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  • The Greatest Christian Sin

    The Greatest Christian Sin
    Aug 14, '08 9:33 PM

    Sitting before my computer tonight, I was hoping I'd be a little more lenient in thinking of a title for today's devotion. Yet, no matter how hard I try to make it more appealing, I just kept on going back to the original plan: to entitle today's devotion as The Greatest Christian Sin.

    I always hoped the day won't come when I have to write against Christians, but God has been revealing to me a series of events that strongly points me to write something like this. I know that I will draw a sea of people who would disagree with me. Sadly, Jesus also weren't so popular to the Jews in his days. Even so, I thought I'd rather write this one, putting on the line those who would continue to read and those who would stop at this point because I am teaching something different from what they do.

    Therefore, I'll say this plainly before you continue to read... that what you will see beyond this point is true. I may become unpopular to those who wants me to write all the good about Christianity. But I realized that it's better be unpopular and remind everyone the will of the Father, rather than be popular and conceal the Word. For even Jesus has said, seek not to please man, but the Father who is in heaven.

    The reading for today is simple. It says,


    Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another."

    John 13:34-35


    As I browse the books I have here, one thing that struck me most was an 11-word sentiment from Mahatma Gandhi that leaves a devastating scar to Christianity. He said, "I like your Christ, but I do not like your Christians." That alone are very strong words from a good man who never became a Christian because of the things he sees in us.

    How can we proclaim salvation to man in the name of Christ when people around us can say such things against us? How can we lead them to know Christ when we are guilty of such claims from our neighbors? Remember, people like Gandhi will not say things like that unless he sees plainly the essence of who we are.

    The problem with many Christians today is that we are very judgmental and legalistic. I am very saddened for the fact that we Christians give the atheists a chance to say this in front of us: "Christianity is composed of two things: a holy God, and a group of unholy followers."

    Sometimes, I ought to ask myself: Should I reprimand Christians? Should I debate pastors and priests? In all those opportunities I sat back, hoping that someday someone would be brave enough to do what I wanted to do. But lest if I didn't move, who would? I am reminded that even I myself as a Christian should evangelize Christians as well, not just non-Christians.

    When people ask us, we are quick to answer: "I am a Christian. I am a Christian who violates Intellectual Property Rights, I am a Christian who watches pornography, I am a Christian who smokes, who drinks liquor, who gamble, who curse others, who justifies my sins, who humiliates others and despise my brothers, who tramples over my neighbors and cause them to sin. Oh and by the way, I believe in Jesus Christ."

    Brothers and sisters, that's what Christians are right now. Two thousand years after the death of Christ, Christianity has turned into a kind of faith where people hate one another. What has happened to us? What has happened to the Christian faith that our forefathers have fought so hard with their lives? So hard that they were skinned alive, beheaded, crucified, and impaled to death? Where's the Christianity that they have worked so hard to proclaim?

    Do you know why Christianity spread so fast in the years following Jesus' death and ressurection? It's because early Christians are filled with love and compassion. They gave their all to God and became servants of the people. They totally gave up everything to be born again. That's what we have lost over the years. Not only did we lose that gripping power of the Holy Spirit in us, we even went so far as to divide the Christian Church! Brothers and Sisters, why do you spend so much time dismantling other denominations and forgetting that we are all Christians in the end? Why do you spend so much of your energy fighting over man-made religions whilst forgetting the simple fact that the time spent to justify the division could better be spent to glorify God?

    Because of Christian arrogance, there was the Crusade, the Inquisition, and the Salem Witch Hunt that shed the blood of thousands. Men, Women, and Children are killed in those days and Christians justify them by saying: We murder our brothers in the name of Christ! My goodness, is this Christianity? No! This is blatant Belialism!

    Even today, though we do not murder, we are setting ourselves as a stumbling block for our neighbors in our arrogance. Yes, many Christians really are arrogant. How then can we proclaim Salvation with that kind of attitude?

    Let's be honest with each other. The Greatest Christian Sin is Not loving one another as Jesus loved us. Christians justify their stealing of Intellectual Property Rights. Pastors and Priests conceal the corruption of the church. Even the members of the church themselves justifies their denomination over the others when in fact it was rebellion that has caused the Christian Church to split. Much as man's rebellion that cracked our relationship with God. Archbishop Cruz, a high ranking official and respectable man has been charged of libel. How horrible could that be? A leader of the church being charged of such things? That's just ridiculous!

    Martin Luther, the father of the protestant revolution, at a time close to his death had a conversation with his wife in which his wife said, "Dear husband, you are too rude," and to my surprise he responded, "They are teaching me to be rude."

    Beloved, is this the way we ought to be? To be washed away by the sins of the world that we would regard sin as our teacher instead of God? Are we to justify our sins and thereby making ourselves look perfect when in fact we never were?

    One of the most courageous acts Pope John Paul II did in his lifetime is when he went in front of the public to apologize for the atrocities of the church against the people. He said: "How can one remain silent about the many forms of violence perpetrated in the name of the faith---wars of religion, tribunals of the Inquisition and other forms of violations of the rights of persons?"

    Brothers and sisters, if the Pope himself was humble enough to admit the wrongdoings of the church, why can't we?

    Remember my friends that we are brothers and sisters in Christ. We are all sinners and we need forgiveness and grace in His name. We tried so hard working out our salvation that we fail to realize that we often misjudge our actions and in turn make us evil ourselves. We are missing the very point of Christianity in evangelizing. What then, is the secret then of the early Christians?

    The Secret is this:


    Attack the sin, not the sinners.


    TODAY'S PRAYER

    Heavenly Father we thank You for this day that You have given us. Open our eyes O Lord, that we may see the glory and passion You had for us. Teach us to rebuke sins in our lives, Wash away our unkindness and prejudice. Help us be a living testimony of your love. Humble us so that we may repent for our mistakes with all our hearts, and guide us in our lives and help us all the more to draw people to you, and bring back the old glory of the Christian Faith.

    All these we pray in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.

    AMEN!

    Grace and Peace be with you.
    Last edited by july; Aug 15th 2008, 03:00 PM.

  • #2
    Thanks for the wake-up call. Sometimes we forget what and where we came from.

    God Bless!!
    John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that HE gave HIS only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in HIM should not perish, but have eternal life.


    My testimony: http://bibleforums.org/forum/showthread.php?t=137007

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    • #3
      The Greatest Christian Sin is Not loving one another as Jesus loved us

      The Greatest Christian Sin is Not loving one another as Jesus loved us

      We strive to do this, but it'll never fully happen in this life-time.
      Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
      C. S. Lewis

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      • #4
        dear brother... it is very possible...

        The love Jesus had for us can be described with one word: 'Unconditional'

        No matter how bad we are, how adulterous we are, no matter how sinful we are He still loved us... and that's the love He is looking for in every Christian. God will not tell us to do something that is impossible to do. That's self contradictory. Mark 10:27 holds a promise to each one of us... that when things get tough... always remember that everything is possible with God. Call on to Him at all times. Let's live up to that standards. Let's not listen to the lie this world put in our minds and hearts. We can love our brothers and sisters the same way Jesus loved us. The question is: Are we willing?

        Let's try to ponder on this question. Are we willing to love, or are our minds blocking the way?

        Paul was able to do it. The apostles were able to do it. I'm sure we can. If we are willing.

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        • #5
          I have yet to see this unconditional love in anyone except for the love we have for our own children.
          Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
          C. S. Lewis

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by july View Post

            As I browse the books I have here, one thing that struck me most was an 11-word sentiment from Matahma Gandhi that leaves a devastating scar to Christianity. He said, "I like your Christ, but I do not like your Christians." That alone are very strong words from a good man who never became a Christian because of the things he sees in us.

            I'm sure many will quote this to God when the books are openned.

            If Ghandi knew of Christ he is without excuse.
            Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
            C. S. Lewis

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            • #7
              Thank you for your post, July. It was a gentle reminder that I still have a long way to go.

              A regular reading of I Corinthians 13 would do all Christians a tremendous amount of good.

              V
              I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.
              - Mahatma Gandhi



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              • #8
                all we can do is pray for the power to do God's will. The only one who seemed to come close was Paul.
                Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
                C. S. Lewis

                Comment


                • #9
                  July, you will get no opposition from me.

                  Legalism in organized religion, and judgmental Christians, is why I no longer attend church anywhere.
                  The suffocating weight of that oppression, quenched my spirit and killed my joy. I couldn't hear God anymore...it was rules, measuring up to others expectations, scare tactics if you didn't fall in line, and so much more.

                  I will forever regret I didn't get out sooner, before I was brainwashed. It has taken years to undo the damage to my spirit.

                  For where the Spirit of the Lord is there is freedom. Thanks to God He has freed me. I would much rather have God judge me, He is merciful.

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                  • #10
                    Thank you for the food and drink.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "...from a good man who never became a Christian because of the things he sees in us."

                      We become Christian because of what we see in Jesus - not because of what we see in other men.

                      And by the way, even Jesus did not consider Himself 'good'.

                      So his rejection of Christianity is flawed in at least two areas.

                      Why didn't he become the Christian that he thought we should be - to show us the correct way?

                      Why didn't he renounce his own goodness, as Jesus did - to show us the corrwect way?

                      Why?
                      Because Mahatma (get the spelling right, at least) Gandhi was just as flawed as the rest of us.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Duane Morse View Post
                        "...from a good man who never became a Christian because of the things he sees in us."

                        We become Christian because of what we see in Jesus - not because of what we see in other men.

                        And by the way, even Jesus did not consider Himself 'good'.

                        So his rejection of Christianity is flawed in at least two areas.

                        Why didn't he become the Christian that he thought we should be - to show us the correct way?

                        Why didn't he renounce his own goodness, as Jesus did - to show us the corrwect way?

                        Why?
                        Because Mahatma (get the spelling right, at least) Gandhi was just as flawed as the rest of us.
                        Perhaps Gandhi would have seen Jesus as He is if those who profess to follow Him weren't quite so judgemental.

                        As far as spelling is concerned, I thought the original poster had made a typo. It happens. For instance:
                        Why didn't he renounce his own goodness, as Jesus did - to show us the corrwect way?


                        Of course the man was just as flawed as the rest of us. I don't think anyone has said otherwise. But he might have seen the Way of salvation had it not been for Christians. I got the following from a site called John Mark Ministries although I have heard the story before from many other sources:

                        Mahatma Gandhi is one of the most respected leaders of modern history. A Hindu, Ghandi nevertheless admired Jesus and often quoted from the Sermon on the Mount. Once when the missionary E. Stanley Jones met with Ghandi he asked him, "Mr. Ghandi, though you quote the words of Christ often, why is that you appear to so adamantly reject becoming his follower?"

                        Ghandi replied, "Oh, I don't reject your Christ. I love your Christ. It's just that so many of you Christians are so unlike your Christ."

                        Apparently Ghandi's rejection of Christianity grew out of an incident that happened when he was a young man practising law in South Africa. He had become attracted to the Christian faith, had studied the Bible and the teachings of Jesus, and was seriously exploring becoming a Christian. And so he decided to attend a church service. As he came up the steps of the large church where he intended to go, a white South African elder of the church barred his way at the door. "Where do you think you're going, kaffir?" the man asked Ghandi in a belligerent tone of voice.

                        Ghandi replied, "I'd like to attend worship here."

                        The church elder snarled at him, "There's no room for kaffirs in this church. Get out of here or I'll have my assistants throw you down the steps."

                        From that moment, Ghandi said, he decided to adopt what good he found in Christianity, but would never again consider becoming a Christian if it meant being part of the church.

                        How we treat those others tells e people MORE about what we believe, and what followibng Jesus means to us than all tracts we pass out, or all the fine semons we deliver.
                        I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.
                        - Mahatma Gandhi



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                        • #13
                          hi,

                          I'm sorry for the typo. I've changed it now... thanks for the heads up

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                          • #14
                            Kind of Ironic I was just thinking some of those thoughts last night.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Duane Morse View Post
                              And by the way, even Jesus did not consider Himself 'good'.
                              No - He was trying to get the young man to say whether he thought Jesus was God - which He knew He was - it's all through the gospels that he was VERY self-aware.



                              Why didn't he renounce his own goodness, as Jesus did - to show us the corrwect way?


                              Jesus never renounced His own goodness - and NONE of us has any intrinsic goodness - because "none is good, save God alone"...
                              Last edited by 9Marksfan; Aug 15th 2008, 11:52 PM. Reason: his to His

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