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  • Information Biblical Teaching

    Teaching God's way.

    Deuteronomy 6:6-7 And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie dowm, and when you rise up."

    Exodus 24:12 Then the LORD said to Moses, "Come up to Me on the mountain and be there; and I will give you tablets of stone, and the law and the commandments which I have written, that you may teach them."

    Job 33:33 "....hold your peace, and I will teach you wisdom."

    Yes, there is a commandment in Scripture for all of God's people to teach. Many assume that teaching is something that 'teachers' are told to do, or for those who have the 'gift of teaching.' Many people operate in an religious environment where adults and children are separated in order to 'better teach' them by 'experts' using the latest teaching techniques.

    What many fail to understand is that teaching is not only commanded for all believers, it is something that in reality everyone does in some way - for better or worse. Even neglecting to teach our children teaches them something - often with negative resultes. So the question becomes - what and how should we teach?

    I don't think anyone will disagree that God knows best. And His instructions regarding the 'how' and 'what' are contained in His Word to us. There are five major Hebrew words that are used for the English word "teach." By examining these words , we can get a grasp on "how" we should teach. By examining the usages of these words, we can also see "what" we should teach. The principles of these concepts are carried over into the New Testament Scriptures and also show up in the Greek words used.

    In Matthew 22:37 - 38, Jesus names the principle commandment from which all the others emanate. In Matthew chapter 22, Jesus is using the beginning of what Jews call the "Sh'ma" This is not new. It is as old as Deuteronomy chapter 6, from where Jesus draws from the Torah. Contained within the same chapter 6, there is a command to teach "You shall teach them diligently to your children...".

    The Hebrew word used in chapter 6 for teach is 'shanan'. It means to 'sharpen or use a whet stone'. We all know a dull knife or sword will not cut. Children need to be sharpened (ahanan) . This shows a teaching method that shapens in preparation for conflict (not necessarily always physical conflict), or to 'teach by sharpeing'.

    Psa 127:4 Like arrows in the hand of a warrior, So are the children of one's youth.
    Psa 127:5 How blessed is the man whose quiver is full of them; They will not be ashamed When they speak with their enemies in the gate.

    The next Hebrew word used for teach is the word "yarah". It is spelled "yod-resh-hey"/ It is the root verb for the Hebrew word "Torah" (which is not fully translated by the word "law"). Torah is better translated 'instruction'. Yarah means 'to shoot or throw.' It means to 'teach by pointing the way.' Yarah can be found in Exodus 4:10-15. It is translated as 'teach'.

    Another Hebrew word for teach is "lamad." The Hebrew pictograph of this word shows a shephard's staff prodding the flow through a door. It reveals a method to "teach by showing the way." "Lamad" is used in Deuteronomy 4:-1-9 which also reveals 'what' is being taught and 'why' it is being taught. Psalm 51:10-13 tells us what motivated David to teach.

    The Hebrew word "Alaf" is another word for "teach". It means to be yoked together as a pair of oxen. Often a young ox was yoked with an expeeriencd ox in order to show by example. Alaf means to "teach by example". It is used in Job 33:33. Proverbs 22:25, and used with a negative effect (unequally yoked) in Proverbs 22:25

    Finally, the Hebrew word "yasar" is used as a 'teach' word. The Hebraic pictograph of it's letters "yod-samech-resh" shows a hand encircling a head. It literally means "to turn the head". This word is often translated into English as the words "chastise", "punish" or "correct". This method of teaching is to "teach by discipline." We find this word used in Deuteronomy 8:5, Proverbs 19:18, Psalm 94:12.

    "Yasar" is a very common word in the Bible, therefore it's correct interpretation is important. As with Psalm 94:12, we should read the English translations "chasten" and "discipline" and not rise up in opposition to what they imply for all of us. God's chastening hand is a loving and graceful one. We need to accept 'yasar' from the LORD as a gift.

    Considering the word 'yasar' literally means 'to turn the head.". we now can see why the term "stiff necked" is such a picture of rebellion.

    So, in reading Deuteronomy 10:12-16., noting the two possible responses to God's "yasar", let us not be stiff-necked!

    In the New Testament, teh word most often used for "teach" is the Greek word "didasko." It is the word used in Matthew 5:19. It's also where the English word "didactic" comes from.

    In Matthwe 29:18-20, we find what is referred to as "the Great Commission". Here, Jesus lists a set of commands for His followers. The English verbs are:

    Go
    Make diciples (teach in KJV)
    Immerse
    Teach

    The usage of this passage for various reasons in some believing communites sometimes belies what it really says. Even if it can be used to promote a denominational "mission statement" one must ask how well this is being done in light of the fact that there are four commands listed in thsi passage. For instance, 'going' is a priority, "immersing" is a priority, but is 'teaching" a priority? What is interesting for us is to note that two of the verbs in the Greek refer to teaching. The Greek word used in "make disciples" is "matheteuo". It means to teach in instruct someone to follow a set of precepts or instructions. In Matthew 22:20, the word for teach is the Greek word "didasko." It focuses on speaking as a method of teaching.

    Another Scripture that uses "didasko" is Colossians 1:27-28. Hebrews 5:12 sets up a relationship between spiritual maturity and teaching.

    In Ezekiel 44:23, we are reminded what Levi priests were to teach the people. As intermediaries, they were called to teach 'the difference.'

    "And they shall teach (yaray = shoot) My people the difference between the holy (k'desh) and the unholy (chol), and cause them to discern between the unclean (tamei) and the clean (t'hor)." --- The English translation doesn't tell the whole story....many think of "holy" as sinless, and "unclean" as a ritual issue having to do with "Old Testament laws." What we are actually reading about in this passage are two planes. First the division between 'holy' and 'unholy' is the division between "k'desh" (set apart for God) and "chol" (that which is not set apart for God - those things that are man-initiated, man-centered, and man-pleasing).

    Also the priests were to teach the people to learn to divide the "t'hor" (that which is the whole and brings unity) from "tamei" (that which is fragmented and causes fragmenting). These words are translated as 'clean' and 'unclean'.

    By having the priests teach the people to separate the 'holy' from the 'unholy,' God was preparing as way for the people to divide and determine God-centered from man-centered. This prepared the people to act in ways that were consistent with the character of God was enabling in them.

    People were also taught to separate the 'clean' from the 'uncelan.' God was preparing them to identify and separate out those things which hurt them in their relationship with God. When God's people have been taught the difference between 'clean' and 'unclean' they can choose to interact with things that bring wholeness to them spiritually instead of that which will fragment them and cause their relationship with God to be less whole.

    In the New Testament, we read this concept in 2 Corinthians 6:17 - 7:1. So think if this has any bearing on a believer today.

    Then read 1 Peter 2:9-10 and cross reference back to Ezekiel 44:23. What does Peter call those who follow Jesus? What is the responsibility of those so named?

    So now that we know the difference between 'k'desh' and 'chol', can we separate t'hor from tamei? Can we teach those distinctions?

    So is the command from God to teach undervalued in today's body of Messiah? Should we re-examine what we are teaching, why we are teaching, and how we are teaching?
    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

  • #2
    Originally posted by keck553 View Post
    Teaching God's way.

    Deuteronomy 6:6-7 And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie dowm, and when you rise up."

    Exodus 24:12 Then the LORD said to Moses, "Come up to Me on the mountain and be there; and I will give you tablets of stone, and the law and the commandments which I have written, that you may teach them."

    Job 33:33 "....hold your peace, and I will teach you wisdom."

    Yes, there is a commandment in Scripture for all of God's people to teach. Many assume that teaching is something that 'teachers' are told to do, or for those who have the 'gift of teaching.' Many people operate in an religious environment where adults and children are separated in order to 'better teach' them by 'experts' using the latest teaching techniques.

    What many fail to understand is that teaching is not only commanded for all believers, it is something that in reality everyone does in some way - for better or worse. Even neglecting to teach our children teaches them something - often with negative resultes. So the question becomes - what and how should we teach?

    I don't think anyone will disagree that God knows best. And His instructions regarding the 'how' and 'what' are contained in His Word to us. There are five major Hebrew words that are used for the English word "teach." By examining these words , we can get a grasp on "how" we should teach. By examining the usages of these words, we can also see "what" we should teach. The principles of these concepts are carried over into the New Testament Scriptures and also show up in the Greek words used.

    In Matthew 22:37 - 38, Jesus names the principle commandment from which all the others emanate. In Matthew chapter 22, Jesus is using the beginning of what Jews call the "Sh'ma" This is not new. It is as old as Deuteronomy chapter 6, from where Jesus draws from the Torah. Contained within the same chapter 6, there is a command to teach "You shall teach them diligently to your children...".

    The Hebrew word used in chapter 6 for teach is 'shanan'. It means to 'sharpen or use a whet stone'. We all know a dull knife or sword will not cut. Children need to be sharpened (ahanan) . This shows a teaching method that shapens in preparation for conflict (not necessarily always physical conflict), or to 'teach by sharpeing'.

    Psa 127:4 Like arrows in the hand of a warrior, So are the children of one's youth.
    Psa 127:5 How blessed is the man whose quiver is full of them; They will not be ashamed When they speak with their enemies in the gate.

    The next Hebrew word used for teach is the word "yarah". It is spelled "yod-resh-hey"/ It is the root verb for the Hebrew word "Torah" (which is not fully translated by the word "law"). Torah is better translated 'instruction'. Yarah means 'to shoot or throw.' It means to 'teach by pointing the way.' Yarah can be found in Exodus 4:10-15. It is translated as 'teach'.

    Another Hebrew word for teach is "lamad." The Hebrew pictograph of this word shows a shephard's staff prodding the flow through a door. It reveals a method to "teach by showing the way." "Lamad" is used in Deuteronomy 4:-1-9 which also reveals 'what' is being taught and 'why' it is being taught. Psalm 51:10-13 tells us what motivated David to teach.

    The Hebrew word "Alaf" is another word for "teach". It means to be yoked together as a pair of oxen. Often a young ox was yoked with an expeeriencd ox in order to show by example. Alaf means to "teach by example". It is used in Job 33:33. Proverbs 22:25, and used with a negative effect (unequally yoked) in Proverbs 22:25

    Finally, the Hebrew word "yasar" is used as a 'teach' word. The Hebraic pictograph of it's letters "yod-samech-resh" shows a hand encircling a head. It literally means "to turn the head". This word is often translated into English as the words "chastise", "punish" or "correct". This method of teaching is to "teach by discipline." We find this word used in Deuteronomy 8:5, Proverbs 19:18, Psalm 94:12.

    "Yasar" is a very common word in the Bible, therefore it's correct interpretation is important. As with Psalm 94:12, we should read the English translations "chasten" and "discipline" and not rise up in opposition to what they imply for all of us. God's chastening hand is a loving and graceful one. We need to accept 'yasar' from the LORD as a gift.

    Considering the word 'yasar' literally means 'to turn the head.". we now can see why the term "stiff necked" is such a picture of rebellion.

    So, in reading Deuteronomy 10:12-16., noting the two possible responses to God's "yasar", let us not be stiff-necked!

    In the New Testament, teh word most often used for "teach" is the Greek word "didasko." It is the word used in Matthew 5:19. It's also where the English word "didactic" comes from.

    In Matthwe 29:18-20, we find what is referred to as "the Great Commission". Here, Jesus lists a set of commands for His followers. The English verbs are:

    Go
    Make diciples (teach in KJV)
    Immerse
    Teach

    The usage of this passage for various reasons in some believing communites sometimes belies what it really says. Even if it can be used to promote a denominational "mission statement" one must ask how well this is being done in light of the fact that there are four commands listed in thsi passage. For instance, 'going' is a priority, "immersing" is a priority, but is 'teaching" a priority? What is interesting for us is to note that two of the verbs in the Greek refer to teaching. The Greek word used in "make disciples" is "matheteuo". It means to teach in instruct someone to follow a set of precepts or instructions. In Matthew 22:20, the word for teach is the Greek word "didasko." It focuses on speaking as a method of teaching.

    Another Scripture that uses "didasko" is Colossians 1:27-28. Hebrews 5:12 sets up a relationship between spiritual maturity and teaching.

    In Ezekiel 44:23, we are reminded what Levi priests were to teach the people. As intermediaries, they were called to teach 'the difference.'

    "And they shall teach (yaray = shoot) My people the difference between the holy (k'desh) and the unholy (chol), and cause them to discern between the unclean (tamei) and the clean (t'hor)." --- The English translation doesn't tell the whole story....many think of "holy" as sinless, and "unclean" as a ritual issue having to do with "Old Testament laws." What we are actually reading about in this passage are two planes. First the division between 'holy' and 'unholy' is the division between "k'desh" (set apart for God) and "chol" (that which is not set apart for God - those things that are man-initiated, man-centered, and man-pleasing).

    Also the priests were to teach the people to learn to divide the "t'hor" (that which is the whole and brings unity) from "tamei" (that which is fragmented and causes fragmenting). These words are translated as 'clean' and 'unclean'.

    By having the priests teach the people to separate the 'holy' from the 'unholy,' God was preparing as way for the people to divide and determine God-centered from man-centered. This prepared the people to act in ways that were consistent with the character of God was enabling in them.

    People were also taught to separate the 'clean' from the 'uncelan.' God was preparing them to identify and separate out those things which hurt them in their relationship with God. When God's people have been taught the difference between 'clean' and 'unclean' they can choose to interact with things that bring wholeness to them spiritually instead of that which will fragment them and cause their relationship with God to be less whole.

    In the New Testament, we read this concept in 2 Corinthians 6:17 - 7:1. So think if this has any bearing on a believer today.

    Then read 1 Peter 2:9-10 and cross reference back to Ezekiel 44:23. What does Peter call those who follow Jesus? What is the responsibility of those so named?

    So now that we know the difference between 'k'desh' and 'chol', can we separate t'hor from tamei? Can we teach those distinctions?

    So is the command from God to teach undervalued in today's body of Messiah? Should we re-examine what we are teaching, why we are teaching, and how we are teaching?
    Do we really know what the Messiah has commanded us to teach, and is that the same as it was in the OT concerning the Messiah?

    Is 52:10 The LORD hath made bare his holy arm in The eyes of all The nations; and all The ends of The earth shall see The salvation of our God.

    Mt 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
    Mt 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.

    Do we know what to teach?

    Lk 24:45 Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures,
    Lk 24:46 And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day:
    Lk 24:47 And that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.

    Are we teaching what the Messiah taught the disciples, as he expounded to them that which is written in the OT concerning himself?

    Do we believe and teach that which is written in the the law and the prophets and the psalms, as did the disciples as they listened to Jesus?

    God bless.

    Firstfruits

    Comment


    • #3
      I think we do know what, how and why to teach. The same God shows us the way throughout all 66 books, and none of it is contradictory, do you think?
      Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by keck553 View Post
        I think we do know what, how and why to teach. The same God shows us the way throughout all 66 books, and none of it is contradictory, do you think?
        I agree, however as the disciples did not yet have the NT everything they learnt or were taught was from the OT and it was from the OT that they understood who Jesus was, by those things he fulfilled, that were written about him.

        The sermon on the mount was according to what is written in the OT.

        When Jesus taught them to pray it was from the OT.

        How many of us know what is written in the OT that Jesus taught the disciples that they should teach?

        Firstfruits

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Firstfruits View Post
          I agree, however as the disciples did not yet have the NT everything they learnt or were taught was from the OT and it was from the OT that they understood who Jesus was, by those things he fulfilled, that were written about him.

          The sermon on the mount was according to what is written in the OT.

          When Jesus taught them to pray it was from the OT.

          How many of us know what is written in the OT that Jesus taught the disciples that they should teach?

          Firstfruits
          We all have access to the OT, more than any time in history, furthermore we have an indwelt Teacher, so we are without excuse. Like Eve, we can blame false teachings, but standing before Jesus at the right hand of God, I don't think the victim game will play out well.

          Remember when Jesus 'opened their minds?' What He gave them was the bullseye that Torah aimed for. From that point on, they no longer had to strive in self effort to obey Torah's commands in actions only without the fullness of Torah's intent, and the plethora of man-made ordinances attached but now they had Messiah and would soon receive His indwelling Spirit who revealed and would teach the intent of Torah. They had a "living Torah", the very character of God among them to show them by "Alaf" (example) Torah's fullness.

          The intent of Torah was to show rightouesness does not come from without, but from within and through trust in the LORD. It was the stiffnecked nature that perverted Torah's intent to a list of do's and don'ts that became a burden instead of a blessing. God told them through Moses to put it on their hearts, so I don't think there was any room for excuse. It's always man's rebellion that perverts God's intent, and most likely will remain that way until our King returns.

          So yes, the Talmidim and Paul did teach from the TeNaKh, but it was in prefect harmony with Yeshua's ministry, because it taught Torah's fullness, not just a list of rules and ordinances and judgements to follow and make you feel rightoues, and not just a snapshot of God's righteousness, but the fullness of His righteousness offered as a free gift if received with a repentant, humble open and unpretencious heart.
          Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Firstfruits View Post
            I agree, however as the disciples did not yet have the NT everything they learnt or were taught was from the OT and it was from the OT that they understood who Jesus was, by those things he fulfilled, that were written about him.

            The sermon on the mount was according to what is written in the OT.

            When Jesus taught them to pray it was from the OT.

            How many of us know what is written in the OT that Jesus taught the disciples that they should teach?

            Firstfruits
            I relly cannot agree that 'the sermon on the mount was according to what is written in the Old Testament'. That it uses the Old Testament as a starting point we can all agree, but it goes far beyond anything taught in the Old Testament. Jesus' teaching was unique in its depth and its scope. There is in fact nothing like it anywhere elses. As the Jews themselves said, 'No one ever taught like this man'.

            Nor was the Lord's prayer just extracted from the Old Testament. No one in the Old Testament conceived of such a prayer. Once again in conception and depth it was unique.

            We can find an idea here and an idea there, but the Lord's prayer is a unique whole. It is not just made up of different Jewish snippets put together. When Jesus spoke of the Kingly Rule of God He meant something totally different from the Jews.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by petepet View Post
              I relly cannot agree that 'the sermon on the mount was according to what is written in the Old Testament'. That it uses the Old Testament as a starting point we can all agree, but it goes far beyond anything taught in the Old Testament. Jesus' teaching was unique in its depth and its scope. There is in fact nothing like it anywhere elses. As the Jews themselves said, 'No one ever taught like this man'.

              Nor was the Lord's prayer just extracted from the Old Testament. No one in the Old Testament conceived of such a prayer. Once again in conception and depth it was unique.

              We can find an idea here and an idea there, but the Lord's prayer is a unique whole. It is not just made up of different Jewish snippets put together. When Jesus spoke of the Kingly Rule of God He meant something totally different from the Jews.
              He certainly brought out the fullness, meaning and intent of His own Torah given at Sinai. Thank you Jesus.
              Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by keck553 View Post
                We all have access to the OT, more than any time in history, furthermore we have an indwelt Teacher, so we are without excuse. Like Eve, we can blame false teachings, but standing before Jesus at the right hand of God, I don't think the victim game will play out well.

                Remember when Jesus 'opened their minds?' What He gave them was the bullseye that Torah aimed for. From that point on, they no longer had to strive in self effort to obey Torah's commands in actions only without the fullness of Torah's intent, and the plethora of man-made ordinances attached but now they had Messiah and would soon receive His indwelling Spirit who revealed and would teach the intent of Torah. They had a "living Torah", the very character of God among them to show them by "Alaf" (example) Torah's fullness.

                The intent of Torah was to show rightouesness does not come from without, but from within and through trust in the LORD. It was the stiffnecked nature that perverted Torah's intent to a list of do's and don'ts that became a burden instead of a blessing. God told them through Moses to put it on their hearts, so I don't think there was any room for excuse. It's always man's rebellion that perverts God's intent, and most likely will remain that way until our King returns.

                So yes, the Talmidim and Paul did teach from the TeNaKh, but it was in prefect harmony with Yeshua's ministry, because it taught Torah's fullness, not just a list of rules and ordinances and judgements to follow and make you feel rightoues, and not just a snapshot of God's righteousness, but the fullness of His righteousness offered as a free gift if received with a repentant, humble open and unpretencious heart.
                From the following wasn't Christ concerned with what was written in the Torah about himself and what he came to fulfil?

                Mt 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
                Mt 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.

                Do we know what to teach?

                Lk 24:45 Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures,
                Lk 24:46 And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day:
                Lk 24:47 And that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.

                Is that not the gospel they were to teach/preach?

                Firstfruits

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by petepet View Post
                  I really cannot agree that 'the sermon on the mount was according to what is written in the Old Testament'. That it uses the Old Testament as a starting point we can all agree, but it goes far beyond anything taught in the Old Testament. Jesus' teaching was unique in its depth and its scope. There is in fact nothing like it anywhere else. As the Jews themselves said, 'No one ever taught like this man'.

                  Nor was the Lord's prayer just extracted from the Old Testament. No one in the Old Testament conceived of such a prayer. Once again in conception and depth it was unique.

                  We can find an idea here and an idea there, but the Lord's prayer is a unique whole. It is not just made up of different Jewish snippets put together. When Jesus spoke of the Kingly Rule of God He meant something totally different from the Jews.
                  Poor in spirit:

                  Is 66:2 For all those things hath mine hand made, and all those things have been, saith the LORD: but to this man will I look, even to him that is poor and of a contrite spirit, and trembleth at my word.

                  They that mourn:

                  Is 61:3 To appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the LORD, that he might be glorified.

                  The meek:

                  Ps 37:11 But the meek shall inherit the earth; and shall delight themselves in the abundance of peace.

                  Hunger and thirst:

                  Is 55:1 Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money; come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.
                  Is 55:2 Wherefore do ye spend money for that which is not bread? and your labour for that which satisfieth not? hearken diligently unto me, and eat ye that which is good, and let your soul delight itself in fatness.

                  The merciful:

                  Prov 11:17 The merciful man doeth good to his own soul: but he that is cruel troubleth his own flesh.

                  Pure in heart:

                  Ps 73:1 Truly God is good to Israel, even to such as are of a clean heart

                  Prov 22:11 He that loveth pureness of heart, for the grace of his lips the king shall be his friend.

                  Peace makers:

                  Prov 12:20 Deceit is in the heart of them that imagine evil: but to the counsellors of peace is joy.

                  Persecuted for righteousness:

                  Is 66:5 Hear the word of the LORD, ye that tremble at his word; Your brethren that hated you, that cast you out for my name's sake, said, Let the LORD be glorified: but he shall appear to your joy, and they shall be ashamed.

                  Ps 119:77 Let thy tender mercies come unto me, that I may live: for thy law is my delight.
                  Ps 119:78 Let the proud be ashamed; for they dealt perversely with me without a cause: but I will meditate in thy precepts.
                  Ps 119:79 Let those that fear thee turn unto me, and those that have known thy testimonies.

                  Prayer:

                  Mt 6:6 But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.
                  Mt 6:7 But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking.

                  Eccles 5:2 Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hasty to utter any thing before God: for God is in heaven, and thou upon earth: therefore let thy words be few.
                  Eccles 5:3 For a dream cometh through the multitude of business; and a fool's voice is known by multitude of words.

                  Eccles 5:7 For in the multitude of dreams and many words there are also divers vanities: but fear thou God.

                  Prov 17:27 He that hath knowledge spareth his words: and a man of understanding is of an excellent spirit.

                  I hope that helps to show that what Christ taught was according to what was written in the OT.

                  Firstfruits

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Beautiful. God's word is so awesome and full of life and promose. These are Christ's character. He inspired them, then came and taught them. Thank you!!
                    Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by keck553 View Post
                      Beautiful. God's word is so awesome and full of life and promose. These are Christ's character. He inspired them, then came and taught them. Thank you!!
                      Do we teach according to the law and the prophets as taught by Jesus to the Apostles and which they in turn have given us His Gospel?

                      His Gospel is according to that which is written in the law and the prophets and the Psalms.

                      Firstfruits

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Jesus is God. We teach according to His Word. Beginning at the beginning.

                        Paul made the statement below. At the time the only written word of God was in the Torah Scrolls, prophets and writings. Remember there was no 'New Testament'.

                        2Ti 3:16 All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness;
                        2Ti 3:17 so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every
                        good work.


                        Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by keck553 View Post
                          Jesus is God. We teach according to His Word. Beginning at the beginning.

                          Paul made the statement below. At the time the only written word of God was in the Torah Scrolls, prophets and writings. Remember there was no 'New Testament'.

                          2Ti 3:16 All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness;
                          2Ti 3:17 so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every
                          good work.


                          I agree,

                          As I said before they did not have the new testament, and therefore what ever they taught was according to the law and the prophets and the Psalms.

                          God bless you.

                          Firstfruits

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm going to attempt an analogy. Let's say you've been studying flying. You've taken ground school, you are aware of what all the surface controls do to the airplane. You understand the dynamics of lift, the dynamics of stalling, and what lies beneath your ability to prevent such a circumstance, that applying external power and yielding to the instructions with absolute trust. So you have all these instructions and knowledge, so you have an idea of what you will expereince.

                            However nothing can prepare you for actual flight.

                            This is a poor analogy, but the concept is similar. We can study God's definition of rightousness, and even sit in the simulator and do them, line by line. But until we turn the power on, rotate and gear up, we have no idea of the beauty of living them.

                            Most good pilots will tell you that the airplane, the instrutions and all the dynamics become and extension of them at some point, instead of a separate machine they have to strive to control. That's what God wants us to experience. He want's us to become an extension of His righteousness at some point, instead of a separate 'machine' we have to strive to control. God is not without mercy. He gave us the 'power' not to stall, the Holy Spirit, He gave us the control surfaces, that is His instructions.

                            So, do we need to know the 'flight instructions'? Of course. How could we possible become one with the airframe if we don't understand how it works? How can we tap the power that brings us into oneness if we push the stick in the wrong direction, or pull back on throttle at the wrong time? Even more, how can we understand we even need the power if we can't grasp the reasons why we need the power?

                            Interestingly, my 7 year old was 'acting up' in class last week. The teachers didn't knew exactly how to deal with him (he has high functioning Asbergers, so he's a little different than most kids). On the second day of bad behaviour, I sat him down and asked him if daddy had bad behaviour, and he said "no, you're good.". So I explained to him that I am not so good, but I have the power of God to help me control my behaviour. My 7 year old does know God by the way, he brings his 'red Bible' to school and sometimes sleeps with it. I told him God can give him the power to behave in school, just as He does with daddy. I saw this light come on in his eyes, and he said "oh, yeah, God can help me do this". So the rest of the week, he was a model student at school, and he's been walking around saying "I have the power." There were a few times he said he didn't feel like he had the power this weekend, but when that happened I asked him if he forgot to talk with God about it, and he said...oh..yeah, I need to ask God. He has a very special relationship with God. Sometimes he will say astounding things for a 7 year old. Yesterday, he saw a picture of my dad, and asked where he is. I told him my dad was with God. And he said "He's no longer in the ground, he is in heaven." I never taught him that. He just came up with it. He's got the childlike acceptance I wish I could have. In fact....

                            Psa 119:130 The unfolding of Your words gives light; It gives understanding to the simple.
                            Those who seek God with all their heart will find Him and be given sight. Those who seek their own agenda will remain blind.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by keck553 View Post
                              I'm going to attempt an analogy. Let's say you've been studying flying. You've taken ground school, you are aware of what all the surface controls do to the airplane. You understand the dynamics of lift, the dynamics of stalling, and what lies beneath your ability to prevent such a circumstance, that applying external power and yielding to the instructions with absolute trust. So you have all these instructions and knowledge, so you have an idea of what you will expereince.

                              However nothing can prepare you for actual flight.

                              This is a poor analogy, but the concept is similar. We can study God's definition of rightousness, and even sit in the simulator and do them, line by line. But until we turn the power on, rotate and gear up, we have no idea of the beauty of living them.

                              Most good pilots will tell you that the airplane, the instrutions and all the dynamics become and extension of them at some point, instead of a separate machine they have to strive to control. That's what God wants us to experience. He want's us to become an extension of His righteousness at some point, instead of a separate 'machine' we have to strive to control. God is not without mercy. He gave us the 'power' not to stall, the Holy Spirit, He gave us the control surfaces, that is His instructions.

                              So, do we need to know the 'flight instructions'? Of course. How could we possible become one with the airframe if we don't understand how it works? How can we tap the power that brings us into oneness if we push the stick in the wrong direction, or pull back on throttle at the wrong time? Even more, how can we understand we even need the power if we can't grasp the reasons why we need the power?

                              Interestingly, my 7 year old was 'acting up' in class last week. The teachers didn't knew exactly how to deal with him (he has high functioning Asbergers, so he's a little different than most kids). On the second day of bad behaviour, I sat him down and asked him if daddy had bad behaviour, and he said "no, you're good.". So I explained to him that I am not so good, but I have the power of God to help me control my behaviour. My 7 year old does know God by the way, he brings his 'red Bible' to school and sometimes sleeps with it. I told him God can give him the power to behave in school, just as He does with daddy. I saw this light come on in his eyes, and he said "oh, yeah, God can help me do this". So the rest of the week, he was a model student at school, and he's been walking around saying "I have the power." There were a few times he said he didn't feel like he had the power this weekend, but when that happened I asked him if he forgot to talk with God about it, and he said...oh..yeah, I need to ask God. He has a very special relationship with God. Sometimes he will say astounding things for a 7 year old. Yesterday, he saw a picture of my dad, and asked where he is. I told him my dad was with God. And he said "He's no longer in the ground, he is in heaven." I never taught him that. He just came up with it. He's got the childlike acceptance I wish I could have. In fact....

                              Psa 119:130 The unfolding of Your words gives light; It gives understanding to the simple.
                              When you do take off, you would therefore rely on what you have been taught, so it is in our best interest and maybe also the passengers that we remember what we have learnt and that it is up to date.

                              Firstfruits

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