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  • How do you study the Bible?

    Curious as to how others do it - systematically through a book? Follow a theme? Word studies? Software? Daily dated notes? What helps you?

  • #2
    I start right in Genesis and go through to Revelation. That way I never leave anything out.

    I read Psalms every day with my kids, and right now we are reading Genesis together, so that is in addition to my own personal study.
    My Blog

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    • #3
      Recently, I've been focusing on 1 book at a time. Someone on this forum mentioned that in another thread, so I've taken to it and I like this method. For instance, I just finished John and Acts and now I'm reading Romans - that's my main focus...to really take a deeper look into that particular book - comparing different versions and also letting it prompt some of my prayers as I read through it, but I'll move around a little bit too. If a sermon mentions a certain bible story, or if I hear some friends discussing a topic that I'm curious about, I like to try and make the time to look it up and study it out that same day. I may read that story/area and then go back to Romans the next day or later that day. Or sometimes I'll read Proverbs...there are 31 chapters and 31 days of the month so, today being the 31st, I might read the 31st chapter after I finish my Romans study.

      Make sense? Romans is my focus, but if someone says "remember what Ruth did?"...then I make it a point to go find out or re-analyze what exactly Ruth did.

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      • #4
        I read the book I like and study in depth what jumps out and leave the rest.
        Then I read it again and other things jump out and I study that and read the rest.

        Then I change books and repeat.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bethany67 View Post
          Curious as to how others do it - systematically through a book? Follow a theme? Word studies? Software? Daily dated notes? What helps you?
          Read it, pray on it. Come to this forum as well as speak to others from time to time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Whispering Grace View Post
            I start right in Genesis and go through to Revelation. That way I never leave anything out.

            I read Psalms every day with my kids, and right now we are reading Genesis together, so that is in addition to my own personal study.
            The Psalms are always enlightening and can lift you up when being down. I think that's one of their major purposes within the bible. I wouldn't recommend reading revelations too much, unless you feel like God has called you to look into something specific.

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            • #7
              I have three different bibles. Nelson's Study Bible, Hebrew-Greek Bible, Chronological Bible: The life and Times Historical Reference Bible. I have the Strongs, and several Bible Dictionaries. I also study the culture and lifestyles and have many books on that.

              I grab a chapter in the bible, and begin studying. I have a couple sets of commentaries, but really and truly I seldom ever pick one up and read it. My Son-in-law likes to read them, so I am thinking of giving them to him. Only reason I haven't yet; is he keeps coming back over to read them. I see my daughter more this way.

              Galatians 2: 20
              I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.

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              • #8
                I read by topic daily. For instace, I read a book of Law on Monday, a book of History on Tuesday, Poetry, Prophecy, a Gospel, etc on other days.

                Then I journal about it, finding its application in my life, and end with a second prayer for help in applying what it said. That is my morning devotion.

                At night, I do much the same as Sherrie above. I take a topic that I am reading on and dig deep using other tools. Sometimes it is reference material, sometimes it is online tools, sometimes it is outside teachers. I love to wander all different types of media and dig deeper. I have started a beginners Hebrew course too. I figure one day I will be in New Jerusalem where the streets are paved with gold and the street signs will be written in Hebrew. I really don't want to get lost on my way to the Throne Room

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Friend of I AM View Post
                  The Psalms are always enlightening and can lift you up when being down. I think that's one of their major purposes within the bible. I wouldn't recommend reading revelations too much, unless you feel like God has called you to look into something specific.
                  I guess reading Revelation depends on your view. You can either view it as a Glorious promise of a Happy Ending, or you can view it as doom and gloom.

                  I like to view it as the "period" at the end of God's statement of promise. All the prophecy left in the bible left for Him to fullfill makes me leap as I see things come to pass. I can't wait for the day which it will all be fulfilled and God will turn to everyone and say "See, I told you so". And we'll all have a good laugh...Yes, Lord, you did, didn't you.

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                  • #10
                    I ask questions... Lots of them.

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                    • #11
                      I have acquired a vast library of research material but for my everyday study I work with the Concordance {both Young’s and Strong’s} Analytical and Critical Lexicons, Interlinear, Kittel’s Theological Dictionary of NT, Vines Expository, and of coarse my Bible.

                      My study approach is three prong

                      The Bible is the written word and will of God. That God is the author, with over 40 writers, who were inspired by revelation from God to write the Word.

                      The Bible in its original God breathed form was without errors. Any seemingly errors or contradictions come from misunderstanding, mistranslation, errors in transmission, or deliberate forgeries.

                      The Bible interprets itself, and fits together like an intricate jigsaw puzzle. It is up to us to see how it fits by rightly dividing the Word of truth. We do not interpret the Bible; we see how the Bible interprets itself with the various keys and principle of biblical research.

                      Following is my basic outline for research principles, by no means is it exhaustive, just the basics; I am sure some of you can add to this.




                      keys to research:

                      The first key is laid out in John16:13a
                      Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, it will guide you into all truth.(or one truth)

                      The second underline key to research is to always “read what is written” . Not what you think is written, and not what you already believe is written…….. but what is written. When the Bible states “about 120” {Acts 1:15} it is not 120 …it may be 119.99999 but it’s not 120.
                      Along the same lines pay attention to nouns, pronouns and the preposition that governs them. Of coarse all grammatical structure is important but this will help immensely in deciphering events or accounts in the Bible.


                      1.) In the verse

                      a.) 80% of the bible interprets itself in the verse where it is written.
                      b.) Words in the verse must be interpreted according to the meaning of the words at the time of usage.
                      c.) Difficult verses must be understood in light of clear verses ….relating to the same subject
                      d.) Any one verse must always be in harmony with scripture relating to the identical subject
                      e.) One scripture may not tell all the details; other scripture may add to it without contradicting each other. Scripture build up {especially in the Gospels} helps to illuminate the complete message.




                      2.) In the context

                      a.) If the Word does not interpret itself the verse, context will determine the meaning of the verse or verses in question.
                      b.) Context as related to whom it is written or the specific subject can be determined by either the immediate context, or remoter context.
                      c.) The context relating to the same or similar: subject must be kept within the administrative boundaries. You cannot correlate in part or in whole the same subject from two separate dispensations (administrations) unless they relate directly and identically (i.e.) mixing the Gospels subjects with Epistles subjects.


                      3.) Previous usage

                      When you have a word that neither the verse nor the context determines its interpretation, going back to the first usage of that word will generally illuminate its meaning. Checking the first use of that word (using a concordance) in the verse should determine its meaning; the meaning will remain the same throughout, unless it is given a new definition in which case that will carry the consideration

                      Other considerations

                      Little words with big meanings prepositions and conjunctions are especially important when directing the flow of thought in context.
                      a.) The use of the article “the” must be carefully noted especially when dealing with the subject of holy spirit
                      b.) The word all is used just as it is used today, context will determine its meaning, whether it is all without exception, or all with distinction.
                      c.) The use of but and not must be recognized for the degree of contrast or negation they signify in a passage

                      Time words must be carefully noted in regard to whether an event occurs in the past, present, or future.

                      In the beginning
                      The word beginning or in the beginning must be carefully examined to determine which beginning. At times this refers to Genesis, other times it refers to the beginning of an event in an administration; context will determine the value of the word. {i.e.} The day of Pentecost in the grace administration


                      To whom it is written
                      The Bible is always addressing either Jews, Gentiles, or Church of God …….




                      All those things
                      Punctuation, capitalization, chapter headings, chapter divisions, and verse divisions were all added by translators. They are extremely helpful, but they are not “given by inspiration of God” The majority of these thing have been well supplied but there are a good number of areas where they are inaccurate. Always rely on the context to determine the truth

                      Customs and cultures
                      The Bible is riddled with references to the everyday customs of the time in which it was written. We should become familiar with the manner of life, idioms, orientalisms, customs and culture to properly understand scripture.

                      Figures of Speech
                      There are 219 figures of speech known in the world 214 of them are used in the Bible. It is not imperative to know these, but helpful in research and study. E. W. Bullinger has documented these figures of speech with scriptural reference, which makes it easy to look up.

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                      God Bless
                      azheis

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