evolve in time?

    Many Blessings,
    RW
    I recently watched the movie 'Luther'...I think it was from the 70's and it starred Stacey Keach. I learned so much from watching that movie, plus a greater appreciation for what Luther did. He was a troubled & tortured soul trying to please men & God through the RCC, but only when he understood true biblical grace did he come alive. As a result, God used him to turn this world upside down for Christ. I thank God for Martin Luther!!

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    • #3
      As a result of studying church history for quite a few years, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that "a reformation of some sort" simply WAS going to happen.

      The Roman Catholic Church - at that time & place in history - was so corrupt, so powerful and so unGodly, that something WAS going to happen. Luther was kind of a point man, but there was fever-pitch discontent and angst throughout the Church, and any one of the men such as Calvin, Hus, Zwingli, etc. could have been "Luther".

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jeafl
        As an anti-Semite, in typical German fashion, and as an authoritarian, again in typical German fashion, Martin Luther was ill suited to launch a movement on behalf of human freedom.

        In my view the real founders of the Protestant Reformation are men like Hus and Wycliffe.
        Absolute contributors, no argument here.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jeffreys View Post
          As a result of studying church history for quite a few years, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that "a reformation of some sort" simply WAS going to happen.

          The Roman Catholic Church - at that time & place in history - was so corrupt, so powerful and so unGodly, that something WAS going to happen. Luther was kind of a point man, but there was fever-pitch discontent and angst throughout the Church, and any one of the men such as Calvin, Hus, Zwingli, etc. could have been "Luther".
          Yeah, the providence of God! His church had become abominable, and God interceded on her behalf as He has throughout history.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sold Out View Post
            I recently watched the movie 'Luther'...I think it was from the 70's and it starred Stacey Keach. I learned so much from watching that movie, plus a greater appreciation for what Luther did. He was a troubled & tortured soul trying to please men & God through the RCC, but only when he understood true biblical grace did he come alive. As a result, God used him to turn this world upside down for Christ. I thank God for Martin Luther!!
            There is actually another, more modern Luther movie out that was really quite good. You might enquire it was released probably somewhere within the last decade? I too have become very fond of Luther.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jeafl
              As an anti-Semite, in typical German fashion, and as an authoritarian, again in typical German fashion, Martin Luther was ill suited to launch a movement on behalf of human freedom.
              Luther's "anti-Semitism" is an anachronistic label put onto him by our post-WWII eyes. Agreed, he says some things that make us shudder, but Luther's disgust for those that crucified the Christ should be the same disgust that we have. If only we hated sin as much as Martin Luther (the sinner).

              EDIT: In answer to the question, the Reformation means pretty much nothing to the church today. We've abandoned almost everything that the Reformers stood for, and in doing so made the Christian/Papist lines ever so blurry.
              Last edited by ProjectPeter; Oct 8th 2007, 10:32 PM. Reason: deleted insulting comment
              What is thy only comfort in life and death?

              That I with body and soul, both in life and death, am not my own, but belong unto my faithful Saviour Jesus Christ; who, with his precious blood, has fully satisfied for all my sins, and delivered me from all the power of the devil; and so preserves me that without the will of my heavenly Father, not a hair can fall from my head; yea, that all things must be subservient to my salvation, and therefore, by his Holy Spirit, He also assures me of eternal life, and makes me sincerely willing and ready, henceforth, to live unto him.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RogerW View Post
                Absolute contributors, no argument here.
                Compared to what the Roman Catholic Church did to people like Wycliffe and Hus, Lutherís life was a dream. Any idea that Luther suffered for the sake of the Lord is a myth.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RogerW View Post
                  On Oct 31th, 1517 Martin Luther in an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church. This bold move began a movement later to be called the Protestant (Pro-test-tant) Reformation. The mainstream Protestant Churches generally trace their separation from the Roman Catholic Church to this pivotal moment in church history, yet sadly most Christians know little if anything about this period in the history of the church militant.

                  Therefore, I find this to be a good time of year to ask what does the Protestant Reformation mean to you? Who was involved, and how did the movement evolve in time?

                  Many Blessings,
                  RW
                  The time was ripe for the period known as the Reformation. The Popish Church with all her abuses made the Reformation necessary. And the Reformation indeed began a good work. The sad part about the Reformation is that even to this day it remains only a partial Reformation. There has really been no real progress in the Reformation since the 17th century. In other words the Reformation remains incomplete. At the Snyod of Dort, a complete Reformation was stifled by narrow minded individuals, none of who could ever reach full agreement.

                  .
                  Last edited by DSK; Oct 9th 2007, 12:17 PM.
                  If you believe what you like in the gospel, and reject what you don't like, it is not the gospel you believe, but yourself. - Augustine

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DSK View Post
                    The time was ripe for the period known as the Reformation. The Popish Church with all her abuses made the Reformation necesarry. And the Reformation indeed began a good work. The sad part about the Reformation is that even to this day it remains only a partial Reformation. There has really been no real progress in the Reformation since the 17th century. In other words the Reformation remains incomplete. At the Snyod of Dort, a complete Reformation was stifled by narrow minded individuals, none of who could ever reach full agreement.

                    .
                    What additional reforms do you see as being necessary?

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                    • #11
                      Lets put a big "whoa mule" on the direction this thread is heading. Either ya'll start talking reformation instead of talking who is anti semetic or not or the thread is going to be shut down. If you have a problem with this, don't voice it here. Please start a thread in Chat to the Moderators to my attention.

                      1st John 3:14 We know that we have passed from death unto life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not his brother abideth in death.

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                      • #12
                        To answer the OP:

                        The mainstream Protestant Reformation did nothing more than transfer churches from the control of the Pope and Rome to the control of the local monarchs.

                        It was as authoritarian as ever, it is just the loyalty, and money, was redirected to local powers.

                        Even today mainline Protestants blur the line between loyalty to the church and loyalty to the state, with (in the US at least) national flags appearing in churches, and the elevation of the 4th of July to practically a religious holiday.

                        The mainstream Protestant Reformation has little to recommend for itself.

                        The Radical Reformation (the Anabaptists and such), who were opposed vehemently by the mainstream Protestant leaders like Luther, had quite a bit to recommend themsleves.

                        It is telling that one of the few things the Roman Catholics and the Reformers could agree on was that the Radical Reformation needed to be violently rooted out.

                        It is probably also telling that they could also agree on their hatred for the Jews.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SemperReformanda View Post
                          EDIT: In answer to the question, the Reformation means pretty much nothing to the church today. We've abandoned almost everything that the Reformers stood for, and in doing so made the Christian/Papist lines ever so blurry.
                          Out of curiosity, what do you mean? Could you clarify a bit?

                          Thanks!

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                          • #14
                            While I'm not a great fan of Martin Luther he does at least deserve credit for trying - in the early years of his ministry - for trying to restore Bible teaching in "soul sleep" as it is miscalled. Ultimately however he had to go quiet on the subject as Bible teaching concerning the mortality of man was not consistent with the state-church he became involved in building.

                            . . . that he [the pope] is emperor of the world and king of heaven, and earthly god; that the soul is immortal, and all these endless monstrous fictions in the Roman rubbish heap of decretals."

                            "For just as a man who falls asleep and sleeps soundly until morning does not know what has happened to him when he wakes up, so we shall suddenly rise on the Last Day, and we shall know neither what death has been like or how we have come through it. We are to sleep until he comes and knocks on the grave and says, 'Dr. Martin, get up.' Then I will arise in a moment and will be eternally happy with him."


                            He initially used that discovery to criticise limbo, indulgences, prayer to saints, Mary, and so on, but later discovered how useful the immortality of the soul is in holding together a national rather than individual religion. No one who wants to be a popular religious leader is going to get far preaching that "the dead know nothing".
                            God bless
                            Steven

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jeafl View Post
                              What additional reforms do you see as being necessary?
                              A great window of opportunity was available to those who took part in the reformation to come away from all the false teachings of the church of Rome. The Reformers, did come away from many of the errors of the Catholic Church, but still had need to continue developing correct Biblical doctrine. The developing of correct doctrine came to an end at the Synod of Dort, and today there is need to further develop correct doctrine and fully return to Biblical truth. The same underdeveloped midevel teachings that the 17th century Reformers embraced and taught are still being taught by the majority today. In other words the Reformers came a long distance, but they didn't Reform as far as they should have, and in my opinion it is having it's effects on the church today.
                              If you believe what you like in the gospel, and reject what you don't like, it is not the gospel you believe, but yourself. - Augustine

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