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  • Passover

    Fenris, if you read this, please help me out. I'd like to observe Passover this year, in some way. What would you suggest for a beginner?

    Others who observe it may also post, of course!
    Blessings,

    Road Warrior


    Proverbs 4:23
    23 Guard your heart above all else,
    for it determines the course of your life.

  • #2
    Originally posted by RoadWarrior View Post
    Fenris, if you read this, please help me out. I'd like to observe Passover this year, in some way. What would you suggest for a beginner?

    Others who observe it may also post, of course!
    Why do you want to observe it? I mean, its ok for a learning experience. I just wondered what was your motivation.

    2Witnesses

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 2Witnesses View Post
      Why do you want to observe it? I mean, its ok for a learning experience. I just wondered what was your motivation.

      2Witnesses

      Because I just studied Mark. And I'm sad that Easter is so disconnected from Passover.
      Blessings,

      Road Warrior


      Proverbs 4:23
      23 Guard your heart above all else,
      for it determines the course of your life.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by RoadWarrior View Post
        Because I just studied Mark. And I'm sad that Easter is so disconnected from Passover.
        I am not sure what you mean by that. But yes, some have allowed pagan influence to be associated with, not Passover, but the Lord's Supper.

        Passover pointed to our passover, which is Christ. And the Supper pictured the fulfilled Passover. It pictured the New Covenant. That not with the blood of a passover lamb, blood on the post. But by His blood on the tree.

        The blood was put on the door post because the door signifies entrance. It was the access into one's house. And it is the picture of the heart of a person. Belief or unbelief is the keeper of the house. But He says, 'Behold, I stand at the door and knock.'

        2Witnesses

        Comment


        • #5
          Roadwarrior, I'll get back to you on this.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Fenris View Post
            Roadwarrior, I'll get back to you on this.
            Thanks. I look forward to your thoughts.
            Blessings,

            Road Warrior


            Proverbs 4:23
            23 Guard your heart above all else,
            for it determines the course of your life.

            Comment


            • #7
              And this day shall become a memorial for you, and you shall observe it as a festival for the L-RD, for your generations, as an eternal decree shall you observe it. For seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, but on the first day you shall remove the leaven from your homes ... you shall guard the unleavened bread, because on this very day I will take you out of the land of Egypt; you shall observe this day for your generations as an eternal decree. - Exodus 12:14-17

              Passover signifies the event that was the birth of the Jewish people. Because God Himself took our ancestors from Egypt, with open miracles, God has the right to demand so much more from us than He does from any other people.

              So let's examine the specific practices of the holiday. First we have the prohibition on retaining any leavened bread. In the most obvious sense, this is part of the remembrance of the Exodus; the Jews fled Egypt so quickly that their bread did not have time to rise. In a more subtle sense, it's about us removing the puffiness or haughtiness from our persona, and reminding ourselves of the importance of humility.

              Then we have the Seder. The Seder has many symbolic acts and customs, all there to remind us of the Exodus.

              Comment


              • #8
                The order of the Seder (which actually means 'order!) I have borrowed the details from another site. Many of the details of the Seder are specifically unusual so that children are confused and ask questions.

                1. Kaddesh: Sanctification
                A blessing over wine in honor of the holiday. The wine is drunk, and a second cup is poured.

                2. Urechatz: Washing
                A washing of the hands without a blessing, in preparation for eating the Karpas.

                3. Karpas: Vegetable

                A vegetable (usually parsley) is dipped in salt water and eaten. The vegetable symbolizes the lowly origins of the Jewish people; the salt water symbolizes the tears shed as a result of our slavery. Parsley is a good vegetable to use for this purpose, because when you shake off the salt water, it looks like tears.

                4. Yachatz: Breaking

                One of the three matzahs on the table is broken. Part is returned to the pile, the other part is set aside for the afikomen (see below).

                5. Maggid: The Story

                A retelling of the story of the Exodus from Egypt and the first Pesach. This begins with the youngest person asking The Four Questions, a set of questions about the proceedings designed to encourage participation in the seder. The Four Questions are also known as Mah Nishtanah (Why is it different?), which are the first words of the Four Questions. This is often sung.

                The maggid is designed to satisfy the needs of four different types of people: the wise one, who wants to know the technical details; the wicked one, who excludes himself (and learns the penalty for doing so); the simple one, who needs to know the basics; and the one who is unable to ask, who doesn't even know enough to know what he needs to know.

                At the end of the maggid, a blessing is recited over the second cup of wine and it is drunk.

                6. Rachtzah: Washing
                A second washing of the hands, this time with a blessing, in preparation for eating the matzah

                7. Motzi: Blessing over Grain Products

                The ha-motzi blessing, a generic blessing for bread or grain products used as a meal, is recited over the matzah.

                8. Matzah: Blessing over Matzah
                A blessing specific to matzah is recited, and a bit of matzah is eaten.

                9. Maror: Bitter Herbs

                A blessing is recited over a bitter vegetable (usually raw horseradish; sometimes romaine lettuce), and it is eaten. This symbolizes the bitterness of slavery. The maror is dipped in charoset, a mixture of apples, nuts, cinnamon and wine, which symbolizes the mortar used by the Jews in building during their slavery.


                10. Korekh: The Sandwich
                Rabbi Hillel was of the opinion that the maror should be eaten together with matzah and the paschal offering in a sandwich. In his honor, we eat some maror on a piece of matzah, with some charoset (we don't do animal sacrifice anymore, so there is no paschal offering to eat).

                11. Shulchan Orekh: Dinner
                A festive meal is eaten. There is no particular requirement regarding what to eat at this meal (except, of course, that chametz cannot be eaten). Among Ashkenazic Jews, gefilte fish and matzah ball soup are traditionally eaten at the beginning of the meal. Roast chicken or turkey are common as a main course, as is beef brisket.

                12. Tzafun: The Afikomen
                The piece of matzah set aside earlier is eaten as "desert," the last food of the meal. Different families have different traditions relating to the afikomen. Some have the children hide it, while the parents have to either find it or ransom it back. Others have the parents hide it. The idea is to keep the children awake and attentive throughout the pre-meal proceedings, waiting for this part.

                13. Barekh: Grace after Meals
                The third cup of wine is poured, and birkat ha-mazon (grace after meals) is recited. This is similar to the grace that would be said on any Shabbat. At the end, a blessing is said over the third cup and it is drunk. The fourth cup is poured, including a cup set aside for the prophet Elijah, who is supposed to herald the Messiah, and is supposed to come on Pesach to do this. The door is opened for a while at this point .

                14. Hallel: Praises

                Several psalms are recited. A blessing is recited over the last cup of wine and it is drunk.

                15. Nirtzah: Closing
                A simple statement that the seder has been completed, with a wish that next year, we may celebrate Pesach in Jerusalem (i.e., that the Messiah will come within the next year). This is followed by various hymns and stories.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you so much, Fenris. This is helpful to me. I have some questions.

                  I'd like for you to talk about the days. I saw on a calendar website that Passover this year begins on the 20th of April and ends on the 26th. (I assume that is sundown on the 19th, to sundown on the 26th.)

                  I'd also like for you to talk about the candles.
                  Blessings,

                  Road Warrior


                  Proverbs 4:23
                  23 Guard your heart above all else,
                  for it determines the course of your life.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    sunset April 19, 2008 - nightfall April 27, 2008

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What is the difference between sunset and nightfall? Are the candles lit at sunset?
                      Blessings,

                      Road Warrior


                      Proverbs 4:23
                      23 Guard your heart above all else,
                      for it determines the course of your life.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sunset is when the sun goes below the horizon. Nightfall is about 42 minutes later.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Fenris View Post
                          Sunset is when the sun goes below the horizon. Nightfall is about 42 minutes later.

                          Would to God, we all knew the time, and the times. How many of these, till he understands?

                          I watched, as the sun went away. And darkness came. Did I fear? Did I curse the darkness?

                          Lord, Eli, pass over my house. Covah! Do not see! For Your lovingkindess endures forever.

                          It is enough!

                          2Witnesses

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 2Witnesses View Post
                            Would to God, we all knew the time, and the times. How many of these, till he understands?

                            I watched, as the sun went away. And darkness came. Did I fear? Did I curse the darkness?

                            Lord, Eli, pass over my house. Covah! Do not see! For Your lovingkindess endures forever.

                            It is enough!

                            2Witnesses
                            Pardon me, but what on earth are you talking about? And how does it contribute to the original topic of this thread?

                            We're having a perfectly polite discussion on a Jewish holiday. What are you doing?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 2Witnesses View Post
                              Why do you want to observe it? I mean, its ok for a learning experience. I just wondered what was your motivation.

                              2Witnesses
                              Probably the same reason any Christian would want to 'observe' Easter.
                              And this day shall become a memorial for you, and you shall observe it as a festival for the L-RD,
                              Passover is a memorial festival, a time of celebrating what God did for Israel. For the Christian, it is that, but ALSO the celebration of what the True Lamb of God did for all mankind.
                              Nothing wrong with celebrating that, 2W. Why would you NOT want to?

                              Comment

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