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Do you think the rich young ruler ever sold everything he had?

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  • Do you think the rich young ruler ever sold everything he had?

    Mark 10:17-22

    I think people incorrectly assume he did NOT end up selling everything he had because he went away "grieved"...

    Honestly, the fact he went away grieved makes me think he DID end up selling his possessions, because it shows that he KNEW what the right thing to do was....No way he could be happy with his possessions the rest of his life knowing the truth.

    Here are some things we can infer about the rich young ruler:


    1) First, we can tell me was humble because he kneels in front of Jesus and physically shows that he is submitting himself to Jesus as an authority...As we know God gives grace to the humble, but is opposed to the proud.

    2) Clearly, this was a righteous man that was very careful to glorify God with his life by following the Law...When he tells Jesus he has followed all the law since his youth, it says Jesus "felt a love for him"...I think that infers Jesus could tell that this man really did try to live a Godly life and was seeking after him.

    Yes, he was grieved when he knew he'd have to give up all his possessions for Christ, but since when does grieving mean he'd never give it up?

    For example, there are new believers out there that are grieved when they realize that they have to end a relationship with a boyfriend or girlfriend they love because that person is not a believer or seeking God...Doesn't mean they won't do it.

    If I had to guess, I would say that the Ruler DID end up selling his possessions, and I believe that he is in heaven with Jesus.

  • #2
    If we had to guess, it could go either way... there is no way to be sure....

    I heard a sermon just a few weeks back, and what was a new revelation for me was the commands that Jesus asked him about.

    Luk 18:20 "You know the commandments, 'DO NOT COMMIT ADULTERY, DO NOT MURDER, DO NOT STEAL, DO NOT BEAR FALSE WITNESS, HONOR YOUR FATHER AND MOTHER.'"

    Have you noticed that Jesus asked him about the 5 commandments which relate to man? I'm almost certain he could not have given the same answer if Jesus had asked him about the commandments relating to God.

    Anyway, in the end its just hypothesis...

    Comment


    • #3
      Allot of people kneel before Jesus and think all their relationship is, is to believe. Then when Jesus shows His love for them and requires service and sacrifice then many don't want that and they fall away or they maintain that they believe in Jesus but won't lift a finger to do what His will is for them and they have absolutely no fruit even though they may appear very religious. Hot on the outside for God but cold on the inside for His will in their life. Sad... cause the Love is aways there but obedience is asked for in return so God can fullfill His purpose for/through them... all this takes is sacrifice on our part as we accept God and do it His way (mature and bare fruit) and not our way (struggle/fail and in some cases, fall away).

      I don't assume the rich dude came back to a relationship with Jesus cause it meant sacrifice on his part (give/sell everything) and Jesus gave him a clue as to what would be required of him if he pursued a relationship. He didn't want to be obedient...

      At least this is my opinion.
      Slug1--out

      ~"In the turmoil of any chaos, all it takes is that whisper that is heard like thunder over all the noise and the chaos seems to go away, focus returns and we are comforted in knowing that God has listened to our cry for help."~

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jdu00743 View Post
        Mark 10:17-22

        I think people incorrectly assume he did NOT end up selling everything he had because he went away "grieved"...

        Honestly, the fact he went away grieved makes me think he DID end up selling his possessions, because it shows that he KNEW what the right thing to do was....No way he could be happy with his possessions the rest of his life knowing the truth.

        Here are some things we can infer about the rich young ruler:


        1) First, we can tell me was humble because he kneels in front of Jesus and physically shows that he is submitting himself to Jesus as an authority...As we know God gives grace to the humble, but is opposed to the proud.

        2) Clearly, this was a righteous man that was very careful to glorify God with his life by following the Law...When he tells Jesus he has followed all the law since his youth, it says Jesus "felt a love for him"...I think that infers Jesus could tell that this man really did try to live a Godly life and was seeking after him.

        Yes, he was grieved when he knew he'd have to give up all his possessions for Christ, but since when does grieving mean he'd never give it up?

        For example, there are new believers out there that are grieved when they realize that they have to end a relationship with a boyfriend or girlfriend they love because that person is not a believer or seeking God...Doesn't mean they won't do it.

        If I had to guess, I would say that the Ruler DID end up selling his possessions, and I believe that he is in heaven with Jesus.
        I think the rich young man struck out three times. Think about it, what is the first step in salvation? Acknowledging who Jesus Christ is, the Son of God. When Jesus asked, why callest me good, he was giving the young man the opportunity to acknowledge that Jesus was the Son of God.

        The second was keep the law. In keeping the law that makes you perfect. But we all know nobody can keep the whole law. When he said he kept the law from his youth up, we know that was a lie, nobody can keep the whole law.

        The third, come and follow me. If he had followed Jesus, he would have had the opportunity to acknowledge that he was the Son of God at some later time. Remember the Apostles were not saved when they first followed Jesus, He had to ask them who do you think I am.

        Just an opinion, terrell

        Comment


        • #5
          The rich ruler hung his head. He was convicted. That is the beginning of putting the old man behind and moving forward with the new.

          Did he actually have a change of heart? Scripture doesn't say as far as I know.

          I guess I look back to the first time anyone was called to follow Christ. Peter just got up and went. So did Andrew, Philip and Nathaniel. No questions, just left what they were doing - including their stuff - and followed Him knowing nothing about Him. Heart of a child I'd say, having that sort of faith. To see and believe!

          But later on here comes this young ruler having known something about Jesus and walked away with his head hung when he was told to follow Christ and how. Over stuff.

          The apostles walked away from their physical life source to the spiritual. The rich young ruler prolaiming to have his spiritual life together still clung to the physical.
          Seek ye FIRST the kingdom.
          Not second or third, but first.
          Only when all else pales to God, when He receives all glory,
          when He is the source of all hope,
          when His love is received and freely given,
          holding not to the world but to the promise to come,
          will all other things be added unto to you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tgallison View Post
            I think the rich young man struck out three times. Think about it, what is the first step in salvation? Acknowledging who Jesus Christ is, the Son of God. When Jesus asked, why callest me good, he was giving the young man the opportunity to acknowledge that Jesus was the Son of God.

            The second was keep the law. In keeping the law that makes you perfect. But we all know nobody can keep the whole law. When he said he kept the law from his youth up, we know that was a lie, nobody can keep the whole law.

            The third, come and follow me. If he had followed Jesus, he would have had the opportunity to acknowledge that he was the Son of God at some later time. Remember the Apostles were not saved when they first followed Jesus, He had to ask them who do you think I am.

            Just an opinion, terrell
            one problem with that... where does your interpretation of that line up with the Bible... how many times did you strike out before you 'got it'? That's an unfair interpretation of that and an unfair judgement of the rich young ruler considering how many chances you and I had to accept Christ and missed
            The LORD bless you and keep you; The LORD make His face shine upon you,And be gracious to you; The LORD lift up His countenance upon you,And give you peace.” Numbers 6:24-26

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by timmyb View Post
              one problem with that... where does your interpretation of that line up with the Bible... how many times did you strike out before you 'got it'? That's an unfair interpretation of that and an unfair judgement of the rich young ruler considering how many chances you and I had to accept Christ and missed
              timmyb greetings

              I never meant to imply that he couldn't be saved after that, no where in scripture does it say you only get three strike outs.

              The point is, Jesus asked a question. "Why callest thou me good? none is good, save one, that is, God?

              How would you reply to that? Is Jesus good? or is he not?

              terrell

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by threebigrocks View Post
                The rich ruler hung his head. He was convicted. That is the beginning of putting the old man behind and moving forward with the new.

                Did he actually have a change of heart? Scripture doesn't say as far as I know.

                I guess I look back to the first time anyone was called to follow Christ. Peter just got up and went. So did Andrew, Philip and Nathaniel. No questions, just left what they were doing - including their stuff - and followed Him knowing nothing about Him. Heart of a child I'd say, having that sort of faith. To see and believe!

                But later on here comes this young ruler having known something about Jesus and walked away with his head hung when he was told to follow Christ and how. Over stuff.

                The apostles walked away from their physical life source to the spiritual. The rich young ruler prolaiming to have his spiritual life together still clung to the physical.

                I know MANY, many Christians (including myself) that were grieved with what we would have to give up for God, and did not give it up immediately.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jdu00743 View Post
                  I know MANY, many Christians (including myself) that were grieved with what we would have to give up for God, and did not give it up immediately.
                  It's a progression, a growing up, a maturity that brings us to these realizations. I'm one of them too!
                  Seek ye FIRST the kingdom.
                  Not second or third, but first.
                  Only when all else pales to God, when He receives all glory,
                  when He is the source of all hope,
                  when His love is received and freely given,
                  holding not to the world but to the promise to come,
                  will all other things be added unto to you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jdu00743 View Post
                    Mark 10:17-22

                    I think people incorrectly assume he did NOT end up selling everything he had because he went away "grieved"...

                    Honestly, the fact he went away grieved makes me think he DID end up selling his possessions, because it shows that he KNEW what the right thing to do was....No way he could be happy with his possessions the rest of his life knowing the truth.

                    Here are some things we can infer about the rich young ruler:


                    1) First, we can tell me was humble because he kneels in front of Jesus and physically shows that he is submitting himself to Jesus as an authority...As we know God gives grace to the humble, but is opposed to the proud.

                    2) Clearly, this was a righteous man that was very careful to glorify God with his life by following the Law...When he tells Jesus he has followed all the law since his youth, it says Jesus "felt a love for him"...I think that infers Jesus could tell that this man really did try to live a Godly life and was seeking after him.

                    Yes, he was grieved when he knew he'd have to give up all his possessions for Christ, but since when does grieving mean he'd never give it up?

                    For example, there are new believers out there that are grieved when they realize that they have to end a relationship with a boyfriend or girlfriend they love because that person is not a believer or seeking God...Doesn't mean they won't do it.

                    If I had to guess, I would say that the Ruler DID end up selling his possessions, and I believe that he is in heaven with Jesus.
                    I think the problem for the man is revealed early in the conversation when he asks, Mk 10:17 "Good Master, what shall I do that I may inherit eternal life?" Mt 19:16 "Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life?" All his life the rich ruler is taught that the means of grace is within himself, so he went away disappointed because he thought he could secure salvation through deeds of the flesh without forsaking all to follow Him.

                    Mr 8:34 And when he had called the people unto him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

                    Many Blessings,
                    RW

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Scripture seems to memorialize the faithful for us while the unfaithful are left without identity. The rich young ruler is faceless and nameless to us. While others like Zaccheus and Dora and Lydia and Nicodemus and Cornelius, etc., are commended for their faith and we are given their names. I expect that we will meet them in heaven. Instead the rich young ruler's story seems only to be given to us as an example of what a wrong choice is. Which makes me think twice now that perhaps Simon the Sorcerer did change his ways, while the nameless generic group referred to only as the Pharisees, never did. The rich man in hell vs Lazarus in Abraham's bosom is another such example. The rich young ruler had the wrong response and therefore grief was his experience instead of joy.
                      Robin

                      Truth is so obscure in these times and falsehood so established that, unless one loves the truth, he cannot know it. - Blaise Pascal
                      And Jesus saith unto him [Thomas], I am the way the truth and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me. - John 14:6
                      Discernment is not needed in things that differ, but in things that appear to be the same. - Miles Sanford
                      Those who compromise with Christ’s enemies may be reckoned with them. - C.H. Spurgeon

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can't say what the man did, if he ever sold his stuff even after Christ died and rose again...But I DO know straight from God's word that what is not possible for man IS possible for God...So I think Jesus was saying to his disciples when asked was this man who walked away could be saved by FAITH NOT BY HIS WORKS any works...Maybe after Christ died he became a disciple because GOD KNEW he would send His spirit to him.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And as he was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" And Jesus said to him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone." (Mark 10:17-18)



                          This is the incident we usually refer to as "the story of the rich young ruler," for Luke and Matthew tell us that this young man was very wealthy, and that he was a ruler, an aristocrat.

                          What an amazing picture! This splendid, handsome, attractive young aristocrat, coming and kneeling at the feet of this peasant teacher from Galilee.

                          Notice his opening question: "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" It is obvious from this that the young man had just heard Jesus. He was evidently present when Jesus answered the Pharisees' question on divorce, and he saw Jesus blessing the children and rebuking the disciples, telling them they must become like a child to enter the kingdom of God.

                          Something awakened in this young man's heart as he listened, and as Jesus starts to leave he comes running to him. Kneeling down before him, he says in effect, "All right, how? How do you enter the kingdom?

                          What must I do to inherit eternal life?" You cannot read this without seeing that this young man, whoever he was, possessed at least the first of those qualities Jesus said you must have in order to enter the kingdom.

                          He was direct, forthright; he came immediately to the point. His sense of need was aroused and awakened, and he did not wait; he came right out and asked, "Lord, what must I do?"

                          Notice Jesus' reply: "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone." Many have puzzled over why Jesus said that to this young man.

                          Some of the more liberal commentators have said that this is one clear occasion when Jesus denies that he is God. Their argument goes like this: Jesus says, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God." In asking "Why do you call me good?" he is, in effect, denying that he is good: "Don't call me good; I'm not good. Only God is good, and I'm not God." This is one line of approach you can take with regard to these words.

                          But it is equally valid to take it as a claim to deity on Jesus' part. What he is really saying to this young man is, "Look, why do you call me good? What do you mean by 'good'?

                          If you understand what good means, you will understand that only God is good. Therefore, if you call me good, you must understand that you're calling me God."

                          That is an equally valid interpretation, and certainly is in line with all the rest of the claims of Scripture concerning Jesus and his claims about himself.

                          So it is apparent that he is probing this young man, searching to see if he is willing to investigate and learn -- in other words, to see if he is teachable or not.

                          He has already demonstrated the quality of elementary and uncomplicated directness. He came immediately with the question on his heart -- came running, and knelt down before him -- his heart open and seeking.

                          Now Jesus says "Are you teachable? Are you willing to investigate, to think something through?" Then he tests him on the final quality: "Are you obedient?" Verse 19:

                          "You know the commandments: 'Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud [i.e., covet, or steal], Honor your father and mother.'" (Mark 10:19)

                          "What has God said to you? Have you obeyed? Are you obedient?" This young man's response is beautiful. He says without hesitation,

                          "Teacher, all these I have observed from my youth." (Mark 10:20)

                          Notice that Jesus does not say to him, "Well, you must be keeping something from me. I don't believe that." He does not imply at all that this young man is lying to him, or even deceiving himself, in any way.

                          He seems to accept, to be satisfied with this young man's reply. No wonder Mark goes on to say, "And Jesus looking upon him loved him."

                          Here is an open-hearted, beautiful, moral, excellent young man. Jesus observing him and hearing his answers, loved him -- because he had the qualities which make it possible to enter the kingdom. But he has one thing more to say to him, Verses 21-22:

                          And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, "You lack one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me."

                          At that saying his countenance fell, and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions. (Mark 10:21-22 )

                          Jesus is saying, "You have the qualities it takes to enter the kingdom. You are simple and direct, you are teachable, and you are obedient. That is, you have been.

                          Now let's see how much you have retained of those qualities How obedient are you now? How far do you carry this willingness to act upon what you know to be true?

                          You lack but one thing: go and sell all that you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come and follow me."

                          There is an ironic humor in the young man's response: "He went away sorrowful, for he had great possessions."

                          Would you go away sorrowful if you had great possessions? If you had just won fifty thousand dollars in a television give-away program, would you go away sorrowful?

                          No, you would be rejoicing. But this young man went away sorrowful, because he had great possessions. Why?

                          Of course the answer is that he could see there was no way he could serve two masters. Jesus in that marvelous way of his, had pierced right to the heart of this young man's life, right to the deep things of his spirit, and had shown him that he was owned by another god.

                          This young man, who had everything that money and power and youth could give him, nevertheless had wanted something far more important. He saw it, caught a glimpse of it, wanted it -- eternal life not just living forever, but a quality of life he knew he lacked, an emptiness within his spirit he could not fill.

                          But he knew this could fill it, and he wanted it. But he was sorrowful, because he also knew, at the words of Jesus, that he had to give up the other in order to have this; he could not have both.

                          This is why he went away sorrowful -- because he had great possessions.

                          I do not believe this is the end of the story. I believe, from various indications in Scripture, that this young man was Mark himself.

                          It is only Mark who tells us that when Jesus looked at this young man, he loved him.

                          How could Mark know that, if Jesus had not told him? And Mark was indeed a rich young man, a member of the aristocratic ruling class in Israel.

                          He fits this picture in many ways. And only Mark tells us of the young man who flees from the scene of the arrest of Jesus, leaving his garment in the hands of the soldiers, and runs off naked into the night.

                          If this was indeed Mark, then there must have come a time when this young man, weighing what Jesus had said, understanding that he was putting all his present comfort and material wealth in the balance against eternal life, against the importance and value of his soul both now and in eternity, understanding that he was giving up the satisfaction of all the deep things of his manhood in exchange for these paltry riches, decided to put it all away and obey Jesus.

                          He gave everything away, and had nothing left but a robe, and came and followed Jesus. And that is why he writes this Gospel.

                          Now, this is my own speculation. It is not what the Scripture teaches. You may not agree, and that is fine.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lars777 View Post
                            And as he was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" And Jesus said to him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone." (Mark 10:17-18)



                            This is the incident we usually refer to as "the story of the rich young ruler," for Luke and Matthew tell us that this young man was very wealthy, and that he was a ruler, an aristocrat.

                            What an amazing picture! This splendid, handsome, attractive young aristocrat, coming and kneeling at the feet of this peasant teacher from Galilee.

                            Notice his opening question: "Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" It is obvious from this that the young man had just heard Jesus. He was evidently present when Jesus answered the Pharisees' question on divorce, and he saw Jesus blessing the children and rebuking the disciples, telling them they must become like a child to enter the kingdom of God.

                            Something awakened in this young man's heart as he listened, and as Jesus starts to leave he comes running to him. Kneeling down before him, he says in effect, "All right, how? How do you enter the kingdom?

                            What must I do to inherit eternal life?" You cannot read this without seeing that this young man, whoever he was, possessed at least the first of those qualities Jesus said you must have in order to enter the kingdom.

                            He was direct, forthright; he came immediately to the point. His sense of need was aroused and awakened, and he did not wait; he came right out and asked, "Lord, what must I do?"

                            Notice Jesus' reply: "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone." Many have puzzled over why Jesus said that to this young man.

                            Some of the more liberal commentators have said that this is one clear occasion when Jesus denies that he is God. Their argument goes like this: Jesus says, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God." In asking "Why do you call me good?" he is, in effect, denying that he is good: "Don't call me good; I'm not good. Only God is good, and I'm not God." This is one line of approach you can take with regard to these words.

                            But it is equally valid to take it as a claim to deity on Jesus' part. What he is really saying to this young man is, "Look, why do you call me good? What do you mean by 'good'?

                            If you understand what good means, you will understand that only God is good. Therefore, if you call me good, you must understand that you're calling me God."

                            That is an equally valid interpretation, and certainly is in line with all the rest of the claims of Scripture concerning Jesus and his claims about himself.

                            So it is apparent that he is probing this young man, searching to see if he is willing to investigate and learn -- in other words, to see if he is teachable or not.

                            He has already demonstrated the quality of elementary and uncomplicated directness. He came immediately with the question on his heart -- came running, and knelt down before him -- his heart open and seeking.

                            Now Jesus says "Are you teachable? Are you willing to investigate, to think something through?" Then he tests him on the final quality: "Are you obedient?" Verse 19:

                            "You know the commandments: 'Do not kill, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud [i.e., covet, or steal], Honor your father and mother.'" (Mark 10:19)

                            "What has God said to you? Have you obeyed? Are you obedient?" This young man's response is beautiful. He says without hesitation,

                            "Teacher, all these I have observed from my youth." (Mark 10:20)

                            Notice that Jesus does not say to him, "Well, you must be keeping something from me. I don't believe that." He does not imply at all that this young man is lying to him, or even deceiving himself, in any way.

                            He seems to accept, to be satisfied with this young man's reply. No wonder Mark goes on to say, "And Jesus looking upon him loved him."

                            Here is an open-hearted, beautiful, moral, excellent young man. Jesus observing him and hearing his answers, loved him -- because he had the qualities which make it possible to enter the kingdom. But he has one thing more to say to him, Verses 21-22:

                            And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, "You lack one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me."

                            At that saying his countenance fell, and he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions. (Mark 10:21-22 )

                            Jesus is saying, "You have the qualities it takes to enter the kingdom. You are simple and direct, you are teachable, and you are obedient. That is, you have been.

                            Now let's see how much you have retained of those qualities How obedient are you now? How far do you carry this willingness to act upon what you know to be true?

                            You lack but one thing: go and sell all that you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come and follow me."

                            There is an ironic humor in the young man's response: "He went away sorrowful, for he had great possessions."

                            Would you go away sorrowful if you had great possessions? If you had just won fifty thousand dollars in a television give-away program, would you go away sorrowful?

                            No, you would be rejoicing. But this young man went away sorrowful, because he had great possessions. Why?

                            Of course the answer is that he could see there was no way he could serve two masters. Jesus in that marvelous way of his, had pierced right to the heart of this young man's life, right to the deep things of his spirit, and had shown him that he was owned by another god.

                            This young man, who had everything that money and power and youth could give him, nevertheless had wanted something far more important. He saw it, caught a glimpse of it, wanted it -- eternal life not just living forever, but a quality of life he knew he lacked, an emptiness within his spirit he could not fill.

                            But he knew this could fill it, and he wanted it. But he was sorrowful, because he also knew, at the words of Jesus, that he had to give up the other in order to have this; he could not have both.

                            This is why he went away sorrowful -- because he had great possessions.

                            I do not believe this is the end of the story. I believe, from various indications in Scripture, that this young man was Mark himself.

                            It is only Mark who tells us that when Jesus looked at this young man, he loved him.

                            How could Mark know that, if Jesus had not told him? And Mark was indeed a rich young man, a member of the aristocratic ruling class in Israel.

                            He fits this picture in many ways. And only Mark tells us of the young man who flees from the scene of the arrest of Jesus, leaving his garment in the hands of the soldiers, and runs off naked into the night.

                            If this was indeed Mark, then there must have come a time when this young man, weighing what Jesus had said, understanding that he was putting all his present comfort and material wealth in the balance against eternal life, against the importance and value of his soul both now and in eternity, understanding that he was giving up the satisfaction of all the deep things of his manhood in exchange for these paltry riches, decided to put it all away and obey Jesus.

                            He gave everything away, and had nothing left but a robe, and came and followed Jesus. And that is why he writes this Gospel.

                            Now, this is my own speculation. It is not what the Scripture teaches. You may not agree, and that is fine.
                            That is a very interesting take...And I hope it is true!

                            It is obviously a bit of a stretch, but it would mean this "Rich young ruler" really is with Jesus in heaven.

                            Random Question: How do you know Mark was a member of the upper class? Wasn't he a disciple of Peter? (two mutually exclusive questions)

                            On a side note: If it truly was Mark, I kinda doubt he would remain nameless in the gospels this story is mentioned...Particularly in Mark.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lars777 View Post

                              Some of the more liberal commentators have said that this is one clear occasion when Jesus denies that he is God. Their argument goes like this: Jesus says, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God." In asking "Why do you call me good?" he is, in effect, denying that he is good: "Don't call me good; I'm not good. Only God is good, and I'm not God." This is one line of approach you can take with regard to these words.

                              But it is equally valid to take it as a claim to deity on Jesus' part. What he is really saying to this young man is, "Look, why do you call me good? What do you mean by 'good'?

                              If you understand what good means, you will understand that only God is good. Therefore, if you call me good, you must understand that you're calling me God."

                              That is an equally valid interpretation, and certainly is in line with all the rest of the claims of Scripture concerning Jesus and his claims about himself.
                              I wonder if this rich young ruler didn't have the same thinking at that moment as Nicodemus had when he first approached Jesus.

                              John 3
                              3Jesus answered and said to him, "Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God."

                              4Nicodemus said to Him, "How can a man be born when he is old? He cannot enter a second time into his mother's womb and be born, can he?"
                              5Jesus answered, "Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.
                              6"That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.
                              7"Do not be amazed that I said to you, 'You must be born again.'
                              8"The wind blows where it wishes and you hear the sound of it, but do not know where it comes from and where it is going; so is everyone who is born of the Spirit."
                              9Nicodemus said to Him, "How can these things be?"
                              10Jesus answered and said to him, "Are you the teacher of Israel and do not understand these things?
                              11"Truly, truly, I say to you, we speak of what we know and testify of what we have seen, and you do not accept our testimony. 12"If I told you earthly things and you do not believe, how will you believe if I tell you heavenly things?
                              Jesus said that he who has seen Him has seen the Father, so he is not denying his place in the Godhead at all. Yet, Father, Son and Spirit make up the completeness of God together. I see it as the young ruler hearing and seeing something incredible for sure, but only taking it into his mind and not his heart. He too needed to be reborn and not of water but by the Spirit. The desire, and counting those costs, of putting aside worldly things which pass away was great for that young man.

                              If we read in John in Chapter 7 when Jesus went on after the disciples to the Feast of Booths and taught in the temple, many of his followers fell away when they heard him speak because of the desire of the pharasees and sadducees to arrest him. Jesus wasn't so nice and inspirational when they began to see and count the costs of following Him.
                              Seek ye FIRST the kingdom.
                              Not second or third, but first.
                              Only when all else pales to God, when He receives all glory,
                              when He is the source of all hope,
                              when His love is received and freely given,
                              holding not to the world but to the promise to come,
                              will all other things be added unto to you.

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