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  • The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

    I'm surprised this hasn't been mentioned already-

    photo moments before the attack



    CBS reporter's Cairo nightmare

    By MICHAEL SHAIN, DON KAPLAN and KATE SHEEHY

    Last Updated: 6:14 PM, February 16, 2011

    Posted: 1:19 AM, February 16, 2011



    "60 Minutes" correspondent Lara Logan was repeatedly sexually assaulted by thugs yelling, "Jew! Jew!" as she covered the chaotic fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo's main square Friday, CBS and sources said yesterday.

    The TV crew with Logan, who is also the network's chief foreign correspondent, had its cameras rolling moments before she was dragged off -- and caught her on tape looking tense and trying to head away from a crowd of men behind her in Tahrir Square.

    "Logan was covering the jubilation . . . when she and her team and their security were surrounded by a dangerous element amidst the celebration," CBS said in a statement. "It was a mob of more than 200 people whipped into a frenzy.

    "In the crush of the mob, [Logan] was separated from her crew. She was surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers.

    "She reconnected with the CBS team, returned to her hotel and returned to the United States on the first flight the next morning," the network added. "She is currently in the hospital recovering."

    A network source told The Post that her attackers were screaming, "Jew! Jew!" during the assault. And the day before, Logan had told Esquire.com that Egyptian soldiers hassling her and her crew had accused them of "being Israeli spies." Logan is not Jewish.

    In Friday's attack, she was separated from her colleagues and attacked for between 20 to 30 minutes, The Wall Street Journal said.

    Her injuries were described to The Post as "serious."

    CBS went public with the incident only after it became clear that other media outlets were on to it, sources said.

    "A call came in from The [Associated Press]" seeking information, a TV-industry source told The Post. "They knew she had been attacked, and they had details. CBS decided to get in front of the story."

    Most network higher-ups didn't even know how brutal the sexual assault was until a few minutes before the statement went out.

    "We were surprised it stayed quiet" as long as it did, one source said.

    Another source insisted that Logan was "involved in the process" of deciding whether to make her attack public, and ultimately understood why the statement had to be released.

    The horrific incident came a week after the 39-year-old reporter was temporarily detained by Egyptian police amid tensions over foreign coverage of the country's growing revolution.

    As part of the anti-media backlash, CNN's Anderson Cooper had also been roughed up, and ABC correspondent Brian Hartman had been threatened with beheading.

    "[Logan] was not in the country for long -- she'd been thrown out, if you remember -- and had just gone back in," one source said.

    "She had security with her, but it wasn't enough."

    Before the attack, Logan -- who is based in Washington, where she lives with her 2-year-old daughter and husband -- had been set to return to the States sometime over the weekend to tape a "60 Minutes" segment on Wael Ghonim.

    Ghonim, Google's head of marketing in the Middle East, had been briefly kidnapped after helping to organize protesters.

    But after she was assaulted, Logan went back to her hotel, and within two hours -- sometime late Friday and into early Saturday -- was flown out of Cairo on a chartered network jet, sources said.

    She wasn't taken to a hospital in Egypt because the network didn't trust local security there, sources said.

    And neither CBS nor Logan reported the crime to Egyptian authorities because they felt they couldn't trust them, either, the sources said. "The way things are there now, they would have ended up arresting her again," one source said.

  • #2
    Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

    Stuff like this just gets me so angry I can't really get too involved with it. My mother in law says my solutions are too brutal.
    This IGNORE button is by far one of the most useful tools I've used to keep my peace while navigating through some of the madness.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

      Originally posted by -SEEKING- View Post
      Stuff like this just gets me so angry I can't really get too involved with it. My mother in law says my solutions are too brutal.
      This is one of those times when anger is justified.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

        I've started to type at least 3 replies to this and had to stop and start over again because not one of them were reflecting a Christian attitude. I guess that means that I'm not as far in my walk or as close to my Lord as I should be.

        I'll just say that I'll be praying for this woman and her family and for the vile rapists who committed this atrocity instead.
        Day by day
        Oh Dear Lord
        Three things I pray
        To see thee more clearly
        Love thee more dearly
        Follow thee more nearly
        Day by day

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

          Originally posted by BrianW View Post
          I've started to type at least 3 replies to this and had to stop and start over again because not one of them were reflecting a Christian attitude. I guess that means that I'm not as far in my walk or as close to my Lord as I should be.
          Believe me when I tell you that I know EXACTLY what you mean.
          This IGNORE button is by far one of the most useful tools I've used to keep my peace while navigating through some of the madness.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

            I have had a hard time looking at that picture, it has bothered me for days. Are we looking right into the face of a man who did this? I dunno, but it's chilling.
            In Christ,
            Katie



            Romans 15:13 ~ May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

              I think she knows that she's in trouble at this point. It wouldn't surprise me if the men in this picture were some of the ones who assaulted her.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                Who knows what the response to this will be, so I'll say it carefully - Islam and the Koran (not speaking of Muslims - but of the ideology and the book) has no paradigm for the worth of a woman - i.e. what is reflected in Proverbs 31 or Ephesians 5. It is, from its roots, misogynistic. Thus the plight of women within radically Islamic contexts - they are either non-entities or objects of personal gratification in paradise. From its founder, Mohammed, on down, Islam is a radically anti-woman ideology.
                Last edited by the rookie; Feb 18th 2011, 08:19 PM.
                The Rookie

                Twelve is the number of government. Thus, it is quite apropos that I am on my way towards wielding the power of twelve bars - each bar like, say, a tribe.....or a star.....or, maybe an apostle. A blue apostle. Like apostle smurfs. Does anyone remember smurfs? And all the controversy about them being from the devil? It's probably bad that I juxtaposed "apostle" and "smurf" in the same sentence. But then, I probably lost you at "blue apostle". Yes, my friends, this is what "rare jewel of a person" is actually implying. "Rare Jewel of a Person" really means, "Potentially Insane".

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by the rookie View Post
                  Who knows what the response to this will be, so I'll say it carefully - Islam and the Koran (not speaking Muslims - but of the ideology and the book) has no paradigm for the worth of a woman - i.e. what is reflected in Proverbs 31 or Ephesians 5. It is, from its roots, misogynistic. Thus the plight of women within radically Islamic contexts - they are either non-entities or objects of personal gratification in paradise. From its founder, Mohammed, on down, Islam is a radically anti-woman ideology.
                  Yes it is.

                  Though we know many Christians were among the protesters too (I haven't heard about other religious faiths there..surely there are some). I saw this days ago on the news..they now show this photo with the faces in the background blurred out though I haven't heard them say why. I don't understand the rapist mind..so its confusing to me why they would attack the news crew when they just gotten the most joyous news of freedom from a dictator? Let alone feel the need to brutally attack and rape her? Rape is about humiliation and control ..very much the opposite of what they should have been feeling at that moment...freedom and relief of their oppressor. So I just don't understand why this happened then of all times...

                  My first thought on hearing this was they need to get these female news reporters out of these dangerous places! They should know how things are and acts of violence had been going on against the reporters for a couple of weeks by then so why wasn't she pulled out before this happened? I personally thought all of the news reporters should have been pulled out due to the attacks. Its not worth it...we don't need to know every little bitty thing going on there to risk the life and limb of these reporters. I think its just insane they were sent there to start with. It really makes me thinks these big news networks don't care about their employees at all. Let alone the women. Even if the women wanted to go I would be saying no for their own protection. Just made me sick to read this had happened.

                  A day or two on one of those morning shows they talked about the violence against women in general there. They showed a photo from the university there with a large group of women all dressed in casual clothes taken, I think, in the 70's. Then a few more moving forward on the dates. The style of clothing changed..the women were covered more...more and more wearing headscarves which this lady that grew up there said the women do as a way to feel some protection from the men...but even with women in full Burka they still get attacked. Nothing was said about them wearing these more and more because more and more were Muslims which I thought was a strange thing to leave out. But anyway the women feel they will have more rights now and feel safer ..I hope they are right.

                  God bless
                  "People do not drift toward holiness. Apart from grace-driven effort, people do not gravitate toward godliness, prayer, obedience to Scripture, faith, and delight in the Lord. We drift toward compromise and call it tolerance; We drift toward disobedience and call it freedom; We drift toward superstition and call it faith. We cherish the indiscipline of lost self-control and call it relaxation; we slouch toward prayerlessness and delude ourselves into thinking we have escaped legalism; we slide toward godlessness and convince ourselves we have been liberated?" - D A Carson

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                    Though we know many Christians were among the protesters too (I haven't heard about other religious faiths there..surely there are some).
                    I know for certain that many of Egypt's Christians are hedging their bets on a government that will actually respect their rights. I personally know one young Christian man who I graduated with who attended the protests and the mood among the Copts is hopeful. Mubarak was one of the most brutal dictators in the region, and his inaction against anti-Christian violence was tacit approval.

                    No matter what these men believe, they are awful people.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                      I read this a couple of days ago and it made me so angry!

                      Can you imagine what this poor woman has gone through. She'll never totally recover from this horrific experience.

                      Jeanne
                      Refrain your voice from weeping, and your eyes from tears, for your work shall be rewarded declares the Lord, and they (your children) will come back from the land of the enemy. Jeremiah 31:16-17
                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      Sometimes God lets you hit rock bottom so that you can discover He is the rock at the bottom

                      All the forces of darkness cannot stop what God has ordained. Isaiah 14:27

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                        Originally posted by moonglow View Post
                        Yes it is.

                        Though we know many Christians were among the protesters too (I haven't heard about other religious faiths there..surely there are some). I saw this days ago on the news..they now show this photo with the faces in the background blurred out though I haven't heard them say why. I don't understand the rapist mind..so its confusing to me why they would attack the news crew when they just gotten the most joyous news of freedom from a dictator? Let alone feel the need to brutally attack and rape her? Rape is about humiliation and control ..very much the opposite of what they should have been feeling at that moment...freedom and relief of their oppressor. So I just don't understand why this happened then of all times...

                        My first thought on hearing this was they need to get these female news reporters out of these dangerous places! They should know how things are and acts of violence had been going on against the reporters for a couple of weeks by then so why wasn't she pulled out before this happened? I personally thought all of the news reporters should have been pulled out due to the attacks. Its not worth it...we don't need to know every little bitty thing going on there to risk the life and limb of these reporters. I think its just insane they were sent there to start with. It really makes me thinks these big news networks don't care about their employees at all. Let alone the women. Even if the women wanted to go I would be saying no for their own protection. Just made me sick to read this had happened.

                        A day or two on one of those morning shows they talked about the violence against women in general there. They showed a photo from the university there with a large group of women all dressed in casual clothes taken, I think, in the 70's. Then a few more moving forward on the dates. The style of clothing changed..the women were covered more...more and more wearing headscarves which this lady that grew up there said the women do as a way to feel some protection from the men...but even with women in full Burka they still get attacked. Nothing was said about them wearing these more and more because more and more were Muslims which I thought was a strange thing to leave out. But anyway the women feel they will have more rights now and feel safer ..I hope they are right.

                        God bless
                        I am not defending what these men did - not at all. They are criminals and should be treated as such, although I would guess they will never be prosecuted. However - you say:
                        its confusing to me why they would attack the news crew when they just gotten the most joyous news of freedom from a dictator? Let alone feel the need to brutally attack and rape her? Rape is about humiliation and control ..very much the opposite of what they should have been feeling at that moment...freedom and relief of their oppressor. So I just don't understand why this happened then of all times...
                        To these people, or at least a part of them, the United States is/was the reason they lived under the dictator. In their minds, because we helped keep Mubarack in power for so long, we are a huge part of the problem.

                        It's horrible.
                        I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.
                        - Mahatma Gandhi



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                          I agree that to think horrid things about her attackers is unchristian like, but believe me, the Lord will NOT let their actions slide. I feel justification in being angry and disgusted with their behavior.
                          Search me, God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts.
                          See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                            Originally posted by the rookie View Post
                            Who knows what the response to this will be, so I'll say it carefully - Islam and the Koran (not speaking of Muslims - but of the ideology and the book) has no paradigm for the worth of a woman - i.e. what is reflected in Proverbs 31 or Ephesians 5. It is, from its roots, misogynistic. Thus the plight of women within radically Islamic contexts - they are either non-entities or objects of personal gratification in paradise. From its founder, Mohammed, on down, Islam is a radically anti-woman ideology.
                            Agreed. I don't understand how any women can willingly convert to it. It boggles my mind. I also don't understand why they were screaming "Jew! Jew!" during the attack either. I guess that's because I can't grasp a mindset that is so warped by evil. That would be a good thing.

                            Unfortunately, women being non-entities or objects of personal gratification isn't limited to radical Islam. It's pretty pervasive right here when you consider that statistics say 25% of all women in the U.S. will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime. That's pretty staggering on how a lot of men view/relate to women.

                            As for what happened to her making us angry... YES. And it makes God angry, too. They won't get away with it. One way or another.

                            Psalm 10
                            A Song of Confidence in God’s Triumph over Evil
                            1 Why do You stand afar off, O LORD?
                            Why do You hide in times of trouble?
                            2 The wicked in his pride persecutes the poor;
                            Let them be caught in the plots which they have devised.

                            3 For the wicked boasts of his heart’s desire;
                            He blesses the greedy and renounces the LORD.
                            4 The wicked in his proud countenance does not seek God;
                            God is in none of his thoughts.

                            5 His ways are always prospering;
                            Your judgments are far above, out of his sight;
                            As for all his enemies, he sneers at them.
                            6 He has said in his heart, “I shall not be moved;
                            I shall never be in adversity.”
                            7 His mouth is full of cursing and deceit and oppression;
                            Under his tongue is trouble and iniquity.

                            8 He sits in the lurking places of the villages;
                            In the secret places he murders the innocent;
                            His eyes are secretly fixed on the helpless.
                            9 He lies in wait secretly, as a lion in his den;
                            He lies in wait to catch the poor;
                            He catches the poor when he draws him into his net.
                            10 So he crouches, he lies low,
                            That the helpless may fall by his strength.
                            11 He has said in his heart,
                            “God has forgotten;
                            He hides His face;
                            He will never see.”

                            12 Arise, O LORD!
                            O God, lift up Your hand!
                            Do not forget the humble.
                            13 Why do the wicked renounce God?
                            He has said in his heart,
                            “You will not require an account.”

                            14 But You have seen, for You observe trouble and grief,
                            To repay it by Your hand.
                            The helpless commits himself to You;
                            You are the helper of the fatherless.
                            15 Break the arm of the wicked and the evil man;
                            Seek out his wickedness until You find none.

                            16 The LORD is King forever and ever;
                            The nations have perished out of His land.
                            17 LORD, You have heard the desire of the humble;
                            You will prepare their heart;
                            You will cause Your ear to hear,
                            18 To do justice to the fatherless and the oppressed,
                            That the man of the earth may oppress no more
                            I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrus...

                            All children left unattended will be given an espresso and a free puppy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The ugly underside of the Egypt protests

                              Oh, God help her. It's almost impossible to imagine how terrified she must have been. And it looks like the man on the left is threatening her, her whole body language is tense and fearful. God help her.
                              Please could everyone pray for Mieke and Charles.

                              My testimony http://bibleforums.org/forum/showthr...ight=testimony

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