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The Fall of Man

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  • Discussion The Fall of Man

    Where does the phrase "the fall of man" come from?

    Why is the event of Adam's sin called a "fall"? Doesn't that make it sound accidental?

    Wouldn't it more appropriately be called "The Rebellion of Mankind"?
    You were made to think. It will do you good to think; to develop your powers by study. God designed that religion should require thought, intense thought, and should thoroughly develop our powers of thought.

    Charles G Finney



    http://holyrokker.blogspot.com

  • #2
    Re: The Fall of Man

    Probably being likened to
    lucifer cast out of heaven - satan fall like lightening - because of sin. Which is also called the rebellion and a few other phrases. Just words really. They are needed by some to attempt to enforce theological issues scripture does not even imply -sin nature, severed, out of fellowship, completely separated etc....
    From a biblical perspective, this is not necessary, much less true. Man's nature did not change and while scripture does not indicate Adam continued his relationship with God we know his descendants did.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The Fall of Man

      Originally posted by Sirus View Post
      Probably being likened to
      lucifer cast out of heaven - satan fall like lightening - because of sin. Which is also called the rebellion and a few other phrases. Just words really. They are needed by some to attempt to enforce theological issues scripture does not even imply -sin nature, severed, out of fellowship, completely separated etc....
      From a biblical perspective, this is not necessary, much less true. Man's nature did not change and while scripture does not indicate Adam continued his relationship with God we know his descendants did.
      Amen to that !

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Fall of Man

        I do not think it was a fall at all. I believe it was the plan of God otherwise why was the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world. I do not think this was a backup plan. I believe the Lamb slain is a part of the Creation and I believe 1 Cor. 15 teaches that.

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        • #5
          Re: The Fall of Man

          Originally posted by percho View Post
          I do not think it was a fall at all. I believe it was the plan of God otherwise why was the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world. I do not think this was a backup plan. I believe the Lamb slain is a part of the Creation and I believe 1 Cor. 15 teaches that.
          Hi, Percho-

          There's no before or after in eternity. Since time and space comprise the natural cosmos, God's omnipresence means He's everyWHERE and everyWHEN. He's at the foundation of the world right now, and everywhere/everywhen else, too. There is no sequential, linear time for God. Eternity is timelessness, not never-ending time.

          Bakes the noodle a bit, eh?!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The Fall of Man

            Originally posted by PneumaPsucheSoma View Post
            Hi, Percho-

            There's no before or after in eternity. Since time and space comprise the natural cosmos, God's omnipresence means He's everyWHERE and everyWHEN. He's at the foundation of the world right now, and everywhere/everywhen else, too. There is no sequential, linear time for God. Eternity is timelessness, not never-ending time.

            Bakes the noodle a bit, eh?!
            At least that's your hypothesis anyway

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            • #7
              Re: The Fall of Man

              Originally posted by holyrokker View Post
              Why is the event of Adam's sin called a "fall"? Doesn't that make it sound accidental?
              Not really. Even people who commit suicide by purposely jumping off buildings fall. "Fall" merely indicates a descent from a high place.

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              • #8
                Re: The Fall of Man

                Originally posted by TexUs View Post
                At least that's your hypothesis anyway
                New thread. Come beat on me over there for a minute.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The Fall of Man

                  Originally posted by PneumaPsucheSoma View Post
                  New thread. Come beat on me over there for a minute.
                  Not saying I disagree with it... I just won't say that my opinion might not be flawed due to nothing really spoken of this in the word.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: The Fall of Man

                    Originally posted by TexUs View Post
                    Not saying I disagree with it... I just won't say that my opinion might not be flawed due to nothing really spoken of this in the word.
                    Very true. But you have the Logos in you, Brother.

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                    • #11
                      Re: The Fall of Man

                      Originally posted by holyrokker View Post
                      Where does the phrase "the fall of man" come from?

                      Why is the event of Adam's sin called a "fall"? Doesn't that make it sound accidental?

                      Wouldn't it more appropriately be called "The Rebellion of Mankind"?
                      Adam "fell" to a lower estate of mortality in this "lower heaven". "Fall" indicated directionality in a spiritual sense of position, rather than an action that was inadvertant. Adam didn't say, "Whoops, I accidentally ate a fruit."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: The Fall of Man

                        Originally posted by PneumaPsucheSoma View Post
                        Hi, Percho-

                        There's no before or after in eternity. Since time and space comprise the natural cosmos, God's omnipresence means He's everyWHERE and everyWHEN. He's at the foundation of the world right now, and everywhere/everywhen else, too. There is no sequential, linear time for God. Eternity is timelessness, not never-ending time.

                        Bakes the noodle a bit, eh?!
                        I do not understand what you are saying relative to my post.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The Fall of Man

                          Originally posted by percho View Post
                          I do not understand what you are saying relative to my post.
                          The lamb slain "...since the foundation of the earth..."

                          Just expanding on your time reference. :-)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: The Fall of Man

                            Originally posted by PneumaPsucheSoma View Post
                            The lamb slain "...since the foundation of the earth..."

                            Just expanding on your time reference. :-)
                            It is certainly legitimate to think of that phrase as a time reference, or more accurately a sequence reference. But time isn't the real point. I believe the point of the phrase "since the foundation of the earth" is to highlight the fact that the propitiatory offering of Jesus on the cross was not an after thought but part of the original plan and the raison detre for the creation as it is.

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                            • #15
                              Re: The Fall of Man

                              Originally posted by BroRog View Post
                              It is certainly legitimate to think of that phrase as a time reference, or more accurately a sequence reference. But time isn't the real point. I believe the point of the phrase "since the foundation of the earth" is to highlight the fact that the propitiatory offering of Jesus on the cross was not an after thought but part of the original plan and the raison detre for the creation as it is.
                              I certainly don't disagree, especially about the significance of God's preliminary provision for redemption. If anything, I'm indicating how He was literally slain from the foundation of the world. :-)

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