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Remembering the Sabbath

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  • Remembering the Sabbath

    Thought I'd share a few thoughts on the Saturday Sabbath.

    In Jesus' day, the Pharisees were all caught up in rules and traditions about what was and what wasn't considered work. They were so obsessed with their rules they overlooked the whole reason the Lord had commanded them to rest—i.e., to stop and worship Him. Look at Isaiah 58: 13-14:

    "If you turn away your foot from the Sabbath, From doing your pleasure on My holy day, And call the Sabbath a delight, The holy day of the Lord honorable, And shall honor Him, not doing your own ways, Nor finding your own pleasure, Nor speaking your own words, Then you shall delight yourself in the Lord; And I will cause you to ride on the high hills of the earth, And feed you with the heritage of Jacob your father. The mouth of the Lord has spoken."

    The whole idea was to stop what we're doing and spend one day wholly thinking about Him.

    It seems to me today we've fallen into the same trap as the Pharisees. When you mention the Sabbath, the first thought that comes to mind is rest, or not working. But it's important to remember why God rested in the first place.

    The Sabbath was established back in Genesis when God rested from His work of creation. The Sabbath reminds us that God is our creator; and not just us but all of creation. Consider Romans 1:20:

    "For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse."

    God's creation is one of the primary ways by which we know there is a God. He wants us to remember that it was He who created it all.

    The first four commandments refer to ways we honor God. Somehow it doesn't seem right to me to say the fourth commandment is no longer in effect; or that it only applies to the Jewish race.

    Not trying to convert anyone, just something to think about.
    Love is patient, love is kind; it does not envy, it does not boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.

  • #2
    Originally posted by pdun459 View Post
    Thought I'd share a few thoughts on the Saturday Sabbath.

    In Jesus' day, the Pharisees were all caught up in rules and traditions about what was and what wasn't considered work. They were so obsessed with their rules they overlooked the whole reason the Lord had commanded them to rest—i.e., to stop and worship Him. Look at Isaiah 58: 13-14:

    "If you turn away your foot from the Sabbath, From doing your pleasure on My holy day, And call the Sabbath a delight, The holy day of the Lord honorable, And shall honor Him, not doing your own ways, Nor finding your own pleasure, Nor speaking your own words, Then you shall delight yourself in the Lord; And I will cause you to ride on the high hills of the earth, And feed you with the heritage of Jacob your father. The mouth of the Lord has spoken."

    The whole idea was to stop what we're doing and spend one day wholly thinking about Him.

    It seems to me today we've fallen into the same trap as the Pharisees. When you mention the Sabbath, the first thought that comes to mind is rest, or not working. But it's important to remember why God rested in the first place.

    The Sabbath was established back in Genesis when God rested from His work of creation. The Sabbath reminds us that God is our creator; and not just us but all of creation. Consider Romans 1:20:

    "For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse."

    God's creation is one of the primary ways by which we know there is a God. He wants us to remember that it was He who created it all.

    The first four commandments refer to ways we honor God. Somehow it doesn't seem right to me to say the fourth commandment is no longer in effect; or that it only applies to the Jewish race.

    Not trying to convert anyone, just something to think about.
    Excellent points. It is right and good to think of God, and concentrate on God, and to take a rest from working to focus our mind, heart, soul, and strength on God.

    The problem comes when you make that good thing a command. None of the "10 Commandments" are binding today. They are all good things to do, but all of them were part of the Law of Moses. And the Law was nailed to the Cross when it was finished, completed, made perfect, accomplished by Jesus the Christ. Part of the Law was that we are to worship in Jerusalem, and make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem at least 3 times a year to make sacrifice, and attend the Holy Convocations at the prescribed times. I don't hear anyone claiming that we must continue to do that. Another command was to make animal sacrifice, and grain sacrifice, and wine, and oil, etc. weekly, monthly and annually. I don't hear anyone claiming that we must continue to do that either. In fact, the only place where it is permissible to do that (under the Law) was destroyed in 70AD.

    If we must keep one part of the Law, we must keep the whole Law. I know, someone will say, and you alluded to it, that the Sabbath predates the Law and goes all the way back to Creation. This is true. But the NT wipes out all of the old commandments, because everything that came before was a foreshadowing of the perfect. Col 2:16-23 is pretty clear that observances like the Sabbath are of no value under the NT because they "are of no value against the indulgence of the flesh."

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    • #3
      Hi Doug, thanks for you comments.

      One big misunderstanding a lot of people have is not realizing that God's law (the Ten Commandments) and the ceremonial law (the Law of Moses) are two related, but entirely different, things.

      The Ten Commandments bring an awareness of sin—because no one except Christ has ever kept them perfectly. The Ten Commandments bring an awareness of the problem; the ceremonial law was God's prescription (however imperfect) under the old covenant.

      The Ten Commandments are still in effect under the new covenant; still, no one can keep them perfectly. However, we now have Christ (who did keep them perfectly) as our redeemer and the Holy Spirit to help us. God still wants us to obey His commandments but we can't do it by works but by faith in Christ. If we fail (as we surely will), we now have an Advocate who will mediate with God on our behalf. We've been released from the letter of the law to serve in the newness of the Spirit. It's simply two different ways of achieving the same goal.

      "But now we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive, so that we serve in the new way of the Spirit and not in the old way of the written code."—Romans 7:6.

      'This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, declares the Lord: I will put my laws on their hearts, and write them on their minds."—Hebrews 10:6.

      The Ten Commandments weren't nail to the cross but the ceremonial law which stood against us as a testimony to our sin.

      I can back all of this up with scripture as I've done many times here before. But it's all documented in books and on the internet if you're interested in looking further into it.
      Love is patient, love is kind; it does not envy, it does not boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.

      Comment


      • #4
        We, too, have believed in Christ Jesus that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by the works of the law; Gal 2:16
        Originally posted by pdun459 View Post
        Hi Doug, thanks for you comments.

        One big misunderstanding a lot of people have is not realizing that God's law (the Ten Commandments) and the ceremonial law (the Law of Moses) are two related, but entirely different, things.
        Why should anyone confuse a righteousness of their own which is from the law, from that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith; (Philippians 3:9)

        Comment

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