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  • Putting Christ back into Christmas

    Here's a great little site that is promoting going back to the old Christmas values and memories and putting Christ back into Christmas.

    The site is offering free online video bibles (usually $24.99) to 1 million new users before Christmas.

    It's totally free - no catches and the video bible from WatchWord of the whole of the New testament is excellent. There's a automatic daily reading plane for each chapter and it keeps track of what you have already watched.

    www.bringbacktherealchristmas.com

    Spread the Word!

  • #2
    Originally posted by jefflenton View Post
    Here's a great little site that is promoting going back to the old Christmas values and memories and putting Christ back into Christmas.

    The site is offering free online video bibles (usually $24.99) to 1 million new users before Christmas.

    It's totally free - no catches and the video bible from WatchWord of the whole of the New testament is excellent. There's a automatic daily reading plane for each chapter and it keeps track of what you have already watched.

    www.bringbacktherealchristmas.com

    Spread the Word!
    Is it easy to put Christ back into a holiday he (and his disciples) originally had no part of (and yes, it was a holiday before Messiah, then to honor the birth of the pagan god Mithra).

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Emanate View Post
      Is it easy to put Christ back into a holiday he (and his disciples) originally had no part of (and yes, it was a holiday before Messiah, then to honor the birth of the pagan god Mithra).
      Watch it.......... people don't want you stepping on traditions that make them feel good and special. It is okay to be a revisionist and capture other's cultural events as our own, right or not..............

      Okay, I am just having fun.......... trying to cheer myself up.......
      Edify the brethren, love the brethren, and forgive the brethren until I have nothing left.

      www.woc-church.org

      Comment


      • #4
        There is nothing wrong with celebrating the birth of our Lord Jesus Christ.
        My Blog

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Whispering Grace View Post
          There is nothing wrong with celebrating the birth of our Lord Jesus Christ.
          There is something wrong with not worshipping Yeshua in Spirit and Truth. We are not free to worship Yeshua as we see fit. We are held accountable to how we associate Yeshau to other things in the world, somethings are unclean and under the surface defile our true intent. Hence, there is always a prescribed way to worship God, that is not avaliable to mankind to alter. There is a right way and a wrong way. The wrong way is always our way. The right way is always God way. Extra Biblical events have no prescribed anointing, appointment, or approbation, hence subject to human license.
          Edify the brethren, love the brethren, and forgive the brethren until I have nothing left.

          www.woc-church.org

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by manichunter View Post
            There is something wrong with not worshipping Yeshua in Spirit and Truth. We are not free to worship Yeshua as we see fit. We are held accountable to how we associate Yeshau to other things in the world, somethings are unclean and under the surface defile our true intent. Hence, there is always a prescribed way to worship God, that is not avaliable to mankind to alter. There is a right way and a wrong way. The wrong way is always our way. The right way is always God way. Extra Biblical events have no prescribed anointing, appointment, or approbation, hence subject to human license.
            They celebrated Christ's birth in the Bible.
            My Blog

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Whispering Grace View Post
              They celebrated Christ's birth in the Bible.

              No, they recognized the coming of the Messiah, not his birthday. Only one person in the NT mentions honoring "the child."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by manichunter View Post
                Watch it.......... people don't want you stepping on traditions that make them feel good and special. It is okay to be a revisionist and capture other's cultural events as our own, right or not..............

                Okay, I am just having fun.......... trying to cheer myself up.......

                Welcome back, brother.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had no idea it was originally a holiday for the god Mithra - here is a great article however that leaves me at peace with the holiday...

                  Origin of Christmas - The Biblical Account
                  The origin of Christmas is presented beautifully in the well-known biblical account of Luke: "And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed. (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.) And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child. And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered. And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn. And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid. And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord" (Luke 2:1-11).


                  Origin of Christmas - The Traditions and Controversies
                  For today's Christian, the origin of Christmas is, and should be, the birth of Jesus Christ as recorded in the Bible. Nothing more and nothing less. However, most of what we witness on December 25th each year has absolutely nothing to do with that blessed day, which probably occurred in late summer or early fall about 2,000 years ago. In fact, most of the customs and traditions of Christmas actually pre-date the birth of Jesus, and many of them are downright deceptive in their meaning and origin. Here are a few examples:

                  The date of December 25th probably originated with the ancient "birthday" of the son-god, Mithra, a pagan deity whose religious influence became widespread in the Roman Empire during the first few centuries A.D. Mithra was related to the Semitic sun-god, Shamash, and his worship spread throughout Asia to Europe where he was called Deus Sol Invictus Mithras. Rome was well-known for absorbing the pagan religions and rituals of its widespread empire. As such, Rome converted this pagan legacy to a celebration of the god, Saturn, and the rebirth of the sun god during the winter solstice period. The winter holiday became known as Saturnalia and began the week prior to December 25th. The festival was characterized by gift-giving, feasting, singing and downright debauchery, as the priests of Saturn carried wreaths of evergreen boughs in procession throughout the Roman temples.

                  Variations of this pagan holiday flourished throughout the first few centuries after Jesus Christ, but it probably wasn't until 336 AD that Emperor Constantine officially converted this pagan tradition into the "Christian" holiday of Christmas.


                  Origin of Christmas - What Really Matters?
                  The true origin of Christmas is filled with controversy and compromise. A quick study will reveal a number of disturbing roots that we haven't been able to cover in this brief article. In short, the Christmas holiday we celebrate today is indicative of Christianity's willingness to absorb the world's customs and traditions, and forget its simple roots in the historical reality of Jesus Christ. Christmas should be nothing more than a simple, yet wonderful reminder of Christ's humble beginning as a human child in this world. His birth merely set the stage for the power, glory, and salvation that would be revealed in His life, death, and resurrection! Whether it's December 25th, sometime in late September, or any other day of the year, we should use each and every opportunity to reflect on Jesus Christ and His message of hope for all of us.
                  I do not come into this pulpit hoping that perhaps somebody will of his own free will return to Christ. My hope lies in another quarter. I hope that my Master will lay hold of some of them and say, “You are mine, and you shall be mine. I claim you for myself.” My hope arises from the freeness of grace, and not from the freedom of will.
                  Charles Spurgeon

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by maasive10 View Post
                    I had no idea it was originally a holiday for the god Mithra - here is a great article however that leaves me at peace with the holiday...

                    Origin of Christmas - The Biblical Account
                    The origin of Christmas is presented beautifully in the well-known biblical account of Luke: "And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed. (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.) And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child. And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered. And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn. And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid. And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord" (Luke 2:1-11).

                    Origin of Christmas - The Traditions and Controversies
                    For today's Christian, the origin of Christmas is, and should be, the birth of Jesus Christ as recorded in the Bible. Nothing more and nothing less. However, most of what we witness on December 25th each year has absolutely nothing to do with that blessed day, which probably occurred in late summer or early fall about 2,000 years ago. In fact, most of the customs and traditions of Christmas actually pre-date the birth of Jesus, and many of them are downright deceptive in their meaning and origin. Here are a few examples:

                    The date of December 25th probably originated with the ancient "birthday" of the son-god, Mithra, a pagan deity whose religious influence became widespread in the Roman Empire during the first few centuries A.D. Mithra was related to the Semitic sun-god, Shamash, and his worship spread throughout Asia to Europe where he was called Deus Sol Invictus Mithras. Rome was well-known for absorbing the pagan religions and rituals of its widespread empire. As such, Rome converted this pagan legacy to a celebration of the god, Saturn, and the rebirth of the sun god during the winter solstice period. The winter holiday became known as Saturnalia and began the week prior to December 25th. The festival was characterized by gift-giving, feasting, singing and downright debauchery, as the priests of Saturn carried wreaths of evergreen boughs in procession throughout the Roman temples.

                    Variations of this pagan holiday flourished throughout the first few centuries after Jesus Christ, but it probably wasn't until 336 AD that Emperor Constantine officially converted this pagan tradition into the "Christian" holiday of Christmas.

                    Origin of Christmas - What Really Matters?
                    The true origin of Christmas is filled with controversy and compromise. A quick study will reveal a number of disturbing roots that we haven't been able to cover in this brief article. In short, the Christmas holiday we celebrate today is indicative of Christianity's willingness to absorb the world's customs and traditions, and forget its simple roots in the historical reality of Jesus Christ. Christmas should be nothing more than a simple, yet wonderful reminder of Christ's humble beginning as a human child in this world. His birth merely set the stage for the power, glory, and salvation that would be revealed in His life, death, and resurrection! Whether it's December 25th, sometime in late September, or any other day of the year, we should use each and every opportunity to reflect on Jesus Christ and His message of hope for all of us.

                    It all boils down to how we worship our Lord. The way of the heathen, our own way, or the Way of YHWH. What root will we choose? We can easily see that christmas, and its traditions are deeply rooted in paganism. So it is up to us individually and communally to decide with holidays we choose to observe and what traditions we use for these observances.

                    As for me and my house......

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      So, how about those of us who do celebrate Christmas as a way of honoring Christ? Are we somehow less than those who do not?
                      I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.
                      - Mahatma Gandhi



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vhayes View Post
                        So, how about those of us who do celebrate Christmas as a way of honoring Christ? Are we somehow less than those who do not?

                        That is not the issue. How is anyone less in the eyes of the Creator? Are we not all justified by the death, burial, and resurrection of the same Messiah? I will not tell you how to dress, nor will I tell you how you should worship.
                        Many can turn their heads from the pagan roots of many Christian observances and continue their worship as tradition states. I tried this route, but the conviction was too great after a few years. That conviction was my own. Nobody is "more" or "less" based on what days they observe, or do not observe.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Vhayes View Post
                          So, how about those of us who do celebrate Christmas as a way of honoring Christ? Are we somehow less than those who do not?
                          No, Sister. We are not "less than". We are all one in Christ Jesus.

                          There is absolutely nothing "pagan" about my adoration and worship of Jesus Christ. I love Him with all of my heart and soul, and rejoice in the fact that God so loved the world that He sent us His wonderful, precious Son!
                          My Blog

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I choose not to celebrate Christmas (or Easter) specifically because I was an active Pagan and very familiar with roots of the festivals which got co-opted by the established church. But I have no quarrel with those brothers and sisters who use them as an opportunity to thank the Father for Jesus. I don't see it as a hill to die on; it's a peripheral thing to me.

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