Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why do we remember Christ's death?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why do we remember Christ's death?

    "For the love of Christ controls us, having concluded this, that one died for all, therefore all died; and He died for all, so that they who live might no longer live for themselves, but for Him who died and rose again on their behalf."—2 Corinthians 5:14-15.

    We're all pretty familiar with the idea of the role that faith in Christ's resurrection plays in our salvation and regeneration. But why did He institute communion and tell us to remember his death? When we look upon the cross in faith we're looking at ourselves (our old self) on that cross. When He died, everyone's old sin nature died with Him. We must look upon the cross in faith and remember that we died there as well. He has set us free; all we have to do is believe and accept it.

    See also Romans 6:5:

    "For if we have been united with Him like this in His death, we will certainly also be united with Him in His resurrection. We know that our old self was crucified with Him so that the body of sin might be rendered powerless, that we should no longer be slaves to sin. For anyone who has died has been freed from sin."
    Love is patient, love is kind. . .

  • #2
    We need to remember Christ's death because it is a constant reminder to us to put to death our own independent ways. Everything we do must be done in partnership with the Lord. After all, life is to know him.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by randyk View Post
      We need to remember Christ's death because it is a constant reminder to us to put to death our own independent ways. Everything we do must be done in partnership with the Lord. After all, life is to know him.
      Christ already did it for us. Everything we do must be done by faith in Him.
      Love is patient, love is kind. . .

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by pdun459 View Post

        Christ already did it for us. Everything we do must be done by faith in Him.
        I'm not sure if you're agreeing, disagreeing, or what? On the face of it, yes--Christ did, in the past, what we needed for our redemption. And he continues to work in us today, by virtue of what he did for us so long ago. That is the "partnership" I'm speaking of. It's not us doing works in honor of what he did, but rather, working together with him to produce his righteousness in us. Our work is actually obedience to his Spirit, so that what we choose to do is permeated by his goodness.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's not really a 'partnership.' It's Christ working through us by faith to do that which we are unable to do for ourselves; all we can do is believe and submit. If it's a partnership at all, that's our role I guess.

          Galatians 2:8—"For the One who was at work in Peter’s apostleship to the circumcised was also at work in my apostleship to the Gentiles."

          Galatians 2:20—"I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God."

          Ephesians 2:8-10—"For it is by grace you have been saved through faith, and this not from yourselves; it is the gift of God, not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance as our way of life."

          Philippians 2:13—"For it is God who works in you to will and to act on behalf of His good purpose."

          1 Thessalonians 2:13—"And we continually thank God because, when you received the word of God that you heard from us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but as the true word of God—the word which is now at work in you who believe."

          Hebrews 13:20-21—"Now may the God of peace, who through the blood of the eternal covenant brought back from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great Shepherd of the sheep, equip you with every good thing to do His will. And may He accomplish in us what is pleasing in His sight through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen."

          There are more, but you get the idea.

          Why did Paul refer to himself so often as a slave or servant of Christ Jesus and not partner?
          Love is patient, love is kind. . .

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by pdun459 View Post
            "For the love of Christ controls us, having concluded this, that one died for all, therefore all died; and He died for all, so that they who live might no longer live for themselves, but for Him who died and rose again on their behalf."—2 Corinthians 5:14-15.

            We're all pretty familiar with the idea of the role that faith in Christ's resurrection plays in our salvation and regeneration. But why did He institute communion and tell us to remember his death? When we look upon the cross in faith we're looking at ourselves (our old self) on that cross. When He died, everyone's old sin nature died with Him. We must look upon the cross in faith and remember that we died there as well. He has set us free; all we have to do is believe and accept it.

            See also Romans 6:5:

            "For if we have been united with Him like this in His death, we will certainly also be united with Him in His resurrection. We know that our old self was crucified with Him so that the body of sin might be rendered powerless, that we should no longer be slaves to sin. For anyone who has died has been freed from sin."
            I understand that we are commanded to remember Christ's death because it is the most monumental event in the history of not only time, but eternity. Because we live in the age of grace, and are expected to suffer injustice without claiming our rights, Christians forget, or or not taught, what it took for justice and mercy to kiss (Ps.85:10). The intrinsic nature of God is righteousness. This is reflected in the Law of Moses. There is to be NO PITY in the execution of retribution (Deut.13:8, 19:13, 21, 23:12, etc). God's righteous nature is much higher than His quest for mercy. He will execute judgement long before He entertains mercy. Justice and Mercy are, for all intents and purposes MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE. They cannot exist together normally.

            If man causes damage to another man, whether accidental or intended, the SAME damage must be administered to the first man. If the judge of this matter abides by God's Law of an Eye for an eye, He CANNOT administer mercy. It would be UNJUST to the damaged party. Likewise, if the judge winks at the evil (or damage) done, and lets the second party go free, he has administered mercy but was UNJUST. The death of our Lord Jesus is an amazing bit of judicial maneuvering. It needed a just God Who was about to carry out His retribution. It needed a Man, for in justice, only a man can die for a man. It needed an innocent man for if he had one little sin the substitute can only die for himself. And above all, it needed a VOLUNTEER, because if the innocent substitute was commanded, or forced to be a substitute, it would be unjust.

            The end of the matter is that Jesus Christ, born of the Holy Spirit, which broke the line to Adam's nature, but born of a woman, to establish His humanity and make Him a Man, knowing His Father's will to save lost men, went to the most horrendous end VOLUNTARILY to please His Father. This act will NEVER BE FORGOTTEN BY THE FATHER! Jesus Christ did not only fulfill the Law in every point, but He went far over and above the Law to fulfill His Father's goal. His Work on Golgotha is without precedent, and established by the Almighty God of the universe as a Monument in both time and in eternity.

            Even in New Jerusalem, in the "ages to come", when all matters of government have been settled, when sin is set aside (for there can be no sin without death), when the Tree of Life is reinstated and no blood is called into effect, JESUS CHRIST STILL RETAINS THE TITLE OF "LAMB" mentioned FIVE TIMES in Revelation 21 and 22. We Christians have the PRIVILEGE of commemorating this death IN THIS AGE when all others reject, hate and despise Jesus - Darling of Heaven. The Breaking of Bread and the Cup, unlike the Passover, WILL END when Jesus returns (1st Cor.11:26).

            How often does your Assembly do it? The primitive Church did it DAILY (Act.2:46)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Walls View Post

              I understand that we are commanded to remember Christ's death because it is the most monumental event in the history of not only time, but eternity. Because we live in the age of grace, and are expected to suffer injustice without claiming our rights, Christians forget, or or not taught, what it took for justice and mercy to kiss (Ps.85:10). The intrinsic nature of God is righteousness. This is reflected in the Law of Moses. There is to be NO PITY in the execution of retribution (Deut.13:8, 19:13, 21, 23:12, etc). God's righteous nature is much higher than His quest for mercy. He will execute judgement long before He entertains mercy. Justice and Mercy are, for all intents and purposes MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE. They cannot exist together normally.

              If man causes damage to another man, whether accidental or intended, the SAME damage must be administered to the first man. If the judge of this matter abides by God's Law of an Eye for an eye, He CANNOT administer mercy. It would be UNJUST to the damaged party. Likewise, if the judge winks at the evil (or damage) done, and lets the second party go free, he has administered mercy but was UNJUST. The death of our Lord Jesus is an amazing bit of judicial maneuvering. It needed a just God Who was about to carry out His retribution. It needed a Man, for in justice, only a man can die for a man. It needed an innocent man for if he had one little sin the substitute can only die for himself. And above all, it needed a VOLUNTEER, because if the innocent substitute was commanded, or forced to be a substitute, it would be unjust.

              The end of the matter is that Jesus Christ, born of the Holy Spirit, which broke the line to Adam's nature, but born of a woman, to establish His humanity and make Him a Man, knowing His Father's will to save lost men, went to the most horrendous end VOLUNTARILY to please His Father. This act will NEVER BE FORGOTTEN BY THE FATHER! Jesus Christ did not only fulfill the Law in every point, but He went far over and above the Law to fulfill His Father's goal. His Work on Golgotha is without precedent, and established by the Almighty God of the universe as a Monument in both time and in eternity.

              Even in New Jerusalem, in the "ages to come", when all matters of government have been settled, when sin is set aside (for there can be no sin without death), when the Tree of Life is reinstated and no blood is called into effect, JESUS CHRIST STILL RETAINS THE TITLE OF "LAMB" mentioned FIVE TIMES in Revelation 21 and 22. We Christians have the PRIVILEGE of commemorating this death IN THIS AGE when all others reject, hate and despise Jesus - Darling of Heaven. The Breaking of Bread and the Cup, unlike the Passover, WILL END when Jesus returns (1st Cor.11:26).

              How often does your Assembly do it? The primitive Church did it DAILY (Act.2:46)
              You didn't mention the fact that as believers we have been crucified with Him. Isn't that a good reason to remember?
              Love is patient, love is kind. . .

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by pdun459 View Post

                You didn't mention the fact that as believers we have been crucified with Him. Isn't that a good reason to remember?
                Yes. I consciously left it out because our Lord said "this do in remembrance of ME" (1st Cor.11:24-25). But in a hidden way, you have a point. When we break the bread, the whole loaf speaks of the Church, and the individual pieces speak for the individual FOR WHOM Christ's Body was broken.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pdun459 View Post
                  "For the love of Christ controls us, having concluded this, that one died for all, therefore all died; and He died for all, so that they who live might no longer live for themselves, but for Him who died and rose again on their behalf."—2 Corinthians 5:14-15.

                  We're all pretty familiar with the idea of the role that faith in Christ's resurrection plays in our salvation and regeneration. But why did He institute communion and tell us to remember his death? When we look upon the cross in faith we're looking at ourselves (our old self) on that cross. When He died, everyone's old sin nature died with Him. We must look upon the cross in faith and remember that we died there as well. He has set us free; all we have to do is believe and accept it.

                  See also Romans 6:5:

                  "For if we have been united with Him like this in His death, we will certainly also be united with Him in His resurrection. We know that our old self was crucified with Him so that the body of sin might be rendered powerless, that we should no longer be slaves to sin. For anyone who has died has been freed from sin."
                  Our faith is in the "work" of the crucified Christ, i.e. Jesus Christ as our "Savior". Walls referred to it as "His work on Golgatha". Here is a detour, so I hope you stay with me. In water baptism discussions, there are two predominate views. One view is that our Baptism is a symbolic "work" (very much like Communion is symbolic, these are my views). Others believe that our Baptism is not only symbolic, but that it is also an efficacious "work". The latter means that Baptism is the "how" God saves us and without it, we are not saved. We have the same views in Communion, where some view Communion as symbolic, and others as an efficacious ritual where the actual flesh and blood of Jesus is consumed to bring to us life.

                  Now, what is TRULY efficacious is Christ's work on the cross. We refer to Jesus' death as the necessary vicarious sacrifice of the human - God (Jesus Christ) to reconcile humanity back to God. Thus, no death, no salvation of humanity. Christ's death on the cross was not to get to the resurrected Christ, but rather His death was the work performed that was necessary and efficient for our Salvation. Jesus' resurrection is proof of God's acceptance of Jesus' work on the cross. Now many believe that Jesus Christ's death was so efficient that it saves all in the end whether they place their faith in Him and His work on the cross in this life or not. (I do not believe that, but it is worth mentioning to show the idea of efficacy).

                  What work then was concluded on the cross by Jesus? We refer to it as "atonement". Atonement in the Bible is not simply an interpreted word in our English translations. Rather, atonement in English is a made up word because there wasn't already a word that embodied the idea. Atonement is at-one-ment, thus our reconciliation to God.

                  Here is one passage where all of this is made clear(er):

                  Romans 5:6-11 For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him. For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life. And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

                  Here is an explanation from Scripture on why this was the plan.

                  Hebrews 2:9-18 But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.

                  For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren, Saying, I will declare thy name unto my brethren, in the midst of the church will I sing praise unto thee. And again, I will put my trust in him. And again, Behold I and the children which God hath given me.

                  Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage. For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted.


                  Communion:

                  1 Corinthians 11:23-26 For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me. For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
                  Watchinginawe

                  I Samuel 3:10 And the LORD came, and stood, and called as at other times, Samuel, Samuel. Then Samuel answered, Speak; for thy servant heareth.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X