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Did Jesus worship God?

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  • Did Jesus worship God?

    Also I thought Jesus was GOD in the flesh.. So does that mean he worshipped himself? Bit of a paradox goin' on there when people say he's the son of God but also God...

  • #2
    the answer would be yes
    Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
    C. S. Lewis

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Scottizzle View Post
      Also I thought Jesus was GOD in the flesh.. So does that mean he worshipped himself? Bit of a paradox goin' on there when people say he's the son of God but also God...
      Of course he did. He was the son of God but He was also the Son of man. He worshipped God through prayer, for example. He prayed to God often and prayer is a form of worship
      Amazzin

      Obedience to God is more than a soldier obeying his commander. It is our grateful response to the Lover of our souls.

      CHURCH: Where worship is enjoyed, not endured - Grace is preached, not legalism - And Christ is exalted, not religion!



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      • #4
        The way He worshiped set the example for us, how we're to worship and lead a Christlike life as close as "we" can.
        Slug1--out

        ~"In the turmoil of any chaos, all it takes is that whisper that is heard like thunder over all the noise and the chaos seems to go away, focus returns and we are comforted in knowing that God has listened to our cry for help."~

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        • #5
          I believe your answer is in Philipians 2:5-9

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          • #6
            The Trinity states that: (1) there is only one God by nature (2) there are three Persons (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) who all share the divine nature (3) and that all three Persons are distinct.

            Jesus, the Son, in His incarnation took upon Himself a human nature and was 100% God and 100% man. When He worshiped God was he worshipping Himself? When He was praying to God was He praying to Himself? No, in His human nature he was worshipping the Father who was God, because that is the proper duty of man.
            If any created mind would fain see the Glory of God, he need not gaze upon the starry skies, nor soar into the Heaven of heavens! He has but to bow at the cross-foot and watch the crimson streams which gush from Immanuel’s wounds! Charles Spurgeon (The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bunyan's Pilgrim View Post
              The Trinity states that: (1) there is only one God by nature (2) there are three Persons (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) who all share the divine nature (3) and that all three Persons are distinct.

              Jesus, the Son, in His incarnation took upon Himself a human nature and was 100% God and 100% man. When He worshiped God was he worshipping Himself? When He was praying to God was He praying to Himself? No, in His human nature he was worshipping the Father who was God, because that is the proper duty of man.

              That kind of gets back to the same question... God as a man was worshipping himself.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scottizzle View Post
                That kind of gets back to the same question... God as a man was worshipping himself.
                You're running around in a circle. It was already explained that everything Jesus did was for an example to us, that we might lead a proper life. We do so by following His example. And then there is the life example of the Trinity. My wife, my son and I made a complete family. My wife got me out of bed, fed me, washed my clothes and much more and yet she lived to serve me more. My son was and is the delight of my life and yet he wants nothing more than to eventually be just like me. Those are, minor yes, but they are forms of worship, but why? We were all the one family. Jesus was God in the flesh and yet He was not the Father. There is no paradox, you just haven't lived long enough, I guess, to see life clearly yet.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Scottizzle View Post
                  That kind of gets back to the same question... God as a man was worshipping himself.
                  The third point above in the definition of the Trinity states that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are separate and distinct Persons. Another way of saying that is this: The Father IS NOT the Son. The Son IS NOT the Father. So when Jesus prays to the Father, He is not praying to Himself because He is not the Father.

                  When we observe our blessed Lord in the Gospels and how He interacted with the Father, we do not want to fall into modalism.
                  Modalism is a denial of the Trinity which states that God is a single person who, throughout biblical history, has revealed Himself in three modes, or forms. Thus, God is a single person who first manifested himself in the mode of the Father in Old Testament times. At the incarnation, the mode was the Son. After Jesus' ascension, the mode is the Holy Spirit. These modes are consecutive and never simultaneous. In other words, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit never all exist at the same time, only one after another. Modalism denies the distinctiveness of the three persons in the Trinity even though it retains the divinity of Christ. Because a modalist believes that Jesus and the Father are the same Person, they look at Jesus praying to the Father in the gospels and conclude that Jesus was praying to Himself. A modalist denies the third point in the definition of the Trinity as defined by classical Christianity.
                  If any created mind would fain see the Glory of God, he need not gaze upon the starry skies, nor soar into the Heaven of heavens! He has but to bow at the cross-foot and watch the crimson streams which gush from Immanuel’s wounds! Charles Spurgeon (The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by th1bill View Post
                    You're running around in a circle. It was already explained that everything Jesus did was for an example to us, that we might lead a proper life. We do so by following His example. And then there is the life example of the Trinity. My wife, my son and I made a complete family. My wife got me out of bed, fed me, washed my clothes and much more and yet she lived to serve me more. My son was and is the delight of my life and yet he wants nothing more than to eventually be just like me. Those are, minor yes, but they are forms of worship, but why? We were all the one family. Jesus was God in the flesh and yet He was not the Father. There is no paradox, you just haven't lived long enough, I guess, to see life clearly yet.

                    Uhm, so let's straighten this out...

                    Jesus worshipped God in Heaven, but Jesus is God in the flesh, but is also the son of God, which would make himself the son of himself... I'm not running around in a circle I'm just trying to get one of you to explain it so you don't just say "Yes. Those are true." I am wondering... I thought Jesus was the son of God and worshipped his father God in heaven. Thats how I thought it was...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Scottizzle View Post
                      Uhm, so let's straighten this out...

                      Jesus worshipped God in Heaven, but Jesus is God in the flesh, but is also the son of God, which would make himself the son of himself... I'm not running around in a circle I'm just trying to get one of you to explain it so you don't just say "Yes. Those are true." I am wondering... I thought Jesus was the son of God and worshipped his father God in heaven. Thats how I thought it was...
                      You have a modalistic view of the nature of God. Please read my above post.
                      If any created mind would fain see the Glory of God, he need not gaze upon the starry skies, nor soar into the Heaven of heavens! He has but to bow at the cross-foot and watch the crimson streams which gush from Immanuel’s wounds! Charles Spurgeon (The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit)

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                      • #12
                        Perhaps that Jesus was fully man, yet fully God, makes it difficult to comprehend..It does for me anyway.
                        Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
                        C. S. Lewis

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Scottizzle View Post
                          Uhm, so let's straighten this out...

                          Jesus worshipped God in Heaven, but Jesus is God in the flesh, but is also the son of God, which would make himself the son of himself... I'm not running around in a circle I'm just trying to get one of you to explain it so you don't just say "Yes. Those are true." I am wondering... I thought Jesus was the son of God and worshipped his father God in heaven. Thats how I thought it was...
                          I know it can be a difficult concept, Scott: We're human, so we know existence in this one form, on this one plane, except when we believe in ghosts.

                          Christ is one part of God's identity. Christ worshiped His other 2 parts. He gave up His right to be worshiped when He volunteered to become flesh as atonement for our sins.

                          Think of it like this: We have a brain, and we have a heart. Neither can exist without the other: The brain tells the heart to pump, which sends oxygenated blood to the brain so that the brain stays alive to tell the heart to stay alive. Without all 3 (brain, heart, blood), we die; 2 of the same heart won't keep us alive, and neither will we live if we remove 1 part of the chain.

                          The brain and the heart makes us alive. But they are two totally different organs - they don't look alike, they don't serve the same function, they are totally different. But they are both us, or at least that part of us that lives.

                          Just as we are we because we have a heart and a brain, so is God because He has 3 parts - they are all His "we," but they don't look alike, they serve different functions (to an extent, of course - remember, we are trying to analogize an omnipotent God with human things), they are different, but they are ONE. One cannot survive without the other.

                          When Jesus came to Earth, He willingly separated Himself from the rest of Him: Essentially, He was able to remove the brain from the heart and yet somehow, He survived. We can't explain this, because we just don't understand this separation as separated but still together. Our minds cannot comprehend this seemingly opposable concept. How can 1 thing be three parts with 1 part removed? But that is God, and nothing is beyond God's ability to do - including denying fact as we understand it.

                          What Jesus did was separate Himself (the heart) from His other pieces, God (the brain), and the Holy Spirit (the blood). Prayer was Jesus using the Spirit to communicate with God. The heart used the blood to feed the brain, the brain used the blood to keep the heart alive.

                          This really isn't coming out the way I wanted. I'm sorry, I'm trying. Bear with me just a bit more, my friend.

                          When Jesus came to Earth, He basically gave up being God for a while. Because He still IS God, He couldn't sin and deny His own nature. But He gave up everything else - He became just like us, where He needed prayer to be in communication WITH God. He was still 1/3 OF God, He just denied all privileges of the power so He would be, essentially, a Human Being, needing prayer to talk to His other 2/3rds.

                          We call God "The Father" and Jesus "The Son" because there is no Human word for being the exact same thing but as a piece of that exact same thing.

                          So no, Jesus wasn't praying to Himself, as God does not worship flesh, and Christ became flesh. In His ministry here, Jesus never told us He worshiped Himself - He worshiped His Father, as He was now flesh, and The Father was still 100% pure God.

                          When Jesus prayed, He restored the line of communication He willingly broke - just as without prayer we have no communication lines with God, so it was with Jesus in the flesh. He was missing a part of Himself, and prayer restored that communication. The flesh of Jesus worshiped God, again, just as we do.

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                          • #14
                            Clear case for moving this topic? A forum for guys talking about guy things? Unless we are saying Jesus was a guy, God is a guy??? (3 question marks for the trinity?) and we're all guys - i hope! The Holy Spirit is male? Let's take this to the correct forum, where's a moderator when you need one?
                            1 Corinthians 1:12-13 Now this I say, that every one of you saith, I am of Paul; and I of Apollos: and I of Cephas; and I of Christ.

                            Is Christ divided? was Paul crucified for you? or were ye baptised in the name of Paul?

                            KJV

                            May the power of the Spirit of our God unite us. SofTy.

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                            • #15
                              In my study of John's gospel i have something to help or confuse this issue even more. God is made up of 3 parts, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. All parts are seperate while one. But here's a lovely thought from my study guide - 2 parts are not greater than 1. They are the same. So if you seperate the 3 parts they are all equal. But if you take any 2 together and the other seperately they are also equal. Please someone explain that to me. I believe some 'thinkers' think too much!
                              1 Corinthians 1:12-13 Now this I say, that every one of you saith, I am of Paul; and I of Apollos: and I of Cephas; and I of Christ.

                              Is Christ divided? was Paul crucified for you? or were ye baptised in the name of Paul?

                              KJV

                              May the power of the Spirit of our God unite us. SofTy.

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