Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is Luke Telling Us?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What is Luke Telling Us?

    What I am about to present to you is something that you most likely have never noticed before.

    Has anyone noticed that the gospel of Luke paints a picture of a much closer relationship between the Lord and His disciples than the other two synoptic gospels do?

    Here are some examples. Pay special attention to the underlined parts of these scriptures for a revealing truth. I will post the same account from each gospel:

    Matthew 4
    18As Jesus was walking beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon called Peter and his brother Andrew. They were casting a net into the lake, for they were fishermen. 19"Come, follow me," Jesus said, "and I will make you fishers of men." 20At once they left their nets and followed him.
    21Going on from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John. They were in a boat with their father Zebedee, preparing their nets. Jesus called them, 22and immediately they left the boat and their father and followed him



    Mark 1
    16As Jesus walked beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the lake, for they were fishermen. 17"Come, follow me," Jesus said, "and I will make you fishers of men." 18At once they left their nets and followed him.

    19When he had gone a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John in a boat, preparing their nets. 20Without delay he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men and followed him.


    Luke 5
    8When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at Jesus' knees and said, "Go away from me, Lord; I am a sinful man!" 9For he and all his companions were astonished at the catch of fish they had taken, 10and so were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, Simon's partners. Then Jesus said to Simon, "Don't be afraid; from now on you will catch men." 11So they pulled their boats up on shore, left everything and followed him.


    With all of the similarities, only Luke tells us the disciples "left everything" to follow the Lord. The other two gospels simply tell us they left specific things left behind.

    This type of theme is clear and consistent all throughout the book of Luke. I will post just a few more examples, but there are many that could be shown.


    Matthew 9
    9As Jesus went on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the tax collector's booth. "Follow me," he told him, and Matthew got up and followed him.


    Mark 2
    14As he walked along, he saw Levi son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax collector's booth. "Follow me," Jesus told him, and Levi got up and followed him.


    Luke 5
    27After this, Jesus went out and saw a tax collector by the name of Levi sitting at his tax booth. "Follow me," Jesus said to him, 28and Levi got up, left everything and followed him.

    In this case, Matthew and Mark don't mention Matthew leaving anything behind. However, Luke, again, mentions leaving everything.

    Let's look at an interesting difference pertaining to what happened just after the transfiguration:

    Matthew 17
    9As they were coming down the mountain, Jesus instructed them, "Don't tell anyone what you have seen, until the Son of Man has been raised from the dead."

    Mark 9
    9As they were coming down the mountain, Jesus gave them orders not to tell anyone what they had seen until the Son of Man had risen from the dead.

    Luke 9
    37The next day, when they came down from the mountain, a large crowd met him.

    Luke has two differences that we notice here, but the primary one I want to focus on for now is the fact that Luke specifies to us that the Lord spent an extra night on that mountain with His disciples. The other two gospels give no indication that they spent the night together on the mountain.

    Another example consistent with this theme:

    Matthew 26
    28This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.

    Mark 14
    24"This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many," he said to them.

    Luke 22
    20In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you.


    In Matthew and Mark, His blood is poured out for many. In Luke, His blood is poured out for the disciples.




    Another interesting observation. After the Passover meal (and just before the crucifixion process was about to begin), we see the Lord telling His disciples in Matthew and Mark that they will all fall away.


    Matthew 26
    30When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.
    31Then Jesus told them, "This very night you will all fall away on account of me, for it is written: " 'I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock will be scattered.' 32But after I have risen, I will go ahead of you into Galilee."

    Mark 14
    26When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.
    27"You will all fall away," Jesus told them, "for it is written: " 'I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered.' 28But after I have risen, I will go ahead of you into Galilee."



    You can go ahead and read the Luke account in your bible, and you will see that He does not tell them that they will fall away.

    Going further, we see:

    Matthew 26
    55At that time Jesus said to the crowd, "Am I leading a rebellion, that you have come out with swords and clubs to capture me? Every day I sat in the temple courts teaching, and you did not arrest me. 56But this has all taken place that the writings of the prophets might be fulfilled." Then all the disciples deserted him and fled.


    Mark 14
    48"Am I leading a rebellion," said Jesus, "that you have come out with swords and clubs to capture me? 49Every day I was with you, teaching in the temple courts, and you did not arrest me. But the Scriptures must be fulfilled." 50Then everyone deserted him and fled.

    By now, it should come as no surprise to anyone reading this that Luke does not mention the disciples deserting Him.

    Luke 22
    52Then Jesus said to the chief priests, the officers of the temple guard, and the elders, who had come for him, "Am I leading a rebellion, that you have come with swords and clubs? 53Every day I was with you in the temple courts, and you did not lay a hand on me. But this is your hour—when darkness reigns."

    Nowhere in the Luke account of the Lord being arrested is it mentioned that the disciples deserted Him.

    Here is another interesting difference to take into account. This pertains to the time in which the disciples realized that the Lord had risen.

    Matthew 28
    19Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age."

    Mark 16
    15He said to them, "Go into all the world and preach the good news to all creation.

    Luke 24
    49I am going to send you what my Father has promised; but stay in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high."

    In Matthew and Mark, He instructs them to "go," but in Luke, He instructs them to "stay." Also, only Luke mentions the disciples receiving what the Father promised, and only Luke mentions the disciples being clothed with power from on high.

    One more thing I would like to mention (although, there are so many - maybe dozens more - similar differences that I could point out.):

    Only in Luke do we see it mentioned that:

    Luke 24
    45Then he opened their minds so they could understand the Scriptures.

    This statement is found nowhere in Matthew or Mark.

    So, the question is, why do we see Luke's recollection of these events differing from the other two gospels in such a way that it paints a far closer relationship between the Lord and His disciples than do the other two gospels?

    Why, in Luke ONLY:

    -do the disciples "leave everything?"

    -did He spend an extra night with the disciples on the mount of transfiguration?

    -did He tell the disciples His blood was to be poured out for them, as opposed to "many?"

    -did He NOT tell the disciples that they would desert Him?

    -is it not mentioned that the disciples deserted Him?

    -did He tell the disciples that they were to stay in the city until clothed with power from on high?

    -is it mentioned that He opened their minds to understand the scriptures?

    If anyone is interested in more of these differences, I will be happy to list more. I assure you, there are many more differences such as this, and they all fit the theme that we have seen here.

    So, what is Luke trying to tell us here?















  • #2
    I'd simply say that in those cases (and as a general rule, apparently) Luke is more interested in stressing issues of discipleship and relationship to Christ. Do you think there is a more complicated explanation for these observations?
    The Matthew Never Knew
    The Knew Kingdom

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by matthew94 View Post
      I'd simply say that in those cases (and as a general rule, apparently) Luke is more interested in stressing issues of discipleship and relationship to Christ. Do you think there is a more complicated explanation for these observations?
      I don't know that I'd say "complicated." I would say there is a more "in depth" and "revealing" explanation for those observations.

      Let me show you another example of a way in which Luke differs:

      Matthew 24

      32"Now learn this lesson from the fig tree: As soon as its twigs get tender and its leaves come out, you know that summer is near. 33Even so, when you see all these things, you know that it is near, right at the door. 34I tell you the truth, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened. 35Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.

      36"No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.


      Mark 13
      28"Now learn this lesson from the fig tree: As soon as its twigs get tender and its leaves come out, you know that summer is near. 29Even so, when you see these things happening, you know that it is near, right at the door. 30I tell you the truth, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened. 31Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.

      32"No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.

      Both Matthew and Mark show the Lord talking about how the time drawing near will be like a fig tree blooming, and then He talks about His words never passing away. In those two gospels, He talks about no one knowing the day or hour of His return, not even Himself.

      Luke 21
      29He told them this parable: "Look at the fig tree and all the trees. 30When they sprout leaves, you can see for yourselves and know that summer is near. 31Even so, when you see these things happening, you know that the kingdom of God is near.

      32"I tell you the truth, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened. 33Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.


      Here in Luke, we can see the same things. But, instead of Him going on to say that no one knows the day or hour of His return, we see a different message:


      34"Be careful, or your hearts will be weighed down with dissipation, drunkenness and the anxieties of life, and that day will close on you unexpectedly like a trap. 35For it will come upon all those who live on the face of the whole earth. 36Be always on the watch, and pray that you may be able to escape all that is about to happen, and that you may be able to stand before the Son of Man."


      The statement about not knowing the time of His return is absent. Instead, we see Him talking about escaping "all that is about to happen."

      Also, only in the Luke account do we see these statements:

      22For this is the time of punishment in fulfillment of all that has been written.

      28When these things begin to take place, stand up and lift up your heads, because your redemption is drawing near."


      What message do you suppose the Spirit of God is giving us by these diffrences?

      Comment


      • #4
        another interesting aspect of Luke. Count how many times he used the word "immediately". Then count that word in the other 4 Gospels.
        Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think you are grasping at straws that are not there.

          Luke is a physician, a Greek, trained in the art of observation. He is a scientist of his day. His writing style is a natural outgrowth of his training with his emphasis on linear thought and detail.

          Simply demonstrates the character of the man God chose to write this Gospel account.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by keck553 View Post
            another interesting aspect of Luke. Count how many times he used the word "immediately". Then count that word in the other 4 Gospels.
            Actually, the three synoptics seem to use that word with relatively the same regularity. John only has it once. Unless I'm missing something? I just did a quick search on biblegateway.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by RabbiKnife View Post
              I think you are grasping at straws that are not there.

              Luke is a physician, a Greek, trained in the art of observation. He is a scientist of his day. His writing style is a natural outgrowth of his training with his emphasis on linear thought and detail.

              Simply demonstrates the character of the man God chose to write this Gospel account.
              I would suggest that you may be closing your eyes to what IS there, the clear and consistent and undeniable theme contained in these differences. What would "linear thought and detail" have to do with him not mentioning the disciples deserting Christ? If He was that concerned with detail, wouldn't he have mentioned the disciples fleeing?

              Remember, these words were recorded by Yahweh's spirit, for a purpose. Any details that were included or excluded in these accounts were done so for a reason.

              What differnce does him being a "Greek" make? In Christ, there is neither Jew nor Greek.

              I would say to you and to everyone, look past the man of flesh who held the pen, and look into what the Spirit of Yahweh is telling us by these differences. He is saying something very important. And I haven't even shown half of them.

              Comment


              • #8
                Immediately for me speaks to the authority of Yeshua. Even in John, chapter 13 when He told Judas to leave and do what he must do.....

                Joh 13:27 And after the morsel, then Satan entered into that one. Then Jesus said to him, What you do, do quickly.
                Joh 13:28 But no one of those reclining knew this, for what He spoke to him;
                Joh 13:29 for some thought, since Judas held the moneybag, that Jesus was saying to him, Buy what things we have need of for the feast; or that he should give something to the poor.
                Joh 13:30 Then, receiving the morsel, he immediately went out. And it was night.


                Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The words say what the words say.

                  Trying to "spiritualize" the Bible to find some deep, hidden meaning that the Spirit of God has revealed only to an elite few is the beginning of every cult ever conceived.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Joey Porter View Post
                    I would suggest that you may be closing your eyes to what IS there, the clear and consistent and undeniable theme contained in these differences. What would "linear thought and detail" have to do with him not mentioning the disciples deserting Christ? If He was that concerned with detail, wouldn't he have mentioned the disciples fleeing?

                    Remember, these words were recorded by Yahweh's spirit, for a purpose. Any details that were included or excluded in these accounts were done so for a reason.

                    What differnce does him being a "Greek" make? In Christ, there is neither Jew nor Greek.

                    I would say to you and to everyone, look past the man of flesh who held the pen, and look into what the Spirit of Yahweh is telling us by these differences. He is saying something very important. And I haven't even shown half of them.
                    Not all true. Yeshua Himself said "To the Jew first". We are only one, because we Gentiles are grafted in. You take on the identity of Jesus, He doesn't take on yours.
                    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Joey Porter View Post
                      By now, it should come as no surprise to anyone reading this that Luke does not mention the disciples deserting Him.


                      So, the question is, why do we see Luke's recollection of these events differing from the other two gospels in such a way that it paints a far closer relationship between the Lord and His disciples than do the other two gospels?

                      Why, in Luke ONLY:

                      -do the disciples "leave everything?"

                      -did He spend an extra night with the disciples on the mount of transfiguration?

                      -did He tell the disciples His blood was to be poured out for them, as opposed to "many?"

                      -did He NOT tell the disciples that they would desert Him?

                      -is it not mentioned that the disciples deserted Him?

                      -did He tell the disciples that they were to stay in the city until clothed with power from on high?

                      -is it mentioned that He opened their minds to understand the scriptures?

                      So, what is Luke trying to tell us here?
                      Well it is a matter of interpretation. First I would like to point out that in Luke it does talk about the disciples deserting Jesus during the hour of darkness.

                      25And he said unto them, The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are called benefactors.
                      26But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.

                      31And the Lord said, Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat:
                      32But I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren.
                      33And he said unto him, Lord, I am ready to go with thee, both into prison, and to death.
                      34And he said, I tell thee, Peter, the cock shall not crow this day, before that thou shalt thrice deny that thou knowest me.

                      I think that these passages try and elaborate as to the reason the disciples fled in the hour of darkness. Also as to why they must need to desert him in this hour because it was prophesy and because the benefactor is also made as the servant.
                      The disciples left everything meaning they left there former lives to follow Jesus meaning literally follow him and his words also meaning literally follow him in the hour of darkness. This is how they deserted him but Jesus prayed for them that they would not fail and they would be converted afterwards.

                      They spent the night in the mount whether or not this is a matter of interpretation.

                      I think he told them the blood was to be poured out as a example not as a literal saying. So as to who exactly it was poured out on is folly.

                      Again it is mentioned about the disciples deserting him in the hour of darkness. But that Jesus had prayed for them that they are converted even after this.

                      Luke has details mentioned in his scriptures they are well worth looking into. Could you elaborate more on exactly where your going with this?

                      Remember this verse
                      26But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by keck553 View Post
                        Immediately for me speaks to the authority of Yeshua. Even in John, chapter 13 when He told Judas to leave and do what he must do.....

                        Joh 13:27 And after the morsel, then Satan entered into that one. Then Jesus said to him, What you do, do quickly.
                        Joh 13:28 But no one of those reclining knew this, for what He spoke to him;
                        Joh 13:29 for some thought, since Judas held the moneybag, that Jesus was saying to him, Buy what things we have need of for the feast; or that he should give something to the poor.
                        Joh 13:30 Then, receiving the morsel, he immediately went out. And it was night.


                        I see. I actually looked up the NIV version when searching the word. The KJV is a little different. I have not yet studied this issue with a concordance though.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by keck553 View Post
                          Not all true. Yeshua Himself said "To the Jew first". We are only one, because we Gentiles are grafted in. You take on the identity of Jesus, He doesn't take on yours.

                          He instructed us to see past the flesh, which profits nothing. Physical, fleshly Israel was merely a type of the church - the true Israel. We must look at things spiritually at this point to have an understanding of what the Spirit may be trying to tell us.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Zack702 View Post
                            Well it is a matter of interpretation. First I would like to point out that in Luke it does talk about the disciples deserting Jesus during the hour of darkness.

                            25And he said unto them, The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are called benefactors.
                            26But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.

                            31And the Lord said, Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat:
                            32But I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren.
                            33And he said unto him, Lord, I am ready to go with thee, both into prison, and to death.
                            34And he said, I tell thee, Peter, the cock shall not crow this day, before that thou shalt thrice deny that thou knowest me.

                            I think that these passages try and elaborate as to the reason the disciples fled in the hour of darkness. Also as to why they must need to desert him in this hour because it was prophesy and because the benefactor is also made as the servant.
                            The disciples left everything meaning they left there former lives to follow Jesus meaning literally follow him and his words also meaning literally follow him in the hour of darkness. This is how they deserted him but Jesus prayed for them that they would not fail and they would be converted afterwards.

                            They spent the night in the mount whether or not this is a matter of interpretation.

                            I think he told them the blood was to be poured out as a example not as a literal saying. So as to who exactly it was poured out on is folly.

                            Again it is mentioned about the disciples deserting him in the hour of darkness. But that Jesus had prayed for them that they are converted even after this.

                            Luke has details mentioned in his scriptures they are well worth looking into. Could you elaborate more on exactly where your going with this?

                            Remember this verse
                            26But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.

                            I will get straight to the point of where I'm going.

                            The knowledge is in the differences of the gospels. When the gospels all harmonize on an account, we can take it for what it's worth. However, when certain details are included or excluded or changed by one writer or another, that is telling us something.

                            The issue with Peter denying the Lord is mentioned in all three synoptic gospels, so we can take that for what it's worth. But remember, it's the differences that tell us something.

                            Let me show you what I mean. In Luke at the Passover meal account, in direct contrast to "falling away," the Lord tells the disciples

                            Luke 22
                            28You are those who have stood by me in my trials.

                            Only Luke mentions this. The other two gospels have the Lord telling His disciples that they will desert Him. You can be sure this is telling us something.

                            I'll get straight to the point. The gospel of Luke is directed towards the "end of the age" elect who will not desert Him, who will leave everything to follow Him (like Lot), stand by Him in His trials, and who will know the time of His coming (see above in the third post of this thread).

                            This group of elect will NOT taste death but will ascend alive because they will be prepared for His return, and stand by Him in His trials. This is why only in the Luke "Olivet Discourse" does the Lord say "Lift up your heads because your redemption is drawing near."

                            This is also why only the gospel of Luke ends with the disciples "continually in the temple, praising God." Our body is our temple. The elect will not leave their temple, but their temple will be transformed alive into an incorruptible body at which time they will ever worship God (See also the letter to the church in Philadelphia in Revelation This church represents the end time elect as well).

                            One more thing I would point out to you now (although there are many more things I could point out that would only further solidify this truth):

                            The last words of Christ on the cross as recorded in each gospel also give us an understanding of this.

                            In Matthew, it's: "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?"

                            In Mark, it's: "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?"

                            But in Luke, it's "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit."

                            Again, the revelation is in the differences.

                            There are many, many more points that I could highlight if anyone is interested in this at all.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Joey Porter View Post
                              I would suggest that you may be closing your eyes to what IS there, the clear and consistent and undeniable theme contained in these differences. What would "linear thought and detail" have to do with him not mentioning the disciples deserting Christ? If He was that concerned with detail, wouldn't he have mentioned the disciples fleeing?

                              Remember, these words were recorded by Yahweh's spirit, for a purpose. Any details that were included or excluded in these accounts were done so for a reason.

                              What differnce does him being a "Greek" make? In Christ, there is neither Jew nor Greek.

                              I would say to you and to everyone, look past the man of flesh who held the pen, and look into what the Spirit of Yahweh is telling us by these differences. He is saying something very important. And I haven't even shown half of them.
                              Actually, RabbiKnife is correct.

                              Luke didn't witness what Jesus did. Luke wasn't there. Luke had no interaction with Jesus. He even stated at the beginning of his gospel that he was writing down what happened from other eye witnesses. This means he most likely interviewed the disciples in a precise manner (being a Greek doctor) that gives us more accuracy than the other three Gospels.

                              We have to pay attention to the culture of Luke because it explains why he wrote the way he did and why he included what he did. He probably relied on Mark's Gospel as well as other eye witness accounts for completing his Gospel. This doesn't mean it's not inspired or that it's not true - it merely means we have to take these things into consideration when reading Luke so as to find a proper interpretation.

                              The reason it's more detailed is because it came form eye witnesses and, being a physician, he was a detailed man.


                              Also, as a side note: when the Bible tells us to "look past flesh" or that "the flesh profits nothing," it's referring to our sin nature, not to our physical bodies or to our culture. To assert otherwise is to accept a Gnostic rendering of the Bible (Marcion, for instance, believed the flesh was lower than the spirit). The fact is, the spirit and the physical world are equal, thus both must be considered when reading the Bible.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X