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  • Why was the Day of Atonement special?

    What's the difference between Lev. 4:13-15 and Lev. 9:7ff, and Lev. 16? I guess I'm unsure of the significance of the Day of Atonement, since all of Israel could have their sins atoned for any day, and not just once a year? By the way, I'd really rather stay clear of how Jesus fulfilled this and that; I really just want to stick with the OT. Thanks! - Lk.11
    Last edited by Nihil Obstat; Apr 5th 2008, 08:30 PM. Reason: added another sentence
    analyze. synthesize. repeat.

    *It is the next chapter of my life, whether I'm ready or not. My time here in these forums has come to its close. I bless you as I go!*

  • #2
    ECHO! Echo! Echo! echo!

    Anyone out there? This is a discussion forum, right?
    analyze. synthesize. repeat.

    *It is the next chapter of my life, whether I'm ready or not. My time here in these forums has come to its close. I bless you as I go!*

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    • #3
      Why did the *high* priest have to go into the *Most* Holy Place to atone for the sins of Israel *once* a year (Lev. 16) when *any* priest could do this *outside* the inner most room *any* day of the year (Lev. 4:13-15; 9:7)??? Am I missing something obvious?
      analyze. synthesize. repeat.

      *It is the next chapter of my life, whether I'm ready or not. My time here in these forums has come to its close. I bless you as I go!*

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      • #4
        I am no Jewish theologian, scholar of the Law, or anything, but I would have to say that the Day of Atonement was different from just the average atoning for sins because the people did not have to scarfice anything on the Day of Atonement, only the priests. Other then that the Day of Atonement was a catchall, if the people had sinned and not realized it or did not have the funds to make a sacrifice then this day gave them forgiveness for the sins they did not know about or the ones they could not afford to make atonement for. After a while doves and other animals can get pretty expensive when all you do is farm or herd sheep. I hope that helps.

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        • #5
          Well, even if they didn't have the means to sacrifice an animal, they could bring fine flour. And I don't think that it's a "catch all", because the first two references are very similar to Lev. 16's special day in that very way. Anyone else?
          analyze. synthesize. repeat.

          *It is the next chapter of my life, whether I'm ready or not. My time here in these forums has come to its close. I bless you as I go!*

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi there.
            I will try to explain as clear as I can. During the religious year, the people daily brought sacrifices as an atonement for their sins. As they confessed their sins over the head of the animal and killed the sacrifice, the sins of the penitent were transferred to the blood of the victim. This blood was then taken by the priest and transferred to the sanctuary where it was sprinkled upon the altar of incense before the veil. Thus the sins remained upon the altar in the Holy Place.
            Each subsequent sacrifice repeated the process for each and every person of Israel. Thus the sins of the whole nation was laid upon the altar by the end of the religious calender year.
            On the day of atonement, the time came for the sanctuary to be cleansed. A sacrifice of a bullock was offered for the High Priest, and a goat for the sins of the nation,another which was presented live before the Lord.
            The blood of the goat and the bullock was taken into the Most Holy Place and was sprinkled before the Ark of the Covenant. This had the symbolic effect of cleansing the entire sanctuary and the people of all the sins that had been deposited there throughout the year.
            The High Priest then carried that sin and confessed them upon the head of the live goat which was then led into the wilderness to die a natural death.
            Thus all of the nation, and the sanctuary, was clean. It was so important that everyone show up and confess and repent of sin that day. They were cut off from Israel if they did not. It was the most solemn day of the religious calender, a day of mourning and repentance. Jewish tradition refers to it as a judgement day.
            As you allude to, there is a antitypical day of atonement in the heavenly sanctuary.This is the last act by Jesus before the second coming. But I will go no further with this to keep your OP on track as you desired.
            Jeremiah 15:16 Thy words were found, and I did eat them; and thy word was unto me the joy and
            rejoicing of mine heart: for I am called by thy name, O LORD God of hosts.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by brakelite View Post
              Hi there.
              I will try to explain as clear as I can. During the religious year, the people daily brought sacrifices as an atonement for their sins. As they confessed their sins over the head of the animal and killed the sacrifice, the sins of the penitent were transferred to the blood of the victim. This blood was then taken by the priest and transferred to the sanctuary where it was sprinkled upon the altar of incense before the veil. Thus the sins remained upon the altar in the Holy Place.
              Each subsequent sacrifice repeated the process for each and every person of Israel. Thus the sins of the whole nation was laid upon the altar by the end of the religious calender year.
              On the day of atonement, the time came for the sanctuary to be cleansed. A sacrifice of a bullock was offered for the High Priest, and a goat for the sins of the nation,another which was presented live before the Lord.
              The blood of the goat and the bullock was taken into the Most Holy Place and was sprinkled before the Ark of the Covenant. This had the symbolic effect of cleansing the entire sanctuary and the people of all the sins that had been deposited there throughout the year.
              The High Priest then carried that sin and confessed them upon the head of the live goat which was then led into the wilderness to die a natural death.
              Thus all of the nation, and the sanctuary, was clean. It was so important that everyone show up and confess and repent of sin that day. They were cut off from Israel if they did not. It was the most solemn day of the religious calender, a day of mourning and repentance. Jewish tradition refers to it as a judgement day.
              As you allude to, there is a antitypical day of atonement in the heavenly sanctuary.This is the last act by Jesus before the second coming. But I will go no further with this to keep your OP on track as you desired.
              Thank you thank you thank you! That makes SO much sense!

              Now... was Barabbas, the rebellious murderer, the scapegoat? Or does Jesus fulfill both goats, as well as the high priest?
              analyze. synthesize. repeat.

              *It is the next chapter of my life, whether I'm ready or not. My time here in these forums has come to its close. I bless you as I go!*

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              • #8
                Yom Kippur is still the most holy days of the Jewish Year. This is a very interesting thread, i never thought about Barrabas being the scapegoat to go into the wilderness to die a natural death.
                I once read something about what the name Barabbas means, and that may clarify it some more. I will see if i can find it.

                Shalom,
                Tanja
                Jer 6:16 Thus says the Lord: Stand at the crossroads, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way lies; and walk in it, and find rest for your souls.
                2Jn 1:9 Everyone who goes on ahead and does not abide in the teaching of Christ, does not have God. Whoever abides in the teaching has both the Father and the Son.
                If it's not done out of unselfish love, then it's hardly righteous.
                http://disciple2yeshua.wordpress.com/



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                • #9
                  Originally posted by astrongerthanhe View Post
                  Thank you thank you thank you! That makes SO much sense!

                  Now... was Barabbas, the rebellious murderer, the scapegoat? Or does Jesus fulfill both goats, as well as the high priest?
                  No, Barabbas was not the scape goat. Barabbas is a type of you and me. Though guilty, he was set free. Though innocent, Jesus died. No sins were laid on Barabbas, they were laid upon Jesus.

                  Jesus, as our High Priest, now ministers in the sanctuary in heaven. He, just as the High Priest was in the OT, acts as Mediator between the Father and Israel, the church. He was the sacrifice yes, but not the scape goat.

                  When He finishes His mediation and returns to earth for His purchased and redeemed possession,He comes with all the sins of mankind symbolically in His possession. And as the High Priest on the day of atonement laid them all upon the scape goat, so Jesus will lay all the sins upon Satan, who will be bound and led away to bear his responsibility for all that has taken place since his rebellion, and will finally be cast into the lake of fire at the end of the 1000 years.
                  Jeremiah 15:16 Thy words were found, and I did eat them; and thy word was unto me the joy and
                  rejoicing of mine heart: for I am called by thy name, O LORD God of hosts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry, I have to disagree with Brakelite. The Israelites' sins were forgiven each time they offered an individual sin offering (which was not necessarily every day for every individual, but when necessary) and when God accepted their offering. The regular priests placed the offering upon the altar. It was the elevation offering (Tamid offering) that was offered both morning and evening, but it was not for sin. The Day of Atonement is different in the sense that the Cohen HaGadol (the High Priest) was only allowed in the Holy of Holies one day of the year, which was the Day of Atonement. It was the Cohen HaGadol that more specifically represented Y'shua and His role being the sin sacrifice once and for all. Only His blood and only He could enter the Holy of Holies to present His sacrifice for cleansing. The Day of Atonement, rather than being a day was for all individuals to finally have their sins forgiven was a day for all of Israel to stand before God as a corporate nation and ask for forgiveness for the sins of the whole community.

                    Blessings,
                    BHS

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                    • #11
                      I agree that individuals were forgiven as they repented and offered sacrifice. However therecord of their sins were not removed til the Day of Atonement, when they were placed upon the scapegoat.
                      We also are forgiven, but the record of our sins still remain upon the books of heaven until the consummation of all things. We are forgiven the moment we accept and believe and trust in the atoning sacrifice of the 'Lamb of God'. Jesus still bears our sins however; so long as He remains in the sanctuary, we have opportunity for forgiveness. Once He leaves and returns to earth to gather His bride from all corners of the globe, His role as High Priest will have ceased, the sanctuary will be closed to further mediation, and there will be no further opportunity for those still in their sin to find salvation. That is why these last days are such a solemn time for all the inhabitants of the earth. That is why we must share the gospel with all we can. We are living in the antitypical day of atonement, our High Priest will soon be leaving the sanctuary and returning to earth . His role as Mediator and Priest will cease and He will return as King of Kings.
                      Jeremiah 15:16 Thy words were found, and I did eat them; and thy word was unto me the joy and
                      rejoicing of mine heart: for I am called by thy name, O LORD God of hosts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Again, I disagree, but further comment will have to come later if you are interested. God took great pains to keep the children of Israel from defiling the Tabernacle. This was the purpose of the mikveh (washing) and some of the offerings. Therefore, I do not believe their sins were carried into the sanctuary waiting for the Day of Atonement to expunge the record of their sin or to cleanse the Tabernacle from them when God's purpose was that it not be defiled at all!

                        Blessings,
                        BHS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by astrongerthanhe View Post
                          What's the difference between Lev. 4:13-15 and Lev. 9:7ff, and Lev. 16? I guess I'm unsure of the significance of the Day of Atonement, since all of Israel could have their sins atoned for any day, and not just once a year? By the way, I'd really rather stay clear of how Jesus fulfilled this and that; I really just want to stick with the OT. Thanks! - Lk.11
                          Leviticus 4:13-15 3 ¶ 'Now if the whole congregation of Israel commits error and the matter escapes the notice of the assembly, and they commit any of the things which the LORD has commanded not to be done, and they become guilty; 14 when the sin which they have committed becomes known, then the assembly shall offer a bull of the herd for a sin offering and bring it before the tent of meeting. 15 'Then the elders of the congregation shall lay their hands on the head of the bull before the LORD, and the bull shall be slain before the LORD.

                          Chapter 4 deals with sin done unintentionally either by the whole assembly, an individual leader or by a non-leader. Theses are sins done in error, inadvertently or done by mistake. This is not the sin of one who purposefully, out of a spirit of rebellion, breaks a commandment. It stems more from undisciplined obedience where the person may incorrectly carry out a command or neglect it. And therefore the passage describes the type of offering called a guilt offering.

                          Leviticus 9:7-11 7 Moses then said to Aaron, "Come near to the altar and offer your sin offering and your burnt offering, that you may make atonement for yourself and for the people; then make the offering for the people, that you may make atonement for them, just as the LORD has commanded." 8 ¶ So Aaron came near to the altar and slaughtered the calf of the sin offering which was for himself. 9 Aaron's sons presented the blood to him; and he dipped his finger in the blood and put some on the horns of the altar, and poured out the rest of the blood at the base of the altar. 10 The fat and the kidneys and the lobe of the liver of the sin offering, he then offered up in smoke on the altar just as the LORD had commanded Moses. 11 The flesh and the skin, however, he burned with fire outside the camp.

                          Chapter nine relates the first sacrifices for the congregation of Israel by the hand of Aaron and his sons, and the appearance of God’s glory in the Mishkan (Tabernacle), including the consuming fire that burned up the offering on the altar. In this passage the priests had to become clean first themselves before they could mediate for the people.

                          The primary issue of chapter nine is the appearance of God’s glory to the people in connection with the sacrifices and the service of Aaron and his sons as priests. God’s purpose in redeeming Israel was that He might dwell in her midst. Fellowship was God’s goal and could only be accomplished by having their sins removed so they could be considered “holy” in His sight. The sacrificial system was first and foremost a remedy for man’s sin and also a means by which God could dwell with man.

                          In Leviticus 16 God reveals to Moses the instructions for Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement), and particularly the manner in which the Cohen Gadol (High Priest) was to perform the sacred ceremonies of the day. Given the sacrificial system had been put in place with sin offerings for the people, I think your question is – why the Day of Atonement?.

                          The understanding of Leviticus 16 comes from a study done by Tim Hegg. The quotes are excerpts, but not necessarily an exact word for word quote.

                          The Day of Atonement was one of the Festivals that taught the Israelites about their coming Messiah. It offers a picture of what took place with Y’shua’s atonement. It is an annual reminder that nothing we can do of ourselves can close the gap in our relationship with a holy Lord. I know you said you wanted to stay clear of how Y'shua fulfilled the Day of Atonement, but that is what the Day of Atonement was all about -- a way of teaching the Israelites of their coming Messiah. Since the beginning of time, mankind has believed the lie that God’s way is not the only way. The Day of Atonement teaches us there is only one way of atonement, because there is only One God, and His holiness can be satisfied in only one way, that is, through sacrifice made by the appointed mediator. The laws given in this passage are a clear and specific foreshadow of the ultimate sacrifice mediated by the ultimate Cohen Gadol, the Anointed One, Yeshua.

                          The first law given is that Aaron is to enter the Most Holy place only on a particular day. If he were to enter any other time as an affront to God’s holiness, he would die. Here we learn that God has appointed a time for atonement. That the Cohen Gadol enters only once into the Most Holy place during this festival foreshadowed the coming of Yeshua at the appointed time to earth and once for all time become the final sin sacrifice.

                          “Each of the sacrifices corresponds to one aspect of Yeshua’s atonement for us. The Cohen Gadol begins by offering the bull of purification for himself and his household (v. 6). Here we are reminded that the Cohen Gadol, while a type of the coming Messiah, was nonetheless not qualified to affect the ultimate atonement, for he was himself in need of atonement. He was an imperfect representation of the Coming One Who would offer himself as atonement for His people, but Who was Himself pure and without need for personal atonement (cf. Heb 7:27).”

                          “With the application of the blood of the bull and the goat we are dealing with the purification sacrifices that atoned both for himself and for the people. The Cohen Gadol next offers the living goat. The two goats had already been brought before the Lord at the opening of the tent of meeting, where lots were cast to determine their respect roles (vv. 7–8). One goat was designated as the sin offering, and the other as “scapegoat.” The Cohen Gadol lays both of his hands upon the head of the goat and confesses all the sins of the people. Here we have a clear picture of the vicarious nature of the atonement. The innocent animal carries upon himself the guilt of the people.”

                          “The death of the sacrificial animal speaks to the payment for sin (justification = declared not guilty) while the carrying away of sin by the live goat speaks to a renewed life of holiness (sanctification). Payment for sin is not enough. God intends to redeem a people who, through His own grace, are made into a righteous dwelling fit for the King of glory.

                          “It is remarkable that the Cohen Gadol never contracts impurity even though he clearly transfers impurity to the scapegoat through the laying on of hands. The one who leads the goat to the wilderness, and the one who burns the remains of the sacrificial animals outside of the camp both become impure, and require bathing before re-entering the camp, but the High Priest remains pure. In like manner, though Yeshua carried our sins upon Himself in order to make atonement for us, He remained without sin Himself.”

                          So the purpose of the Day of Atonement was to offer the Israelites a very clear picture of Y’shua and what His work on the tree accomplished. I think our confusion of the Day of Atonement comes from modern day Jews, who believe it is their one day to have their sins removed for the sins of the prior year.

                          Blessings,
                          BHS
                          Last edited by BHS; Apr 13th 2008, 02:49 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I would disagree that any of the sins of the people prior to the resurrection of Christ were taken away until the atonement was complete.

                            From the earliest of times Paul explained in Acts that those who placed themselves at His mercy He would in time take away their sin.

                            Acts 17:30-31;
                            "Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now commands all men everywhere to repent, 31 because He has appointed a day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by the Man whom He has ordained. He has given assurance of this to all by raising Him from the dead.”

                            And Abraham believed God and He "credited" him with righteousness to be accomplished in the one atonement.

                            There difficiency of the law and sacrificial system is that they did not keep in the front of their minds that this pointed to a person.

                            Psalm 40
                            6 "Sacrifice and offering You did not desire;
                            My ears You have opened.
                            Burnt offering and sin offering You did not require.
                            7 Then I said, “Behold, I come;
                            In the scroll of the book it is written of me.
                            8 I delight to do Your will, O my God,
                            And Your law is within my heart.”


                            These things are hard to grasp, and I want to add, not say you are all wrong (just to be clear). I see that they were to be obedient to the commands and requirements God placed before them. But I cannot see where any of it actually took away sins.

                            With us we have been saved, we are being saved, and in the end we will be saved, based for us on the surety of a past event, and that we believe what God has said concerning His Son. (1 John 5:9-13)

                            I thank God we have so much revelation, I can only imagine the difficulty in understanding with the complexity of the sacrificial system.
                            Mark


                            “Enter by the narrow gate; for wide is the gate and broad is the way that leads to destruction, and there are many who go in by it. 14 Because narrow is the gate and difficult is the way which leads to life, and there are few who find it." Matthew 7:13-14

                            (All Scripture quoted is from NKJV unless otherwise noted)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jesusinmyheart View Post
                              I once read something about what the name Barabbas means, and that may clarify it some more. I will see if i can find it.
                              "Barabbas" simply means "son [of the] father," from the words "bar" (son) and "abba" (father).
                              To This Day

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